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Luis Monreal

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
When Luis Monreal leaves the Getty Conservation Institute on Tuesday, he will walk away from an efficient, highly regarded organization that he has built in five years flat. Acting as a catalytic force for international art conservation, GCI spearheads field projects around the world, offers expertise, runs training programs and conducts scientific research.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
When Luis Monreal leaves the Getty Conservation Institute on Tuesday, he will walk away from an efficient, highly regarded organization that he has built in five years flat. Acting as a catalytic force for international art conservation, GCI spearheads field projects around the world, offers expertise, runs training programs and conducts scientific research.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1986
Luis Monreal, director of the Getty Conservation Institute, paints an absurd and insulting caricature of modern archeology ("The Getty Conservators Dig In," by Suzanne Muchnic, April 5). The only archeologist "digging for buried treasure" these days is Indiana Jones. Archeologists are skilled, careful scientists trying to reconstruct the past from quantities of broken and nondescript pottery, stone, and bone, not callous grave-robbers with a "tradition of destruction." It is ridiculous to "assume" that Greek marble statues would still have their polychrome paint if only they were "properly excavated."
OPINION
June 25, 1989
Luis Monreal was packing for Bolivia when we caught him at the Getty Conservation Institute, where he presides over a quiet campaign intended to change the way the world looks after its cultural heritage. He was going to check a major archeological site. "Since the Renaissance, people have only been interested in restoring rather than preserving works of art," he told us. "We must do more preventive work. It is more effective and it is cheaper. As in medicine." So it is that a substantial commitment has been made by the J. Paul Getty Trust to create the Conservation Institute, under the direction of Monreal, and to undertake, for the first time on such a scale, a systematic research and development program dedicated exclusively to art conservation.
OPINION
June 25, 1989
Luis Monreal was packing for Bolivia when we caught him at the Getty Conservation Institute, where he presides over a quiet campaign intended to change the way the world looks after its cultural heritage. He was going to check a major archeological site. "Since the Renaissance, people have only been interested in restoring rather than preserving works of art," he told us. "We must do more preventive work. It is more effective and it is cheaper. As in medicine." So it is that a substantial commitment has been made by the J. Paul Getty Trust to create the Conservation Institute, under the direction of Monreal, and to undertake, for the first time on such a scale, a systematic research and development program dedicated exclusively to art conservation.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | MIMI MANN, Associated Press
Far fewer generations will see the world's ancient monuments than have seen them already. Fewer still will see them if nations don't soon decide which to save and which to let die. Changing temperatures and humidities, indoor and outdoor air pollution, artificial light, traffic, bacteria and other ills are causing monuments and antiquities everywhere to fall apart. "The decisions are going to be difficult, but if governments and officials don't act, there'll be very little left," said Luis Monreal, an international conservation specialist.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Monreal Moves to UNESCO: Luis Monreal has resigned as director of the Getty Conservation Institute to become coordinator of Cultural Heritage Programs for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Monreal, 47, who turned the Getty into a major force in worldwide conservation during his five-year tenure, will be in charge of programs related to archeological sites, monuments and museum collections, effective May 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1986 | DAVID CROOK
The J. Paul Getty Trust announced plans Monday for a massive yearlong study and restoration of a 3,200-year-old Egyptian tomb. The project, a joint operation of the Egyptian Antiquities Organization and the Getty Conservation Institute, will include a joint scientific study and conservation treatment of the badly deteriorated wall paintings in the tomb of Nefertari, a queen of Ramses II, in upper Egypt. The tomb is in the Valley of the Queens in West Thebes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
The J. Paul Getty Trust has named Luis Monreal director of the new Getty Conservation Institute, The Times has learned. Harold Williams, president of the trust, confirmed the news late Friday, after unofficial reports of Monreal's appointment. Monreal, currently secretary general of the International Council of Museums in Paris, will head an institute that is expected to become the world's leading center in the scientific preservation and restoration of artworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Miguel Angel Corzo, president of the Friends of the Arts of Mexico Foundation and organizer of a current landmark exhibition of Mexican art, has been appointed director of the Getty Conservation Institute. Beginning in January, he will lead an 8-year-old organization that promotes art conservation worldwide through scientific research, training, documentation and field projects.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | MIMI MANN, Associated Press
Far fewer generations will see the world's ancient monuments than have seen them already. Fewer still will see them if nations don't soon decide which to save and which to let die. Changing temperatures and humidities, indoor and outdoor air pollution, artificial light, traffic, bacteria and other ills are causing monuments and antiquities everywhere to fall apart. "The decisions are going to be difficult, but if governments and officials don't act, there'll be very little left," said Luis Monreal, an international conservation specialist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1986
Luis Monreal, director of the Getty Conservation Institute, paints an absurd and insulting caricature of modern archeology ("The Getty Conservators Dig In," by Suzanne Muchnic, April 5). The only archeologist "digging for buried treasure" these days is Indiana Jones. Archeologists are skilled, careful scientists trying to reconstruct the past from quantities of broken and nondescript pottery, stone, and bone, not callous grave-robbers with a "tradition of destruction." It is ridiculous to "assume" that Greek marble statues would still have their polychrome paint if only they were "properly excavated."
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
In key. On note. Gordon P. Getty (synonymous with millions) will speak at the spring luncheon meeting of the Hollywood Bowl Patroness Committee on May 7 at the home of Mrs. Clifford W. Lord in Beverly Hills. But not about money. About music. The classical American composer's most prominent work, the complete opera "Plump Jack," will be premiered by the BBC in July at London's Royal Festival Hall. Getty happens to be a friend of Mrs. Stanley R.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
If you want to irritate Sayed Tawfik, the new chairman of the Egyptian Antiquities Organization, just put on a patronizing face and announce that you would like to help his country. He has little patience with disingenuous foreign archeologists who use his country to "help themselves become famous Egyptologists," he said the other day in an interview at the Getty Conservation Institute in Marina del Rey.
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