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Luka Bloom

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Luka Bloom came to the Coach House on Tuesday night and put on your average, everyday solo-folkie show--you know, the kind that comes with rap, reggae, laughter, romance, whoops, whispers, and a low E-string vibrating in Sensurround. The Irish singer-songwriter's resourcefulness and versatility enabled him to make a concert of almost two hours seem too short.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"History," wrote Dublin's foremost artistic son, James Joyce, "is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." For Joyce, the Ireland of 100 years ago was so steeped in bitterness, defeatism and religious narrowness born of too much tragic history that he had to escape. He decamped to the Continent and wrote in obsessive detail of the homeland he had left.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"History," wrote Dublin's foremost artistic son, James Joyce, "is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." For Joyce, the Ireland of 100 years ago was so steeped in bitterness, defeatism and religious narrowness born of too much tragic history that he had to escape. He decamped to the Continent and wrote in obsessive detail of the homeland he had left.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"History," wrote Dublin's foremost artistic son, James Joyce, "is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." For Joyce, the Ireland of 100 years ago was so steeped in bitterness, defeatism and religious narrowness born of too much tragic history that he had to escape. He decamped to the Continent and wrote in obsessive detail of the homeland he had left.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One man, one guitar, and an album's worth of good songs. It works for Johnny Cash on his acclaimed new release, "American Recordings." Now comes Luka Bloom with a strong Irish version of music-making at its simplest and most emotionally direct. Bloom's album is titled "Turf," and like Cash's, it is meant to affirm the singer's connection to his national roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
You'd think that a singer who renamed himself Luka Bloom after the characters of Suzanne Vega and James Joyce, respectively--would have more of a sense of humor than Bloom (ne Barry Moore) evidences on "Riverside," his earnestly passionate but not exactly yuk-filled debut album. Luckily, the Gaelic groupies who packed McCabe's for the Irish folk singer's two shows Friday got to hear Bloom in laughter as well as Bloom in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
Luka Bloom is part of a time-honored Irish tradition: When the pickings at home become unbearably lean, look to America. After trying for 10 years to establish himself on the Irish music scene, Bloom found himself in 1986 with an abundance of unfulfilled ambitions and a severe dearth of prospects. "I had been struggling for a long time in Ireland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Irish Never Quit!" say the soap ads, claiming a lusty sweat as the prime birthright of Irishmen ("Arrr, and their woomen too!") as they frolic themselves into a rustic lather. This is pretty much the kind of coverage the Irish get: trivialized stereotypes in commercials--further proud examples being those swillers of St. Paddy's green beer and the Lucky Charms cereal dwarf--and headlines about car bombs and snipings ("The Irish Never Quit!" indeed).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"History," wrote Dublin's foremost artistic son, James Joyce, "is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." For Joyce, the Ireland of 100 years ago was so steeped in bitterness, defeatism and religious narrowness born of too much tragic history that he had to escape. He decamped to the Continent and wrote in obsessive detail of the homeland he had left.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Luka Bloom came to the Coach House on Tuesday night and put on your average, everyday solo-folkie show--you know, the kind that comes with rap, reggae, laughter, romance, whoops, whispers, and a low E-string vibrating in Sensurround. The Irish singer-songwriter's resourcefulness and versatility enabled him to make a concert of almost two hours seem too short.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One man, one guitar, and an album's worth of good songs. It works for Johnny Cash on his acclaimed new release, "American Recordings." Now comes Luka Bloom with a strong Irish version of music-making at its simplest and most emotionally direct. Bloom's album is titled "Turf," and like Cash's, it is meant to affirm the singer's connection to his national roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Irish Never Quit!" say the soap ads, claiming a lusty sweat as the prime birthright of Irishmen ("Arrr, and their woomen too!") as they frolic themselves into a rustic lather. This is pretty much the kind of coverage the Irish get: trivialized stereotypes in commercials--further proud examples being those swillers of St. Paddy's green beer and the Lucky Charms cereal dwarf--and headlines about car bombs and snipings ("The Irish Never Quit!" indeed).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
Luka Bloom is part of a time-honored Irish tradition: When the pickings at home become unbearably lean, look to America. After trying for 10 years to establish himself on the Irish music scene, Bloom found himself in 1986 with an abundance of unfulfilled ambitions and a severe dearth of prospects. "I had been struggling for a long time in Ireland.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
You'd think that a singer who renamed himself Luka Bloom after the characters of Suzanne Vega and James Joyce, respectively--would have more of a sense of humor than Bloom (ne Barry Moore) evidences on "Riverside," his earnestly passionate but not exactly yuk-filled debut album. Luckily, the Gaelic groupies who packed McCabe's for the Irish folk singer's two shows Friday got to hear Bloom in laughter as well as Bloom in love.
NEWS
January 24, 2002
* Bad Religion, "The Process of Belief," Epitaph. The veteran L.A. punk-rock band provides by turns a muscular, melodic and melancholy guide to challenging the norm and making your own rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1999
Carried offstage last month at the Great Western Forum after suffering an ankle injury, Marilyn Manson, right, returns for a special show May 8 at the Universal Amphitheatre. Tickets for those fans holding stubs from the Forum show will go on sale for $14.50 Saturday at the Universal Amphitheatre box office and the Ticketmaster box office, at 6243 Hollywood Blvd.--the original paid adult ticket stub must be surrendered.
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