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Luis Rodriguez

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NEWS
March 31, 1993 | GREGG BARRIOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Luis Rodriguez walks up a short, steep hill on Geraghty Avenue in East Los Angeles, his 17-year-old son Ramiro a few steps behind. Rodriguez is spending the day revisiting the industrial areas around Vernon, South San Gabriel and East L.A., and the Mexican colonia in Watts, the neighborhoods where he grew up in the 1960s and which he describes in his recently published memoir, "Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A."
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SPORTS
March 30, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
After setting their opening-day roster Saturday, the Angels announced several personnel moves following their 2-1 exhibition win over the Dodgers at Angel Stadium. Infielders Efren Navarro and Luis Rodriguez, catcher Chris Snyder and left-hander Mitch Stetter were all reassigned and catcher John Hester, infielder Luis Jimenez, right-hander David Carpenter and outfielder Kole Calhoun were optioned to triple-A Salt Lake. Pitchers Ryan Madson and Andrew Taylor were placed on the disabled list.
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SPORTS
March 28, 2013
Angels 6, Texas 3 AT THE PLATE: Luis Rodriguez hit a run-scoring double in the third inning, and Kaleb Cowart hit a two-run triple in the sixth. The Angels, who finished Cactus League play with a 9-18-4 record, lead the major leagues with 20 triples this spring, and they rank second in scoring with 201 runs. ON THE MOUND: A brutal spring for the bullpen ended on a high note when closer Ernesto Frieri retired the side in order in the ninth. Kevin Jepsen escaped a bases-loaded, one-out jam in the seventh, and Sean Burnett gave up a run and three hits in the eighth.
SPORTS
March 28, 2013
Angels 6, Texas 3 AT THE PLATE: Luis Rodriguez hit a run-scoring double in the third inning, and Kaleb Cowart hit a two-run triple in the sixth. The Angels, who finished Cactus League play with a 9-18-4 record, lead the major leagues with 20 triples this spring, and they rank second in scoring with 201 runs. ON THE MOUND: A brutal spring for the bullpen ended on a high note when closer Ernesto Frieri retired the side in order in the ninth. Kevin Jepsen escaped a bases-loaded, one-out jam in the seventh, and Sean Burnett gave up a run and three hits in the eighth.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Luis J. Rodriguez, finally, has stopped running. His fast-paced criminal life long over and his demons now at rest, Rodriguez's world is converging here in the northeast San Fernando Valley, where he and his wife have bought their first home and are now hoping to stir young, neglected minds and awaken future artists. Eight years after his award-winning memoir, "Always Running," hit a national nerve with its raw and honest depictions of L.A.
BOOKS
March 7, 1993 | Floyd Salas, Salas is the author of "Tattoo the Wicked Cross" (1967), a novel about a boy in a reform school, and "Buffalo Nickel" (1992), a memoir about a young boy's coming of age under the influence of two older brothers, one an intellectual prodigy and the other a drug addict and convict.
"Always Running" is a pilgrim's progress, a classic tale of the new immigrant in the land of the melting pot. It's the story of how Luis Rodriguez, as a Mexican-American boy, journeyed from poverty in a family that had emigrated to a land where his father couldn't earn a decent living; through hard child labor, gangs and drugs; to, finally, educational enlightenment through high school and community projects.
SPORTS
July 10, 1996 | Associated Press
Luis Rodriguez, a slick Cuban welterweight who fought a memorable four-bout series with Emile Griffith in the 1960s, has died at 59. Rodriguez, who won 107 of 120 fights with 49 knockouts, died Monday at a Miami Beach hospital. He had undergone kidney dialysis for the past two years. "He belonged with the great ones," Angelo Dundee, who trained Rodriguez, said.
BOOKS
March 28, 1993
Being a stranger in a new land, albeit a country that one or one's parents have chosen, is not always easy. Luis Rodriguez, in his reviews of "Growing Up Latino" and "Drink Cultura" (Feb. 28), recounts the embarrassment felt by a Mexican immigrant child when she made God what sounded like a "string bean" and not a "supreme being." He then proceeds to posit a bleak world for Latinos in the United States. As a personal aside, when I was a child I was called a "dirty Mexican" in the confessional by an Irish-American priest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994
I was outraged to read another article about the United States' social injustice, "Los Angeles' Gang Culture Arrives in El Salvador, Courtesy of the INS" (by Luis Rodriguez, Opinion, May 8). I am a citizen of El Salvador who came to this country in 1972 at the age of 8 with my mother and a younger brother. We grew up in a single-parent household in the Pico-Union district of Los Angeles. Despite having to hold down two jobs, my mother was able to raise two children who went on to graduate from college and obtain responsible positions in the community.
MAGAZINE
May 5, 2002 | ABEL SALAS
Homeboy and word-slinger Luis J. Rodriguez has never been busier. The poet, memoirist and educator is promoting a new short story collection, "The Republic of East L.A." (HarperCollins). We shadowed the soft-spoken, tattooed, East L.A.-bred author during a few days that included interviews, readings, a stop at Tia Chucha's, the cafe, bookshop and art gallery he co-founded in Sylmar, and a dash home to the San Fernando Valley for an after-school pickup.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Luis J. Rodríguez has been called "a superhero in Chicano literature" for his steady output of poems, fiction and above all for "Always Running," his classic 1993 memoir about jettisoning his former life as an East L.A. gangbanger. The Dalai Lama once praised him as an "unsung hero of compassion. " His old friend John Densmore, drummer for the Doors, describes him as a curandero, the term for a traditional Mexican healer who ministers to his community's wounds. But over lunch recently in a northeast San Fernando Valley strip mall, Rodríguez offered a far more mixed self-appraisal.
BOOKS
April 24, 2005 | Jimmy Santiago Baca, Jimmy Santiago Baca is the author of numerous books, including "The Importance of a Piece of Paper," "Winter Poems Along the Rio Grande" and "Immigrants in Our Own Land."
"Music of the Mill," a steelworker/immigrant story by Luis J. Rodriguez, the acclaimed author of "Always Running," "The Republic of East L.A." and "Hearts and Hands," is divided into three parts expressed through three generations of the Salcido family -- the father, Procopio, his son Johnny and finally, granddaughter Azucena. I'm going to love this story, I thought.
BOOKS
May 5, 2002 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
The very first story in "The Republic of East L.A.," a collection of short fiction by Luis J. Rodriguez, opens with the arresting image of a limousine parked at a curb in Boyle Heights, one of the byways of the barrio that Rodriguez calls "East Los." The limo, a universal symbol of wealth and privilege, is seemingly out of place in a neighborhood that shelters the poor and powerless.
MAGAZINE
May 5, 2002 | ABEL SALAS
Homeboy and word-slinger Luis J. Rodriguez has never been busier. The poet, memoirist and educator is promoting a new short story collection, "The Republic of East L.A." (HarperCollins). We shadowed the soft-spoken, tattooed, East L.A.-bred author during a few days that included interviews, readings, a stop at Tia Chucha's, the cafe, bookshop and art gallery he co-founded in Sylmar, and a dash home to the San Fernando Valley for an after-school pickup.
BOOKS
December 23, 2001 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
"Lost causes," affirms Luis J. Rodriguez in "Hearts and Hands," "are the only ones worth fighting for." The cause that Rodriguez finds so compelling begins with what he calls "a cultural malaise of isolation and meaninglessness." The real victims of that malaise, he insists, are the young people of America. And their anomie is expressed in acts of seemingly senseless violence, not only in the barrio and urban areas but in the suburbs of Littleton, Colo., and Santee, Calif., too.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Luis J. Rodriguez, finally, has stopped running. His fast-paced criminal life long over and his demons now at rest, Rodriguez's world is converging here in the northeast San Fernando Valley, where he and his wife have bought their first home and are now hoping to stir young, neglected minds and awaken future artists. Eight years after his award-winning memoir, "Always Running," hit a national nerve with its raw and honest depictions of L.A.
SPORTS
March 30, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
After setting their opening-day roster Saturday, the Angels announced several personnel moves following their 2-1 exhibition win over the Dodgers at Angel Stadium. Infielders Efren Navarro and Luis Rodriguez, catcher Chris Snyder and left-hander Mitch Stetter were all reassigned and catcher John Hester, infielder Luis Jimenez, right-hander David Carpenter and outfielder Kole Calhoun were optioned to triple-A Salt Lake. Pitchers Ryan Madson and Andrew Taylor were placed on the disabled list.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Luis J. Rodríguez has been called "a superhero in Chicano literature" for his steady output of poems, fiction and above all for "Always Running," his classic 1993 memoir about jettisoning his former life as an East L.A. gangbanger. The Dalai Lama once praised him as an "unsung hero of compassion. " His old friend John Densmore, drummer for the Doors, describes him as a curandero, the term for a traditional Mexican healer who ministers to his community's wounds. But over lunch recently in a northeast San Fernando Valley strip mall, Rodríguez offered a far more mixed self-appraisal.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | MARK CROMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three years ago Luis Rodriguez was slouched against a pole inside an Austrian bar. The celebrated author of "Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A." was touring Europe to promote his poetry and, like so many other American writers before him, he embraced the continent's bars with a vengeance. As he knocked back round after round, Rodriguez felt right at home. Though in a foreign land, the bar provided familiar territory. He remembers making it to his 25th beer that night.
SPORTS
July 10, 1996 | Associated Press
Luis Rodriguez, a slick Cuban welterweight who fought a memorable four-bout series with Emile Griffith in the 1960s, has died at 59. Rodriguez, who won 107 of 120 fights with 49 knockouts, died Monday at a Miami Beach hospital. He had undergone kidney dialysis for the past two years. "He belonged with the great ones," Angelo Dundee, who trained Rodriguez, said.
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