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Lumber Industry Mexico

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BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Mired in a labor dispute with the Mexican government and unions, Louisiana-Pacific Corp. has suspended construction on its huge maquiladora plant near Ensenada and is threatening to pull out of the project altogether. A Louisiana-Pacific spokesman confirmed reports in the Tijuana newspaper El Mexicano that the company has laid off more than 400 construction workers.
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NEWS
May 16, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rivers and streams were withering in the valleys of the harsh Sierra Madre above Mexico's Pacific Coast, and Rodolfo Montiel was convinced that he knew why. The 45-year-old peasant reasoned that, as loggers cut down more of the towering pines in the hills above his village, the barren mountainsides could no longer soak up and store rainwater.
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NEWS
May 16, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rivers and streams were withering in the valleys of the harsh Sierra Madre above Mexico's Pacific Coast, and Rodolfo Montiel was convinced that he knew why. The 45-year-old peasant reasoned that, as loggers cut down more of the towering pines in the hills above his village, the barren mountainsides could no longer soak up and store rainwater.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Mired in a labor dispute with the Mexican government and unions, Louisiana-Pacific Corp. has suspended construction on its huge maquiladora plant near Ensenada and is threatening to pull out of the project altogether. A Louisiana-Pacific spokesman confirmed reports in the Tijuana newspaper El Mexicano that the company has laid off more than 400 construction workers.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Louisiana-Pacific, the nation's second-largest producer of lumber, is in the final stages of negotiations to build a huge lumber processing plant near Ensenada in Baja California, 80 miles south of San Diego. The multimillion-dollar project may signal the start of a new migration of U.S. heavy industry to Mexico in response to liberalized foreign investment laws, observers say. So far, most of the plants that U.S.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he heard the news, Walter Smith, a 40-year-old, second-generation logger, stood with environmentalists and union leaders on the county courthouse steps to attack the major source of his livelihood, Louisiana-Pacific Corp. This "latest assault is the most painful," he said, "since it comes from the very people who should be most concerned for our welfare: our employers. The workers I've talked to feel betrayed."
BUSINESS
March 12, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he heard the news, Walter Smith, a 40-year-old, second-generation logger, stood with environmentalists and union leaders on the county courthouse steps to attack the major source of his livelihood, Louisiana-Pacific Corp. This "latest assault is the most painful," he said, "since it comes from the very people who should be most concerned for our welfare: our employers. The workers I've talked to feel betrayed."
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Louisiana-Pacific, the nation's second-largest producer of lumber, is in the final stages of negotiations to build a huge lumber processing plant near Ensenada in Baja California, 80 miles south of San Diego. The multimillion-dollar project may signal the start of a new migration of U.S. heavy industry to Mexico in response to liberalized foreign investment laws, observers say. So far, most of the plants that U.S.
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