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NEWS
July 14, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Steve Rood was on a last tour through the old Sweet Home Sawmill, hopping down creaking catwalks to look at a cannibalized edging saw. "It is no fun seeing it this way," he said, and sighed. Rood will not have to look for long at the idled mill in the heart of town. Workmen already were busy dismantling the massive old building plank by plank, setting aside the pieces to meet an inglorious end as free firewood.
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NEWS
January 2, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some 200 million years ago, the Pacific sea floor shoved itself beneath the coastal plate, leaving exposed a primeval ocean under a crust of magnesium and iron. Rough shrubs grew. Over the years, hardy cedar and spruce pushed down roots. Today, the serpentine slopes and forested valleys of the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon are a rare window into the ancient past. Some wildflower and tree species trace their roots back further than anything in the U.S. West.
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NEWS
February 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge in Portland, Ore., issued a preliminary injunction blocking all logging in old-growth forests on U.S. Bureau of Land Management property because of danger to the threatened northern spotted owl's habitat. U.S. District Judge Helen Frye issued the injunction in a lawsuit by several environmental groups. The preliminary injunction will block 26 timber sales awarded by the BLM since Dec. 31 and 23 sales scheduled to be offered in February and March.
NEWS
June 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
With a yell of "Hey, Pod!" and a ruffling of tarps, a set of legs suddenly swung out from high in the air. Brian Schulz was in his 12th hour in a "pod" made of a cargo net lashed together with cords hanging about 70 feet above a U.S. Forest Service road--and he wasn't expecting to come down any time soon. He's one of dozens of protesters trying to get logging called off in the Eagle Creek watershed of Mt.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration took a key step Thursday to secure support for its long-term Northwest timber harvest plan, striking an interim deal under which logging would be permitted in some areas of Washington and Oregon that have long been off-limits. Under an agreement reached with environmental groups, the Administration would seek federal court approval to allow the sale of 83 million board feet of lumber from national forests that are home to the endangered spotted owl.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has for the first time blocked sales of timber from federal land considered vital to the survival of the endangered northern spotted owl, a federal spokesman said. The service blocked 52 timber sales by the Bureau of Land Management--nearly half the agency's annual harvest volume in Oregon. Chris West, vice president of the Northwest Forestry Assn., said the action could be a death blow to many mills in western Oregon, where timber sales from U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trumpeting a promising but largely unproven idea, the Forest Service Thursday proposed a logging plan for a remote area of southwestern Oregon that is based on sustaining the forest's complex ecosystem. The 23,000-acre Shasta Costa Creek region of the Siskiyou National Forest, much of it old growth, would become a prototype for the Forest Service's program to promote harvesting by such unorthodox methods as leaving behind a "messy" terrain of live and dead trees and leftover natural debris.
NEWS
May 20, 1988
A federal appeals court in San Francisco has ordered the Bureau of Land Management to refrain from letting new contracts to cut old-growth timber in western Oregon pending further hearings on a lawsuit aimed at protecting the northern spotted owl. Victor Sher, an attorney with the Sierra Club's Legal Defense Fund, said the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments July 19 on the appeal of a district court's dismissal of the case.
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following its own nine-month inquiry, the Agriculture Department's inspector general has determined that laws may have been broken in connection with a high-profile timber theft investigation in Oregon and Northern California, a spokeswoman said. The inspector general turned the matter over to the U.S. attorney's office in Oregon on March 15 "for prosecutorial decisions because we found potential violations," said spokeswoman Nancy Bartel.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Forest Service obstructed an investigation into allegations that Weyerhauser Co. illegally harvested millions of dollars of timber from national forests in Oregon and Northern California, according to two watchdog groups with close ties to agency investigators. Furthermore, the groups contended, the Forest Service quietly acquiesced in the harvesting and has failed to combat large-scale thefts in the nation's vast national forests.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Murray Pacific Corp. had just closed the book on its portentous encounter with three northern spotted owls, whose wing beats in the night had tied up nearly four square miles of rich timberland--about half the firm's salable trees--in a bid to save the threatened bird. For two years, the only sound within 1.8 miles of the owls' known nests was the hooting of biologists seeking to lure and count whatever birds might be lurking in the trees.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration took a key step Thursday to secure support for its long-term Northwest timber harvest plan, striking an interim deal under which logging would be permitted in some areas of Washington and Oregon that have long been off-limits. Under an agreement reached with environmental groups, the Administration would seek federal court approval to allow the sale of 83 million board feet of lumber from national forests that are home to the endangered spotted owl.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Monday extended a ban against U.S. Bureau of Land Management sales of old-growth timber in western Oregon until the agency assesses how logging affects the threatened northern spotted owl. The order appeared likely to halt the sales at least until the middle of next year. U.S. District Judge Helen Frye, who on Feb. 19 granted a temporary injunction against the sales, granted a permanent injunction at the request of groups who sued under federal environmental law.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | STUART WASSERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Cabinet-level committee nicknamed the "God Squad" convenes soon to weigh the future of the northern spotted owl and to decide whether to allow the cutting of timber in its Oregon habitat, one unconventional economic argument it must consider will come down on the side of the owl. University of Oregon economics professor Ed Whitelaw is urging the committee to "put a value on clean air, forested mountains and pristine beaches--a value that has a dollar figure."
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | MARK STEIN, Times Staff Writer
About two dozen demonstrators filed into the Milwaukie, Ore., office of the Times Mirror Land & Timber Co. on Wednesday to protest the sale of wildlife-rich old-growth timber for the lucrative export market. Demonstrator Lydia Avery of Corvallis, Ore., urged the company to spare the grove, near Opal Creek and the Bull of the Woods Wilderness east of Salem, to provide habitat for the rare northern spotted owl and preserve the site of a historic mining claim. Times Mirror Land & Timber Co.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge in Portland, Ore., issued a preliminary injunction blocking all logging in old-growth forests on U.S. Bureau of Land Management property because of danger to the threatened northern spotted owl's habitat. U.S. District Judge Helen Frye issued the injunction in a lawsuit by several environmental groups. The preliminary injunction will block 26 timber sales awarded by the BLM since Dec. 31 and 23 sales scheduled to be offered in February and March.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the imbroglio over a tiny minnow jeopardized a $120-million Tennessee dam, a committee with authority to sweep aside protection of the Endangered Species Act has been impaneled to weigh the future of the northern spotted owl. The Cabinet-level panel, summoned by Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. and nicknamed the "god squad," received its instructions last week.
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