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Lumbee Indians

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April 14, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Claiming descent from the fabled English colonists who vanished from Roanoke Island in the 1500s, the proud Lumbee Indians have spent centuries trying to carve a place for themselves between the white man's world and the Indian's. Dutch settlers entering this swampy inland valley in the early 1730s were astonished to discover a tribe of Indians living in wooden houses, practicing Christianity and speaking a form of Elizabethan English.
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NEWS
May 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Slain Lumbee Indian candidate Julian T. Pierce outpolled Joe Freeman Britt in unofficial returns for superior court judge in Robeson County, although by law, the surviving candidate will assume the office in December. The voting on Tuesday was symbolic, and Pierce's supporters said it had meaning to the minority residents' struggle to rid the county of discrimination and corruption. The county's population of about 100,000 is 37% American Indian, 37% white and 26% black.
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NEWS
May 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Slain Lumbee Indian candidate Julian T. Pierce outpolled Joe Freeman Britt in unofficial returns for superior court judge in Robeson County, although by law, the surviving candidate will assume the office in December. The voting on Tuesday was symbolic, and Pierce's supporters said it had meaning to the minority residents' struggle to rid the county of discrimination and corruption. The county's population of about 100,000 is 37% American Indian, 37% white and 26% black.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
Among the Lumbee Indians here, Julian Pierce was described as "the best hope we had." Pierce's candidacy for a Superior Court judgeship marked what many believed would be a turning point for the Indians and blacks who form a two-thirds majority in Robeson County, N. C.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
Among the Lumbee Indians here, Julian Pierce was described as "the best hope we had." Pierce's candidacy for a Superior Court judgeship marked what many believed would be a turning point for the Indians and blacks who form a two-thirds majority in Robeson County, N. C.
SPORTS
March 13, 2002 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oklahoma basketball Coach Kelvin Sampson is a native son from another state. Not many across the country know that Sampson, the onetime Washington State coach who has guided the Sooners to No. 3 in the nation, is a Lumbee Indian from North Carolina. But in Oklahoma, where license plates are emblazoned with a ceremonial shield and the words "Native America," precisely which tribe he hails from is only a detail.
SPORTS
August 6, 2005 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
The National Collegiate Athletic Assn. will ban the use of 18 Native American nicknames and mascots it considers "hostile or abusive" during its postseason tournaments beginning early next year, the organization announced Friday.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Claiming descent from the fabled English colonists who vanished from Roanoke Island in the 1500s, the proud Lumbee Indians have spent centuries trying to carve a place for themselves between the white man's world and the Indian's. Dutch settlers entering this swampy inland valley in the early 1730s were astonished to discover a tribe of Indians living in wooden houses, practicing Christianity and speaking a form of Elizabethan English.
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