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Lukas Moodysson

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2002 | Lee Margulies
Roman Polanski's "The Pianist" and Pedro Almodovar's "Talk to Her" were among the nominees announced Thursday for best European film of 2002. The awards, presented by the European Film Academy, will be handed out Dec. 7 in Rome.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Raucous and vibrant, "Hipsters" (Stilyagi) is set in 1955 Moscow, where a group of pre-rock 'n' roll young people fight to wear what they want, listen to what they want, dance how they want and live the lives they want with every bit of the same rebellious passion as the music that's just around the corner. Buying their bright, colorful clothes on the black market, they must try to stay one step ahead of the drab, scissors-wielding government enforcers who look to tone them down and keep them in line.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Raucous and vibrant, "Hipsters" (Stilyagi) is set in 1955 Moscow, where a group of pre-rock 'n' roll young people fight to wear what they want, listen to what they want, dance how they want and live the lives they want with every bit of the same rebellious passion as the music that's just around the corner. Buying their bright, colorful clothes on the black market, they must try to stay one step ahead of the drab, scissors-wielding government enforcers who look to tone them down and keep them in line.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2002 | Lee Margulies
Roman Polanski's "The Pianist" and Pedro Almodovar's "Talk to Her" were among the nominees announced Thursday for best European film of 2002. The awards, presented by the European Film Academy, will be handed out Dec. 7 in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Numerous as tubes of Clearasil are films about teenagers in love, but unusual as an unblemished face are those that get it right. A completely charming reality-based romantic fantasy, both sweet-natured and sympathetic, "Show Me Love" is a leader of the pack. An enormous hit in its native Sweden (where it was that country's official Oscar entry last year), "Show Me Love" casually resists oversimplification.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's a word painted on a been-around VW bus, the name of the collective in Stockholm that jointly owns the vehicle, and the title of this relaxed, intimate, wonderfully clear-eyed and altogether charming Swedish comedy of manners that deals with the accident-waiting-to-happen phenomenon known as communal living.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Dustin Hoffman, Tim Burton and Forest Whitaker are among the celluloid celebs lined up to attend the 50th London Film Festival. The festival opens Oct. 18 with Kevin Macdonald's "The Last King of Scotland," which stars Whitaker as Ugandan dictator Idi Amin. It closes Nov. 2 with Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's multi-stranded saga "Babel," starring Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett and Gael Garcia Bernal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
One of last year's best pictures was Lukas Moodysson's "Lilya 4-ever," in which Oksana Akinshina played a Russian girl in the immediate post-Soviet era who is tricked into becoming a prostitute in Sweden. "Lana's Rain" has a similar plot, and its star's first name is also Oksana, Oksana Orlenko, but the resemblance ends there. It has all the passion, frenzy and violence of an Abel Ferrara film -- but without the vision, depth, style or control.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
There is something remarkable about Lukas Moodysson's ability to keep us in our seats for a movie that's as relentlessly bleak as his latest, "Lilya 4-Ever." That doesn't sound like much of a recommendation, but one of the things that separates real movie lovers from casual admirers is an ability (and a desire) to suck up the hardest-won cinematic pleasures, not just the easiest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Two soldiers knock on a door. When it opens, they deliver the devastating news no one with a loved one in the military ever wants to hear. This scene plays out time and again in "The Messenger," arriving in Los Angeles on Friday, as the film deals with two soldiers assigned the task of telling next of kin their family member has been killed in the line of duty. The film is also a clear-eyed look at a domestic consequence (and administrative mechanism) of war perhaps previously known only to those with first-hand understanding as well as a vehicle for emotionally resonant performances by Ben Foster, Woody Harrelson and Samantha Morton.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
An SUV carrying an Italian couple, an adoption broker and her driver/muscle/lover runs out of gas somewhere in the frozen countryside of northern Russia, near the Finnish border. The Italian woman wears a big white fur hat and an expression at once vulpine and moronic, like a not-terribly-clever fox. The man brims with what seems like a blend of expansionist hauteur and proprietary fondness. "This is the real Russia," he says, and he offers his mechanical services.
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