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BUSINESS
November 12, 1995
"Still Rolling" (Nov. 4) is yet another version of the Poor Little Logger story that is being continually fed to us by the timber industry. It implies that if only the environmentalists hadn't succeeded in passing their restrictive laws, we'd have more Americans working and more of our timber needs filled. A key component of efforts to reduce harvests in the Northwest has been the evidence that they are not sustainable. Softwood saw timber volume is down 25% since 1952 in the Northwest region.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Southland Lumber & Supply Co., one of the leading suppliers of lumber to the entertainment industry, is shutting down next week after nearly seven decades in business - another casualty of runaway production. The closing of the Inglewood company, founded in 1946, marks the end of an era for one of the industry's oldest vendors, whose customers include Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures. β€œIt has become too difficult to keep going with the big features being taken out of state,” co-owner Johnny Crowell said.
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NEWS
May 21, 1989 | From United Press International and
A shifting load of lumber on a Conrail freight train sent several boards flying through the windshield of a passing Amtrak train Friday, killing an assistant engineer, Amtrak officials said. The victim was identified as P. L. Sylvester, 59, of Kirkville, a suburb of Syracuse. None of the 350 passengers or 17 other crew members on the westbound Lakeshore Limited bound for Chicago was injured, said Amtrak spokesman John Jacobson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Socrates was said to have been the ugliest man in Athens. We don't know much about the great thinker on whom modern philosophy is grounded, but we do have a pretty good notion that he had bulging eyes and a disagreeable nose. He was grubby. He was often barefoot. He must have smelled bad. He was sentenced to death for not recognizing the gods the city recognized and for introducing new ones, as well as for corrupting youth. But he was, no doubt, really executed for being unbelievably annoying.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
An international trade panel rejected Canada's claim that the United States had no basis to impose tariffs on softwood lumber used to build homes but said the duties might be too high. The panel of three American and two Canadian judges, set up under the North American Free Trade Agreement to deal with trade disputes, upheld U.S. claims that Canada subsidizes its timber industry and therefore is subject to tariffs.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1996 | From Reuters
While an East Coast snowstorm shut down trading on New York's commodities exchanges, grain and lumber prices plummeted Monday in Chicago. The grain markets reacted to continued rainfall in South America that has relieved the hot and dry weather that parched crops in Brazil's and Argentina's grain and soybean belts.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From United Press International
A shifting load of lumber on a Conrail freight train sent several boards flying through the windshield of a passing Amtrak train Friday, killing an assistant engineer, Amtrak officials said. They said no one else on the train, which was bound for Chicago, was injured.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2006 | From Reuters
The World Trade Organization's highest court struck down an earlier verdict that the United States had not violated trade rules in asserting that Canadian softwood lumber exports hurt U.S. producers. But the Appellate Body declined to make its own ruling on the legality of the U.S. measures. Canada ships about $6 billion in softwood lumber such as spruce, fir and pine to the U.S. each year. A panel of WTO judges ruled in November that Washington had breached no rules when the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A report released Thursday shows that housing starts nationwide in April hit a two-year high. Southern California housing permits were up nearly 20% in the first quarter. These and other signs are helping to make 1996 look as if it will be the healthiest season for the housing industry in years.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The United States and Canada announced an agreement Thursday to settle a drawn-out and heated trade battle over softwood lumber, a major home-building component. The U.S. timber industry said it could support the accord, but Americans should not expect a price break from the deal when they pay for their new house. The agreement was announced late Thursday at a joint U.S.-Canada news conference at the Canadian Embassy. Canada's share of the U.S.
TRAVEL
June 30, 2013 | By Susan Spano
Astoria, Ore., is tucked near the mouth of the mighty Columbia River where Lewis and Clark came to a weary halt in view of the Pacific Ocean. Fortunes made from fishing and lumber mills lined the town's hilly streets with Victorian flights of fancy, thus the sobriquet "Little San Francisco. " The paint started peeling when the salmon gave out in the 1960s, but Astoria made a stunning comeback, starting with the construction of a 4-mile-long bridge that crosses the river to Washington state.
SPORTS
April 8, 2013 | Kevin Baxter
With the Dodgers' offense stuck in neutral through the first five games of the season, Manager Don Mattingly thought his team could use a little pick-me-up Sunday. So he held four regulars out of the starting lineup, replacing them with four guys who had combined for one hit this year. So guess what happened next. The Dodgers collected season highs for runs and hits in a 6-2 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates in front of a sun-splashed sellout crowd of 52,053 at Dodger Stadium. "You ask for energy from those guys," Mattingly said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
A twisting, breakneck tale of spy craft and betrayal, "The Berlin File" is an action-oriented contemporary espionage thriller in which agents from North Korea and South Korea attempt to outwit and overmatch each other in Berlin while dodging the CIA, Mossad and Arab agents. Written and directed by Ryoo Seung-wan, the film is somehow both nimble and a bit lumbering, as crack set pieces are placed against dense plotting and moments of languorous character development. As an agent from the North (Ha Jung-woo)
BUSINESS
January 1, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Lumber had a good end of the year, with an improving housing market and renewed export demand from China resulting in prices that hit an eight-year high. But lumber futures prices are expected to fall in 2013 as production ramps up, according to Forest Economic Advisors. On Monday, lumber contracts for March delivery were selling at $374.80 per 1,000 board feet on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. That was down 6.1% from last week, when prices surged to almost $400 per 1,000 board feet.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
An improving housing market and renewed export demand from China caused lumber prices to rally to an eight-year high late this year, but lumber futures prices are expected to fall in 2013 as production ramps up, according to Forest Economic Advisors LLC. On Monday, contracts for March delivery of lumber were selling at $374.80 per 1,000 board feet on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. That's down 6.1% from last week when prices surged to almost $400 per 1,000 board feet. Prices skyrocketed in November as lumber sellers with low inventory tried to meet a surge in demand for domestic consumption as the number of housing starts reached a four-year high this year.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Some California lumber sellers are angry about a new state tax on 2-by-4s, plywood and other forest products, and they want to make sure that their customers blame the governor and legislators for the upcoming hike in building costs. The 1% special assessment, proposed by Gov. Jerry Brown and approved in September by lawmakers, is expected to raise $35 million a year to pay for the regulation of commercial forest lands and for firefighting and prevention. Retailers, including home improvement mega stores such as Home Depot and Lowe's and traditional, single-store and small lumberyard chains, call the new tax unfair.
REAL ESTATE
August 5, 2007 | Diane Wedner
Tired of looking at that worn-out deck? Now could be a good time to replace it. Softwood lumber prices were down 10.4% in June, compared with the same time last year, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Producer Price Index. Hardwood lumber was down 1.4%. Prices for oriented strand board were down 37.6%, and gypsum products were down 13.3%. Plywood, however, was 4.2% higher in June than a year ago. Increased labor costs, however, can diminish any savings on materials, experts say.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1988 | JOHN TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
Silvercrest Industries said Friday that it has agreed to sell the assets of its lumber subsidiary to Eadington Cos. in Fullerton for $3.1 million. Silvercrest, a Santa Ana-based manufacturer of mobile and modular homes, said it will receive $1 million in cash plus a $1-million, 5-year note. And Eadington, a private holding company whose operations include a fruit business, will assume the subsidiary's $1.1 million in debt.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Putting that addition on your house is about to get more expensive. On Jan. 1, the state will require buyers of lumber and "engineered" wood products to pay a 1% assessment on the price of such building materials. Retailers and contractors will be required to collect the fee from customers and pass the money, estimated to raise $35 million in the 2013-14 fiscal year, to the state Board of Equalization. The assessment, passed into law as part of the current state budget act, is to fund programs in various state agencies charged with regulating timber harvests and preventing and fighting forest fires.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2012 | By Sue Hobart
The Pittock Mansion, a 16,000-square-foot French Renaissance-style masterpiece, reigns atop a 1,000-foot bluff overlooking the city of Portland, Ore. With panoramic views of the Willamette and Columbia rivers and five Cascade mountains, the mansion is a testament to what power and wealth could achieve in 1914, what civic activism could restore in 1965 and what could be a killer setting for a house party in 2012. Why it's a treasure: Henry Pittock, a penniless Oregon Trail pioneer who became a land baron, lumber and paper mill magnate and owner of the Oregonian, which he built into the state's largest daily newspaper, commissioned California architect Edward T. Foulkes to create a showcase legacy for his five surviving children and their families.
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