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Lula Washington

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February 17, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Celebrating the eighth anniversary of her Los Angeles Contemporary Dance Theater, and saluting Black History Month as well, Lula Washington presented an evening of performance and awards Sunday at the Bing Theater, USC. What the dancer-choreographer-director put onstage sustained attention, despite mechanical glitches, a 40-minute delay and speeches, all of which lengthened the event to 3 1/2 hours. Virginia Capers and Larry Carroll hosted the program with wit, grace and urbanity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
Putting together L.A.'s Lula Washington Dance Theatre and New York's Complexions Contemporary Ballet for a shared program was not an obvious pairing. But when the sky darkened, the lights came on and the dancing began outdoors Saturday evening in the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre's sylvan setting, these companies proved a felicitous, complementary couple. Because, at base, the groups' two chief choreographer-artistic directors, Lula Washington and Dwight Rhoden, respectively, are devoted mix masters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Ending a three-year legal battle, Lula Washington Dance Theatre has settled its lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles and the Community Redevelopment Agency over planning and permits for land that used to house its studios in South-Central Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
The Ford Amphitheatre can be magical, especially for dance: The tiered performance area, stone steps and verdant foliage seem to heighten the art form's already ephemeral qualities. When L.A.'s Lula Washington Dance Theatre joins forces with New York-based Complexions Contemporary Ballet on Saturday, the alchemy promises to be potent. As the second and final part of the newly inaugurated Zev Yaroslavsky Signature Series, the pairing of a local troupe with a world-renowned one sounds irresistible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
"I saw a cop a walking down the street, swinging his billie and a strutting his beat. He's gonna catch you, beat you hard, break all of your bones, so help me God." --Children's street song from "Games." Sometimes the only way to get something done is to do it yourself. Choreographer Lula Washington did, and as a result, the repertory of her local troupe now boasts an American modern-dance classic whose survival she has perhaps helped to ensure.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four dancers, scarves waving, undulate to the beat of Nigerian chants. Adding life to the desolate stretch of Pico-Midtown where they are temporarily based, the members of Lula Washington Dance Theatre take their cues from guest instructor Tamara Mobley, seven months pregnant, who more than keeps up with the rest. "Afunga," an African dance of welcome, is part of "Gospel Christmas," a new production created by choreographer Washington that will be performed at Cal State L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
The barren, litter-strewn plot of land on West Adams at Sycamore is the property of the Lula Washington Dance Theatre. Before the 1994 Northridge earthquake, it was the site of a structure the prizewinning choreographer and her company called home. Bought and renovated for nearly $500,000, it represented hard-won stability for the troupe. When officials red-tagged the building, Washington was pushed into temporary digs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
WITH the Southern California real estate market hotter than ever, it's no surprise that everybody wants a piece of the action, including arts organizations looking for permanent homes. But having moved into a new $1.3-million headquarters last year, the 25-year-old Lula Washington Dance Theatre has bigger plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
In the mid-1970s, Lula Washington and two other African American students at UCLA created the Black Dance Assn. in an effort to ensure that their work was seen. The faculty was reluctant to showcase pieces set to R&B, pop and blues, she says, suggesting the more traditional classical music instead. Nearly a quarter-century later, Washington has come full circle--and is taking the advice of her professors.
NEWS
July 16, 1995
Lula Washington is the founder and artistic director of the Lula Washington Dance Theatre/Foundation. Previously known as the L.A. Contemporary Dance Theatre, the organization celebrates its 15th anniversary this year. The studio/school, displaced since last year's earthquake, is struggling for funding that will allow it to return to its 10-year home on La Brea Avenue and Adams Boulevard so it will remain accessible to the community it was founded to serve.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012
Compared with income levels of other artists, dancers' salaries rank near the bottom, according to reports published by the National Endowment for the Arts. The median income for full-time dancers between 2005-2009 (the most recent data available) was $27,392, but less than one-third of all dancers and choreographers fall into that category, the NEA reports. On such income, it's hard for dancers to find decent housing in a city like Los Angeles. Not surprisingly, Ashley Hoffman, Chisa Yamaguchi and Michael Butler all have roommates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010
Lula Washington Dance Theatre Where: Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts When: 8 p.m. Saturday Price: $24 to $48 Contact: (562) 467-8818 or www.cerritoscenter.com Also: May 15 at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex, July 7 with trumpeter Terence Blanchard at the Hollywood Bowl and July 24 at Grand Performances
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010 | By Debra Levine
"There is no gum chewing allowed anywhere inside Lula Washington Dance Theatre," a sign warns on the dance academy's front door. Dwarfed by the big-box retail stores of Crenshaw Boulevard, the unassuming low-rise shell belies its explosive contents -- dance, music, kids, creativity. Enter the House That Lula Built, headquarters for Washington's school and her touring modern dance troupe and a place where you'd better leave fooling around on the sidewalk. Washington, 59, is Los Angeles' best-known African American choreographer, a community organizer and an advocate for the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2008 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The atmosphere was part revival meeting, part history lesson and all energy when the locally based Lula Washington Dance Theatre rattled the stage of Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Theatre on Saturday. And although much of Washington's choreography can be repetitive -- frenzied climaxes build to, well, more frenzied climaxes -- her 11 dancers possess assured technique, unbridled determination and soul aplenty.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
WITH the Southern California real estate market hotter than ever, it's no surprise that everybody wants a piece of the action, including arts organizations looking for permanent homes. But having moved into a new $1.3-million headquarters last year, the 25-year-old Lula Washington Dance Theatre has bigger plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A retrospective allows us to see recurring concerns in an artist's life. In the case of Lula Washington, who was celebrating the 25th anniversary of her Lula Washington Dance Theatre over the weekend at the Harriet and Charles Luckman Theatre at Cal State L.A., those themes were myth and ritual.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1997 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In attempting to create a holiday chestnut she can call her own, choreographer Lula Washington--amid an uncredited set of Christmas tree, palm fronds, spewing clouds of smoke, bales of hay and a swaddle-wrapped doll--has, unfortunately, laid a very un-golden egg. Entitled "Gospel Christmas Suite--1997," a work in progress, this 55-minute opus was to premiere at Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Fine Arts Complex on Friday night, the first day of Kwanzaa.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A retrospective allows us to see recurring concerns in an artist's life. In the case of Lula Washington, who was celebrating the 25th anniversary of her Lula Washington Dance Theatre over the weekend at the Harriet and Charles Luckman Theatre at Cal State L.A., those themes were myth and ritual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
At age 3, Marcella Lewis would put on her dance tights and strive for grace under the watchful eyes of Lula Washington. Now, six years later, the discipline, poise and confidence gained at the Lula Washington Dance Company have translated into top grades and a determination to join the troupe's adult performers when she is old enough. "We brought her here because she's an only child, and we wanted her to have more activities than just school and home," said her mother, Valerie Gilkey.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Talk isn't always the enemy of dance, but it was Friday when Lula Washington Dance Theatre presented a well-executed contemporary program at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre in Hollywood. First, all the greetings, pitches for funds and spoken tributes to Washington and black dance icon Katherine Dunham took so much time that late in the evening, whole sections had to be dumped from Washington's "L.A.
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