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Luise Rainer

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April 28, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Hollywood career of Luise Rainer is sometimes cited to prove that Oscar can be a jinx, as if that famous gold statuette can fetch calamity as well as prosperity. It is true that Rainer received unprecedented back-to-back Academy Awards as best actress, for "The Great Ziegfeld" in 1936 and "The Good Earth" in 1937. It is also true that within half a dozen years she had fled Hollywood for the sanctuary of the New York stage and then for England and her native Europe and a new life.
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February 24, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
The Academy Awards are the biggest fashion runway on the planet. When Jennifer Lawrence, Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried and other stars step out onto the red carpet Sunday, they will be primed to talk as much about what and who they are wearing as about the films that got them there. But it wasn't always this way. The first Academy Awards, held in 1929 at the Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood, was a low-key affair - a small dinner and 15-minute ceremony. There was no red carpet, and no one's dresses were on display since the event was not televised.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When she was in Los Angeles on a visit in 1987, Luise Rainer mused about a career that, more than most, could be described as meteoric, in both directions. She had been discovered in Vienna in 1935 by an MGM scout who saw her on stage in "An American Tragedy." Her first Hollywood film, "Escapade," in 1936 (written by Herman Mankiewicz, directed by Robert Z. Leonard, co-starring William Powell), made her a star. She made eight films in three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Once a screen legend, always a screen legend. Luise Rainer, who turned 100 in January, is not only the oldest living performer to win an Academy Award, she was the first to win back-to-back Oscars for best actress for 1936's "The Great Ziegfeld" and a year later for "The Good Earth." The German-born actress' stint in Hollywood, though, was short-lived. She chafed under the strict contract system at MGM and was at loggerheads with famed studio boss Louis B. Mayer. Her subsequent handful of films for MGM after her second Oscar didn't impress critics or audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1997 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Hollywood?" Luise Rainer ponders, stretching the word's three syllables to an almost comic length. "I felt very alone in Hollywood. I couldn't wait to get out. I hated the films they asked me to make. They put me on a pedestal in Hollywood--and I didn't like being put on a pedestal." And so she quit, at the very height of her fame.
IMAGE
February 24, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
The Academy Awards are the biggest fashion runway on the planet. When Jennifer Lawrence, Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried and other stars step out onto the red carpet Sunday, they will be primed to talk as much about what and who they are wearing as about the films that got them there. But it wasn't always this way. The first Academy Awards, held in 1929 at the Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood, was a low-key affair - a small dinner and 15-minute ceremony. There was no red carpet, and no one's dresses were on display since the event was not televised.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Once a screen legend, always a screen legend. Luise Rainer, who turned 100 in January, is not only the oldest living performer to win an Academy Award, she was the first to win back-to-back Oscars for best actress for 1936's "The Great Ziegfeld" and a year later for "The Good Earth." The German-born actress' stint in Hollywood, though, was short-lived. She chafed under the strict contract system at MGM and was at loggerheads with famed studio boss Louis B. Mayer. Her subsequent handful of films for MGM after her second Oscar didn't impress critics or audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actor Danny Huston recalls the first time he saw "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre." "I remember projecting it literally on a wall in Ireland as I was growing up. It was how I said hello to my grandfather," he says. That grandfather was the great character actor Walter Huston, who died before his grandson was born, and the film was directed by his legendary father, John Huston. The 1948 morality tale about a trio of greedy gold prospectors, which also starred Humphrey Bogart, is one of the films that Huston and his sister, actress Anjelica Huston, will be presenting at the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival, kicking off Thursday in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1999 | Jin Whang, (714) 966-7440
The Cypress Senior Center will screen classic movies for free Wednesdays and Fridays next month. The movies include "Royal Wedding" and "Care Free," which stars Fred Astaire, and "The Great Waltz," starring Luise Rainer. The videos start at 12:45 p.m., and free popcorn will be served. The center is at 5700 Orange Ave. For movie listings, screening schedule and information, call (714) 229-2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actor Danny Huston recalls the first time he saw "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre." "I remember projecting it literally on a wall in Ireland as I was growing up. It was how I said hello to my grandfather," he says. That grandfather was the great character actor Walter Huston, who died before his grandson was born, and the film was directed by his legendary father, John Huston. The 1948 morality tale about a trio of greedy gold prospectors, which also starred Humphrey Bogart, is one of the films that Huston and his sister, actress Anjelica Huston, will be presenting at the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival, kicking off Thursday in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1997 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Hollywood?" Luise Rainer ponders, stretching the word's three syllables to an almost comic length. "I felt very alone in Hollywood. I couldn't wait to get out. I hated the films they asked me to make. They put me on a pedestal in Hollywood--and I didn't like being put on a pedestal." And so she quit, at the very height of her fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When she was in Los Angeles on a visit in 1987, Luise Rainer mused about a career that, more than most, could be described as meteoric, in both directions. She had been discovered in Vienna in 1935 by an MGM scout who saw her on stage in "An American Tragedy." Her first Hollywood film, "Escapade," in 1936 (written by Herman Mankiewicz, directed by Robert Z. Leonard, co-starring William Powell), made her a star. She made eight films in three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Hollywood career of Luise Rainer is sometimes cited to prove that Oscar can be a jinx, as if that famous gold statuette can fetch calamity as well as prosperity. It is true that Rainer received unprecedented back-to-back Academy Awards as best actress, for "The Great Ziegfeld" in 1936 and "The Good Earth" in 1937. It is also true that within half a dozen years she had fled Hollywood for the sanctuary of the New York stage and then for England and her native Europe and a new life.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1997
I can't look at the photo of German actress Luise Rainer accepting her Oscar for the role of O-Lan, the long-suffering Chinese wife in 1937's "The Good Earth," without recalling a story behind the scenes ("Thirties Something," by David Gritten, Oct. 26). One performer who desperately wanted to play O-Lan was Chinese American actress Anna May Wong, who had already made a name for herself at Paramount. Knowing she would never be considered for any lead white roles, Wong lobbied MGM to play one of Hollywood's few positive Asian lead female characters.
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