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BUSINESS
June 11, 1992
Now is the time to push for the permanent closure of the "roadblocks" that exist on I-5 and I-15. The latest tragedy in Temecula greatly magnifies a daily problem created by the so-called Border Patrol. How many lives have to be lost and how much property destroyed due to the otherwise unemployable cowboys who pose as U.S. officers? There is no way to explain the death of a father and his graduating son. No way! Let's get the Border Patrol back on the border.
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NEWS
June 30, 1988
A strike by thousands of workers against northwest timber companies spread to California, but members of one union, threatened with replacement, returned to work in Bend, Ore. Members of the International Woodworkers of America widened their strike against Simpson Timber Co. to plants in Tacoma, Wash., and Arcata and Korbell, Calif., union officials said. The new walkouts, involving 700 workers, brought to 8,000 the number of lumber mill employees refusing to work in five Western states.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration for the first time Thursday threw its conditional support behind a Northwest timber bill, a labor-industry proposal that would free the government from some environmental restrictions when logging national forests. Deputy Assistant Agriculture Secretary John Beuter and Bureau of Land Management Director Cy Jamison told a Senate panel that the legislation strikes an appropriate balance between ecological and human needs.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992
Now is the time to push for the permanent closure of the "roadblocks" that exist on I-5 and I-15. The latest tragedy in Temecula greatly magnifies a daily problem created by the so-called Border Patrol. How many lives have to be lost and how much property destroyed due to the otherwise unemployable cowboys who pose as U.S. officers? There is no way to explain the death of a father and his graduating son. No way! Let's get the Border Patrol back on the border.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reconsidering the extent of its decision earlier this week, the state Department of Forestry said as many as 8,000 jobs may be lost when it expands protection of spotted-owl habitat to private lands. The rules, similar to those regulating national forests, originally were expected to cost no more than 1,900 jobs. The rules forbid logging that damages owl nests or reduces owl habitat. The U.S.
NEWS
September 17, 1989
Several thousand people attended a peaceful pro-union rally at the Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., to express their support for striking workers at the $535-million expansion of Boise Cascade's paper mill in International Falls. Later, residents of International Falls gathered in Smokey Bear Park for what was called "a peace rally" to show community appreciation for law enforcement personnel and firefighters. Bill Peterson, president of the Minnesota Building Trades Council, told the St.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration for the first time Thursday threw its conditional support behind a Northwest timber bill, a labor-industry proposal that would free the government from some environmental restrictions when logging national forests. Deputy Assistant Agriculture Secretary John Beuter and Bureau of Land Management Director Cy Jamison told a Senate panel that the legislation strikes an appropriate balance between ecological and human needs.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
In casual remarks that could portend serious economic trouble for parts of the Pacific Northwest, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan told federal workers Thursday that he expects the northern spotted owl to be added to the endangered species list next month. If that decision is formally reached by scientists studying the rare bird--the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service insisted that no decision has been made--a U.S.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
The familiar chill of approaching winter is already in the air of this paper-making city deep in Minnesota's North Woods. Their season quickly ending, trees painted the rusty colors of autumn seem to shiver in the breezes. At dawn, frost now coats automobile windshields, and sporting goods stores are crowded with hunters preparing for the approaching deer, bear and duck seasons. But it is not a normal autumn. This year, there is also an unfamiliar chill of fear.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reconsidering the extent of its decision earlier this week, the state Department of Forestry said as many as 8,000 jobs may be lost when it expands protection of spotted-owl habitat to private lands. The rules, similar to those regulating national forests, originally were expected to cost no more than 1,900 jobs. The rules forbid logging that damages owl nests or reduces owl habitat. The U.S.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
In casual remarks that could portend serious economic trouble for parts of the Pacific Northwest, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan told federal workers Thursday that he expects the northern spotted owl to be added to the endangered species list next month. If that decision is formally reached by scientists studying the rare bird--the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service insisted that no decision has been made--a U.S.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he heard the news, Walter Smith, a 40-year-old, second-generation logger, stood with environmentalists and union leaders on the county courthouse steps to attack the major source of his livelihood, Louisiana-Pacific Corp. This "latest assault is the most painful," he said, "since it comes from the very people who should be most concerned for our welfare: our employers. The workers I've talked to feel betrayed."
NEWS
September 17, 1989
Several thousand people attended a peaceful pro-union rally at the Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., to express their support for striking workers at the $535-million expansion of Boise Cascade's paper mill in International Falls. Later, residents of International Falls gathered in Smokey Bear Park for what was called "a peace rally" to show community appreciation for law enforcement personnel and firefighters. Bill Peterson, president of the Minnesota Building Trades Council, told the St.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
The familiar chill of approaching winter is already in the air of this paper-making city deep in Minnesota's North Woods. Their season quickly ending, trees painted the rusty colors of autumn seem to shiver in the breezes. At dawn, frost now coats automobile windshields, and sporting goods stores are crowded with hunters preparing for the approaching deer, bear and duck seasons. But it is not a normal autumn. This year, there is also an unfamiliar chill of fear.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he heard the news, Walter Smith, a 40-year-old, second-generation logger, stood with environmentalists and union leaders on the county courthouse steps to attack the major source of his livelihood, Louisiana-Pacific Corp. This "latest assault is the most painful," he said, "since it comes from the very people who should be most concerned for our welfare: our employers. The workers I've talked to feel betrayed."
NEWS
June 30, 1988
A strike by thousands of workers against northwest timber companies spread to California, but members of one union, threatened with replacement, returned to work in Bend, Ore. Members of the International Woodworkers of America widened their strike against Simpson Timber Co. to plants in Tacoma, Wash., and Arcata and Korbell, Calif., union officials said. The new walkouts, involving 700 workers, brought to 8,000 the number of lumber mill employees refusing to work in five Western states.
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