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Luis Rubio

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NEWS
June 7, 1998 | From Reuters
A Mexican journalist's speech in front of the president has blown the lid off one of the country's biggest open secrets: that much of the press corps takes bribes from the government for rosy news coverage. The revelation has emboldened a few Mexican journalists to talk about how government officials dole out to certain reporters envelopes of cash, all-expense-paid vacations or nights of drinking and visits to prostitutes, according to journalists who declined to be identified.
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NEWS
June 7, 1998 | From Reuters
A Mexican journalist's speech in front of the president has blown the lid off one of the country's biggest open secrets: that much of the press corps takes bribes from the government for rosy news coverage. The revelation has emboldened a few Mexican journalists to talk about how government officials dole out to certain reporters envelopes of cash, all-expense-paid vacations or nights of drinking and visits to prostitutes, according to journalists who declined to be identified.
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SCIENCE
June 4, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 13-month-old girl known as Peru's "Little Mermaid" was alert and healthy Friday two days after her fused legs were surgically separated. Milagros Cerron was born with a rare defect called mermaid syndrome, or sirenomelia. Before the four-hour operation, Milagros' legs moved separately but were trapped in a sack of tissue and fat down to her heels. "She is in very good spirits and she's strong," said Dr. Luis Rubio, who led the surgical team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997
The two Feb. 23 Opinion articles, by Luis Rubio ("Is Mexico Becoming a Colombia?") and by Michael A. Males ("Teenage Heroin Use? Real Drug Crisis Is Those Over 30"), are very informative. They bring up the statistics bearing on drug use and show that in spite of all the money spent on arresting dealers and on interdiction (in the billions of dollars) drugs are still available to those who want them. We can blame Colombia, Peru, Bolivia and Mexico, but the fact is that as long as there is a market for drugs and the profits are high, somebody will supply users.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2005 | From Reuters
Doctors have successfully taken the first step toward separating the fused legs of Milagros Cerron, a 9-month-old Peruvian child dubbed the "Little Mermaid" because of her rare birth defect. "Everything went well, but it's a tough time. Her mother is crying, we're crying," her father, Ricardo Cerron, 24, told Reuters after the operation Tuesday.
WORLD
June 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
Surgeons began a delicate operation late Tuesday on Peru's "little mermaid," a baby born with her legs fused from her thighs to her ankles. The surgery was the first of three planned to repair the rare birth defect. Thirteen-month-old Milagros Cerron giggled and played on her hospital bed ahead of the surgery. She is about the size and weight of a normal 6-month-old. The operation was to last four to six hours, said Dr. Luis Rubio, leader of a team of 11 surgeons.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The government has arrested four prominent stockbrokers and is investigating 148 others on charges of illegal trading stemming from the historic crash of the Mexican stock market in October, 1987, a spokesman for the attorney general confirmed Tuesday. The spokesman said federal police detained Eduardo Legorreta, head of Operadora de Bolsa, the country's second-largest brokerage firm, on Monday night.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's currency and stock markets--battered by high interest rates and national uncertainty--were sucked Monday into the vacuum left by the government's failure to announce a new economic program in response to the country's deepening crisis. The Bolsa index fell 4.77% to 1,447.52, its lowest level in more than two years, while the peso weakened from 5.95 to as many as 6.08 to the dollar, before closing at 5.97.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the kind of smile-a-thon Cuauhtemoc Cardenas must have expected after he overwhelmingly won election last year, catapulting from opposition hero to first elected mayor of Mexico's capital. Dedicating a building in the capital's tony Polanco neighborhood this week, Cardenas was applauded by scores of hard-hatted construction workers, toasted with champagne by business executives, mobbed by photographers.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was one of the nation's toughest governors, a veteran of top military and drug-fighting jobs. But Morelos state Gov. Jorge Carrillo Olea was defeated this week by an unexpected enemy: opposition parties and an angry public. Carrillo Olea, a prominent figure in the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, resigned Friday after an unheard-of impeachment procedure got underway against him in his state's Congress.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico put a cap on soaring interest rates Wednesday as part of an attempt to defuse its mounting debt crisis. Interest rates on existing business loans will be limited to 25%, and to 38.5% on credit card loans, under an agreement negotiated between the Finance Ministry and the Mexican Bankers Assn. The cap affects only outstanding debt, not new loans.
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