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Lumber Industry Japan

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NEWS
July 23, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the rolling green hills south of Olympia, Wash., the forests echo with the sound of chain saws. One after another, the trees are toppled, dragged by cables to the roadside and trucked to the nearby port. The logs are headed for Japan, where buyers in recent months have been willing to pay more for raw logs than they would for lumber cut to their specifications. Curious? Hardly. It is the old law of supply and demand twisted through the strange byways of Japan's distribution system.
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NEWS
December 20, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years ago, Kenji Kawada used to hike through mountain forests to handpick the hinoki cypress trees that he would use to build shrines and temples, without nails, the same way it has been done for centuries. Now, Japan's best cypress is almost gone--or so expensive Kawada usually can't even dream of working with it. He made do with Taiwanese cypress for a while, but now exports of those trees have been banned. This third-generation temple carpenter is running out of wood.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the rolling green hills south of Olympia, Wash., the forests echo with the sound of chain saws. One after another, the trees are toppled, dragged by cables to the roadside and trucked to the nearby port. The logs are headed for Japan, where buyers in recent months have been willing to pay more for raw logs than they would for lumber cut to their specifications. Curious? Hardly. It is the old law of supply and demand twisted through the strange byways of Japan's distribution system.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years ago, Kenji Kawada used to hike through mountain forests to handpick the hinoki cypress trees that he would use to build shrines and temples, without nails, the same way it has been done for centuries. Now, Japan's best cypress is almost gone--or so expensive Kawada usually can't even dream of working with it. He made do with Taiwanese cypress for a while, but now exports of those trees have been banned. This third-generation temple carpenter is running out of wood.
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