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Lumber Industry Layoffs

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NEWS
January 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The recent housing slump in California has lowered lumber prices and caused Humboldt County timber companies to lay off employees and consider other cost-cutting measures. Pacific Lumber Co. in Scotia announced Friday it was laying off 23 employees because of modernization at the company and the drop in demand for lumber. Other timber companies in the region are also taking steps to trim costs and brace for tough times. Louisiana-Pacific Corp.
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NEWS
October 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 240 employees of Mendocino County's largest independent sawmill will be temporarily laid off Nov. 1, when the company curtails winter operations. Harwood Products General Manager Art Harwood Jr. blamed the 90-day cutback on rising log costs and slumping lumber prices. "We can't afford to buy the logs to keep us running full-blast through the winter," he said.
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BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year study of changing timber economics in the Pacific Northwest, the Wilderness Society said Wednesday that whole-log exports and automation of mills are more responsible for job losses in the region than restrictions imposed to protect the rare spotted owl. "U.S. timber jobs are lost with every load of whole, unprocessed logs shipped overseas," George T. Frampton Jr., society president, said in releasing the report in Washington.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year study of changing timber economics in the Pacific Northwest, the Wilderness Society said Wednesday that whole-log exports and automation of mills are more responsible for job losses in the region than restrictions imposed to protect the rare spotted owl. "U.S. timber jobs are lost with every load of whole, unprocessed logs shipped overseas," George T. Frampton Jr., society president, said in releasing the report in Washington.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reconsidering the extent of its decision earlier this week, the state Department of Forestry said as many as 8,000 jobs may be lost when it expands protection of spotted-owl habitat to private lands. The rules, similar to those regulating national forests, originally were expected to cost no more than 1,900 jobs. The rules forbid logging that damages owl nests or reduces owl habitat. The U.S.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 240 employees of Mendocino County's largest independent sawmill will be temporarily laid off Nov. 1, when the company curtails winter operations. Harwood Products General Manager Art Harwood Jr. blamed the 90-day cutback on rising log costs and slumping lumber prices. "We can't afford to buy the logs to keep us running full-blast through the winter," he said.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | From United Press International
Champion International Corp. will temporarily close its Roseburg plywood plant Friday for at least two to four weeks due to market conditions, officials said. The 400 employees of the company's only Oregon facility were notified of the closing this week, said Tucker Hill, a Western regional spokesman for Champion in Missoula, Mont. "The price of logs has been going up substantially more than the increase in the price of products, so the gap is widening," Hill said.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
In casual remarks that could portend serious economic trouble for parts of the Pacific Northwest, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan told federal workers Thursday that he expects the northern spotted owl to be added to the endangered species list next month. If that decision is formally reached by scientists studying the rare bird--the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service insisted that no decision has been made--a U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The recent housing slump in California has lowered lumber prices and caused Humboldt County timber companies to lay off employees and consider other cost-cutting measures. Pacific Lumber Co. in Scotia announced Friday it was laying off 23 employees because of modernization at the company and the drop in demand for lumber. Other timber companies in the region are also taking steps to trim costs and brace for tough times. Louisiana-Pacific Corp.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reconsidering the extent of its decision earlier this week, the state Department of Forestry said as many as 8,000 jobs may be lost when it expands protection of spotted-owl habitat to private lands. The rules, similar to those regulating national forests, originally were expected to cost no more than 1,900 jobs. The rules forbid logging that damages owl nests or reduces owl habitat. The U.S.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
In casual remarks that could portend serious economic trouble for parts of the Pacific Northwest, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan told federal workers Thursday that he expects the northern spotted owl to be added to the endangered species list next month. If that decision is formally reached by scientists studying the rare bird--the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service insisted that no decision has been made--a U.S.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | From United Press International
Champion International Corp. will temporarily close its Roseburg plywood plant Friday for at least two to four weeks due to market conditions, officials said. The 400 employees of the company's only Oregon facility were notified of the closing this week, said Tucker Hill, a Western regional spokesman for Champion in Missoula, Mont. "The price of logs has been going up substantially more than the increase in the price of products, so the gap is widening," Hill said.
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