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Luiseno Mission Indians

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NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tribal officials on the Pechanga Indian Reservation near Temecula have filed a lawsuit to block a water district's plan to pump treated sewage into the area's underground aquifer. The suit, filed by the Temecula Band of Luiseno Mission Indians in Riverside County Superior Court, charges that the Rancho California Water District violated state environmental laws by approving the sewage project without adequately assessing its impact.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"The Southwest Museum has a world-class collection, but it does not have a world-class museum," says Duane King, director of the 94-year-old institution in Mount Washington.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1998
In spite of being inundated with pro and con ads about Prop. 5, I still have questions. The proponents claim support of 85 tribes. How many total tribes are there in California? What are their populations? What are the qualifications for membership (what fraction of Indian blood)? What percentages of the tribes' members live on the reservations? The proponents promise to contribute to other tribes that do not have casinos. What percentage of their income will be so shared? Indians were granted citizenship about 75 years ago, while the tribes were and are still treated as separate, sovereign states.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The Southwest Museum, which is considering joining forces with the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, may have found a second suitor. The Pechanga band of Luiseno Indians, which operates a lucrative casino near Temecula, has submitted a formal letter of inquiry to the museum about exploring a possible alliance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The Southwest Museum, which is considering joining forces with the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, may have found a second suitor. The Pechanga band of Luiseno Indians, which operates a lucrative casino near Temecula, has submitted a formal letter of inquiry to the museum about exploring a possible alliance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"The Southwest Museum has a world-class collection, but it does not have a world-class museum," says Duane King, director of the 94-year-old institution in Mount Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Riverside County judge refused Friday to dismiss a suit by about 130 members of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians seeking to remain in the tribe and share $10.5 million in annual revenue from the tribe's casino, their attorney, Jon Velie, said. The plaintiffs, who comprise about 10% of the Temecula band, say individuals on the tribe's enrollment committee are trying to illegally increase their wealth by reducing the number of tribal members eligible for shares in the casino profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Shelby Grad
Indian casinos in California will be allowed to add more than 3,000 new slot machines, a state commission has decided. The state's gaming commission agreed to the new slot machines after a federal court ruled that some Indian casinos were due them under contracts signed with the state. Most of the new slots will go to Northern California tribes, but some new machines will go to casinos in northern San Diego County and the Inland Empire. According to the California Gambling Control Commission, the machines are going to: Big Sandy Band Rancheria of Mono Indians, 1,650; Blue Lake Rancheria, 40; Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, 44; Cachil Dehe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community, 427; Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians, 100; Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians, 45; Paskenta Band of Nomalki Indians, 27; Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians, 200; Rincon Band of San Luiseno Mission Indians, 400; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians, 428; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians, 187. Some officials hope the new slots will increase revenue to the cash-strapped state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2004 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
The Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians has formally ejected more than 100 people from the tribe, edging them out of their ancestral heritage and $10,000 a month in casino revenue payments. The disenfranchised tribal members figure in a long-simmering reservation dispute that culminated in a lawsuit brought by 11 of their number who had hoped to block their ouster from one of California's most successful tribal gambling enterprises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2003
Title: Unknown Producer: Unknown Script: Mark Macarro, above, tribal chairman of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians, which operates a large hotel-casino in Temecula, is seen speaking outdoors facing the camera as upbeat music plays in the background. "Southern California tribes have begun to take their legal place in a political process that we've been barred from for so long. During our long battle, some elected officials have listened to our plight and have helped us," Macarro says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1998
In spite of being inundated with pro and con ads about Prop. 5, I still have questions. The proponents claim support of 85 tribes. How many total tribes are there in California? What are their populations? What are the qualifications for membership (what fraction of Indian blood)? What percentages of the tribes' members live on the reservations? The proponents promise to contribute to other tribes that do not have casinos. What percentage of their income will be so shared? Indians were granted citizenship about 75 years ago, while the tribes were and are still treated as separate, sovereign states.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tribal officials on the Pechanga Indian Reservation near Temecula have filed a lawsuit to block a water district's plan to pump treated sewage into the area's underground aquifer. The suit, filed by the Temecula Band of Luiseno Mission Indians in Riverside County Superior Court, charges that the Rancho California Water District violated state environmental laws by approving the sewage project without adequately assessing its impact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2004 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. District Court judge in Riverside on Monday denied a request to prevent the ejection of 130 members of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians who stand to lose their tribal identity and $10,000 a month in stipends from the tribe's casino revenues. In a seven-page ruling, Judge Robert J. Timlin said the request for a temporary restraining order against the members of the Pechanga Band's enrollment committee was beyond federal court jurisdiction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2004 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
Before the Indian casino opened here, few people had any interest in joining the Chumash tribe. But now that each member collects close to $350,000 a year in gambling revenue, nearly everyone with a drop of Chumash blood wants in. "A lot of people found out they were Indian," joked George Armenta, chairman of the Chumash enrollment committee. Infighting over lineage is tearing apart many tribes with gambling operations.
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