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Luis Jimenez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The art of Luis Jimenez Jr. possesses a presence. Displayed in parks, museums and other public spaces around the nation, his massive fiberglass sculptures add beauty, provoke discussion and sometimes spark controversy. His art has been described as dominant, raw and passionate. Such work -- and the emotion he poured into it -- earned Jimenez international recognition, including exhibitions at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
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SPORTS
September 8, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Manager Mike Scioscia loves the youthful exuberance that players such as third baseman Luis Jimenez and outfielder Collin Cowgill have brought to the injury-battered Angels, who have won 12 of 15 games entering Sunday's series finale against the Texas Rangers in Anaheim. But both players probably went a little overboard in their attempts to score while Texas catcher A.J. Pierzynski was blocking the plate in Saturday night's 8-3 win over the Rangers. Cowgill, waved around third on Jimenez's second-inning double to left field, was tagged out after he slid past home and tried to reach back and touch the plate with his left hand.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I hope that I'm not just producing propaganda," says Texas-born Chicano artist Luis Jimenez, who depicts working-class Mexican and Chicano folk and seeks to bring a human dimension to stereotypes such as undocumented workers and lowriders.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Luis Jimenez began the season in the minor leagues, and two days ago J.B. Shuck was headed there. Andrew Romine, meanwhile, started the season on the Angels' bench, while Garrett Richards had one of the last seats in their bullpen. So when all four found themselves in the Angels' starting lineup Saturday against the Houston Astros, it appeared to be more of a statement about how far the team had fallen than about how fast those players' stock has risen. Yet that theory may have to be revised after Jimenez and Richards helped the Angels to a dramatic 5-4 win over the Astros that was decided on Albert Pujols' two-run, two-out double in the ninth inning.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Luis Jimenez installed his latest fiberglass sculpture, "Fiesta-Jarabe," at the Otay Mesa Border Station just southwest of San Diego Friday morning, he tread deftly on more than one borderline--literally and metaphorically. The eight-foot-tall sculpture depicts a Mexican couple dancing a traditional hat dance, and it stands just 10 feet north of the border between Mexico and the United States in a plaza that is actually just a few feet south--and outside of--the official border crossing.
SPORTS
September 8, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Manager Mike Scioscia loves the youthful exuberance that players such as third baseman Luis Jimenez and outfielder Collin Cowgill have brought to the injury-battered Angels, who have won 12 of 15 games entering Sunday's series finale against the Texas Rangers in Anaheim. But both players probably went a little overboard in their attempts to score while Texas catcher A.J. Pierzynski was blocking the plate in Saturday night's 8-3 win over the Rangers. Cowgill, waved around third on Jimenez's second-inning double to left field, was tagged out after he slid past home and tried to reach back and touch the plate with his left hand.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
PHOENIX -- Luis Jimenez sat before his corner locker in the Angels' clubhouse Saturday morning, pounding a wooden mallet into the pocket of a new first baseman's glove to soften the stiff leather. The mitt was a gift from fellow Dominican Albert Pujols. And if Jimenez learns to use it quickly enough it could earn him an invitation to the big leagues sometime this season. “We want to see his versatility,” Angel Manager Mike Scioscia said. “This guy has looked really good at third base.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
- Luis Jimenez sat in front of his corner locker in the Angels' clubhouse Saturday morning, pounding a wooden mallet into the pocket of a new first baseman's glove to soften the stiff leather. The mitt was a gift from fellow Dominican Albert Pujols . And if Jimenez learns to use it quickly enough it could earn him an invitation to the big leagues sometime this season. "We want to see his versatility," Angels Manager Mike Scioscia said. "This guy has looked really good at third base.
SPORTS
April 12, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
After losing two infielders to injury in the span of three days, the Angels called up Luis Jimenez from triple-A Salt Lake on Friday and immediately inserted him into the lineup. "I didn't expect that right away. But I came prepared," said Jimenez, who raced to his locker to text his aunt after learning he would be starting at third base. "I'm in the lineup. Put the game on," Jimenez, who was making his big-league debut, told his aunt. And provided she made it to the TV in time, she saw her nephew ground sharply to third in his first big-league at-bat in the third inning.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
While installing the 8-foot-high fiber glass sculpture "Fiesta--Jarabe" outside the Otay Mesa border station on Friday morning, Luis A. Jimenez Jr. stopped for a moment to go inside the government facility that serves as the official entry from Mexico into the United States. The New Mexico-based artist, who has just completed the $57,000 commission awarded in 1986 from the U.S. General Services Administration, said he found himself in a familiar--but deeply disturbing--situation. "Citizenship?
SPORTS
April 12, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
After losing two infielders to injury in the span of three days, the Angels called up Luis Jimenez from triple-A Salt Lake on Friday and immediately inserted him into the lineup. "I didn't expect that right away. But I came prepared," said Jimenez, who raced to his locker to text his aunt after learning he would be starting at third base. "I'm in the lineup. Put the game on," Jimenez, who was making his big-league debut, told his aunt. And provided she made it to the TV in time, she saw her nephew ground sharply to third in his first big-league at-bat in the third inning.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
- Luis Jimenez sat in front of his corner locker in the Angels' clubhouse Saturday morning, pounding a wooden mallet into the pocket of a new first baseman's glove to soften the stiff leather. The mitt was a gift from fellow Dominican Albert Pujols . And if Jimenez learns to use it quickly enough it could earn him an invitation to the big leagues sometime this season. "We want to see his versatility," Angels Manager Mike Scioscia said. "This guy has looked really good at third base.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
PHOENIX -- Luis Jimenez sat before his corner locker in the Angels' clubhouse Saturday morning, pounding a wooden mallet into the pocket of a new first baseman's glove to soften the stiff leather. The mitt was a gift from fellow Dominican Albert Pujols. And if Jimenez learns to use it quickly enough it could earn him an invitation to the big leagues sometime this season. “We want to see his versatility,” Angel Manager Mike Scioscia said. “This guy has looked really good at third base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The art of Luis Jimenez Jr. possesses a presence. Displayed in parks, museums and other public spaces around the nation, his massive fiberglass sculptures add beauty, provoke discussion and sometimes spark controversy. His art has been described as dominant, raw and passionate. Such work -- and the emotion he poured into it -- earned Jimenez international recognition, including exhibitions at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I hope that I'm not just producing propaganda," says Texas-born Chicano artist Luis Jimenez, who depicts working-class Mexican and Chicano folk and seeks to bring a human dimension to stereotypes such as undocumented workers and lowriders.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Luis Jimenez installed his latest fiberglass sculpture, "Fiesta-Jarabe," at the Otay Mesa Border Station just southwest of San Diego Friday morning, he tread deftly on more than one borderline--literally and metaphorically. The eight-foot-tall sculpture depicts a Mexican couple dancing a traditional hat dance, and it stands just 10 feet north of the border between Mexico and the United States in a plaza that is actually just a few feet south--and outside of--the official border crossing.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Luis Jimenez began the season in the minor leagues, and two days ago J.B. Shuck was headed there. Andrew Romine, meanwhile, started the season on the Angels' bench, while Garrett Richards had one of the last seats in their bullpen. So when all four found themselves in the Angels' starting lineup Saturday against the Houston Astros, it appeared to be more of a statement about how far the team had fallen than about how fast those players' stock has risen. Yet that theory may have to be revised after Jimenez and Richards helped the Angels to a dramatic 5-4 win over the Astros that was decided on Albert Pujols' two-run, two-out double in the ninth inning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | STEPHANIE BROMMER
Betty Jimenez of Oxnard, who has volunteered with the Ventura County chapter of the American Red Cross for 15 years, has been named a family services coordinator with reflief efforts under way for victims of Hurricane Luis. Jimenez, who is scheduled to leave today, is expected to be sent to Puerto Rico, Antigua or the U.S. Virgin Islands.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
While installing the 8-foot-high fiber glass sculpture "Fiesta--Jarabe" outside the Otay Mesa border station on Friday morning, Luis A. Jimenez Jr. stopped for a moment to go inside the government facility that serves as the official entry from Mexico into the United States. The New Mexico-based artist, who has just completed the $57,000 commission awarded in 1986 from the U.S. General Services Administration, said he found himself in a familiar--but deeply disturbing--situation. "Citizenship?
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