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Luiz Fernando Da Costa

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NEWS
April 26, 2001 | Times Wire Services
Brazil's most powerful drug lord, Luiz Fernando da Costa, arrived here Wednesday, five days after he was captured in Colombia. Da Costa arrived in Brasilia aboard a Brazilian air force plane and was taken to police headquarters. Da Costa, with one arm in a sling tucked under a bulletproof vest, was briefly shown to reporters at the headquarters, his first public appearance in Brazil in five years.
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NEWS
April 26, 2001 | Times Wire Services
Brazil's most powerful drug lord, Luiz Fernando da Costa, arrived here Wednesday, five days after he was captured in Colombia. Da Costa arrived in Brasilia aboard a Brazilian air force plane and was taken to police headquarters. Da Costa, with one arm in a sling tucked under a bulletproof vest, was briefly shown to reporters at the headquarters, his first public appearance in Brazil in five years.
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NEWS
March 27, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weakened by bullet wounds, his empire crumbling, Luiz Fernando da Costa has spent weeks fleeing a military strike force in the jungles of eastern Colombia. But the Brazilian drug lord, nicknamed Fernandinho Beira Mar (Freddy Seashore) for the coastal slum near Rio where he was born, is still dangerous. During the years when he became a new breed of crime boss, forging an unprecedented alliance with Colombian guerrillas, the only weapon Da Costa needed was a telephone.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weakened by bullet wounds, his empire crumbling, Luiz Fernando da Costa has spent weeks fleeing a military strike force in the jungles of eastern Colombia. But the Brazilian drug lord, nicknamed Fernandinho Beira Mar (Freddy Seashore) for the coastal slum near Rio where he was born, is still dangerous. During the years when he became a new breed of crime boss, forging an unprecedented alliance with Colombian guerrillas, the only weapon Da Costa needed was a telephone.
WORLD
April 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Armed men firing from pickup trucks and flying in a helicopter attacked a maximum-security prison holding some of Brazil's highest-profile inmates but were repelled by guards, authorities said. No inmates escaped. The federal prison attacked late Sunday houses Colombian drug lord Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia and Brazilian gang leader Luiz Fernando da Costa -- and officials were investigating whether the gunmen were trying to free either of them. The helicopter never landed, according to a Justice Ministry spokesman who declined to give his name.
WORLD
October 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of businesses in crime-plagued Rio de Janeiro shut down after powerful drug lords reportedly ordered a lockdown. Police pleaded for storekeepers--including some in the city center and the posh South Zone, with its famous Copacabana and Ipanema beaches--not to cave in to the pressure. Gangs control hundreds of Rio's shantytowns and often order shops and schools to close when a prominent gang member is arrested or killed.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Brazil's best-known drug lord has proposed that fellow inmate Gloria Trevi, Mexico's fallen queen of pop, lighten up his time behind bars with a bit of "jailhouse rock," a Brazilian newspaper reported. Luiz Fernando da Costa, who is awaiting sentencing in the same Brasilia jail as Trevi, allegedly offered to pay the fallen singer $40,000 for an exclusive musical performance, the daily Extra reported.
WORLD
July 5, 2003 | From Reuters
Colombian prosecutors Friday charged top Marxist rebels with drug trafficking, a move that could make it easier to extradite them to the United States if they are caught but could also complicate any future peace talks. Prosecutors believe one of the main reasons for the recent spectacular growth of the 17,000-strong Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, has been income from the cocaine trade.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Reuters
Troops deep in the Colombian jungle have located and are closing in on Brazil's top drug lord, accused of selling arms to leftist rebels in exchange for cocaine, the army said Friday. Luiz Fernando da Costa, known by his Brazilian nickname Fernandinho Beira Mar, is believed to be on the run in a thick jungle region near Colombia's border with Venezuela and Brazil.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazil's biggest drug trafficker was captured deep in the Amazon jungle Saturday after a two-month manhunt, a Colombian military spokesman said. Luiz Fernando da Costa was caught following a brief standoff two days after he attempted to flee the region in a private Cessna 206 that was forced down in the middle of the jungle by the Colombian air force.
WORLD
March 28, 2003 | Hector Tobar and Paula Gobbi, Times Staff Writers
Call him "the wandering inmate," or the "prisoner without a cell." Brazilians know him as Fernandinho Beira Mar, or Freddy Seashore. Apparently there is no prison in the country strong enough to hold him for very long. On Thursday, the inmate, whose real name is Luiz Fernando da Costa, walked out of the highest-security prison in Sao Paulo, Brazil's biggest state, where authorities said they could no longer hold him safely.
WORLD
September 13, 2002 | PAULA GOBBI and HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of Brazil's most notorious drug lords surrendered Thursday after taking over parts of a maximum-security prison and killing four rival crime bosses, officials said. Luiz Fernando da Costa smiled widely and sang a tune before he and members of his Red Command crime syndicate released their hostages and turned in their weapons to authorities inside Rio's Bangu I penitentiary.
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