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NEWS
July 24, 1992 | Associated Press
The Senate sent President Bush legislation Thursday night to protect Pacific yew trees, the only source of a promising new cancer drug, from logging in the Northwest. The bill, passed by the House two weeks ago, would require harvesting of the shrublike trees found in the underbrush of old-growth forests before an area can be opened to commercial timber cutting. The Senate approved it on a voice vote Thursday night without dissent.
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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look out the window at the nearest wooden fence, deck, picnic table or playground set. Chances are, it's made from pressure-treated wood, the distinctive, pale green lumber that's a familiar sight in home improvement stores nationwide. The green tint comes from a mixture of chemicals embedded in the wood to ward off termites, rot and fungus. You've probably been exposed to this kind of wood many times without encountering any problems.
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NEWS
April 23, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting the environmental community's increasing polarization over management of national forests, the Sierra Club membership has gone on record opposing all commercial logging on federal lands. The new policy, adopted 2 to 1 in a ballot referendum of the group's more than half a million members, marks an important turning point for the nation's oldest conservation organization--a group that historically has been a moderate advocate for environmental protection.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | Associated Press
The Bush administration asked a federal court Friday to postpone a hearing on former President Clinton's ban on road-building and logging in a third of the nation's federal forests. Environmentalists immediately voiced concern that President Bush was signaling his intention to reverse the regulations Clinton put into place in the final days of his presidency.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
A federal judge in Seattle ordered the U.S. trade representative to name at least one environmentalist to two committees that advise the U.S. government on timber trade policies. The ruling, made Tuesday, was issued in a lawsuit filed by environmental groups charging that the trade committees violated the Federal Advisory Council Act, which requires that panels include a "fair balance of viewpoints."
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | Associated Press
The Bush administration asked a federal court Friday to postpone a hearing on former President Clinton's ban on road-building and logging in a third of the nation's federal forests. Environmentalists immediately voiced concern that President Bush was signaling his intention to reverse the regulations Clinton put into place in the final days of his presidency.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling long sought by environmental groups, the Clinton administration today will announce a ban on construction of new roads and new commercial logging activities in nearly 60 million acres of roadless terrain in the national forests. The rule essentially will prevent any major expansion of logging in the vast national forest system.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking to ease the most contentious environmental issue facing him this campaign year, President Clinton on Saturday called for repeal of a controversial provision in federal logging law that has allowed timber companies to charge back into old forests that had been put off limits. The president made his remarks as he flew here from Long Beach. They reflected an effort to put himself back in the good graces of an important constituency deeply angered by an earlier decision.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate voted to keep special rules in effect to speed logging in national forests, rejecting a plea from President Clinton to restore fish and wildlife protections. Despite intense lobbying by the Clinton administration, the Senate voted, 54 to 42, against repeal of the "timber salvage rider," which the president reluctantly signed into law as part of an emergency spending bill last summer. In a letter, Clinton urged Congress to repeal the provision "as soon as possible."
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | TOM KENWORTHY and DAN MORGAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The House Appropriations Committee on Thursday approved a dramatic escalation in timber cutting on federal land that would be immune to legal challenges under a range of environmental laws. The forest initiative came on a voice vote as the panel worked its way through legislation that cuts $17.1 billion in federal spending approved by previous Democratic Congresses, and appropriates $5.4 billion for disaster relief, Jordanian debt relief and other needs.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling long sought by environmental groups, the Clinton administration today will announce a ban on construction of new roads and new commercial logging activities in nearly 60 million acres of roadless terrain in the national forests. The rule essentially will prevent any major expansion of logging in the vast national forest system.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the most sweeping wilderness protection measures of the last century, the Clinton administration on Monday proposed setting aside 58 1/2 million acres of roadless national forest--banning commercial logging and new road-building in much of the nation's remote back country. In an expansion of the U.S. Forest Service's original proposal, the plan calls for imposing new logging restrictions throughout the national forest system.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a century there has been a direct connection between how many trees are chopped down in federal forests and how much money is spent on students in surrounding school districts. As timber cutting has dramatically declined in recent years, that formula has wreaked havoc on rural school budgets and sparked a passionate debate on whether logs and lesson plans should have anything to do with each other. Bailout legislation passed this month in the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
A federal judge in Seattle ordered the U.S. trade representative to name at least one environmentalist to two committees that advise the U.S. government on timber trade policies. The ruling, made Tuesday, was issued in a lawsuit filed by environmental groups charging that the trade committees violated the Federal Advisory Council Act, which requires that panels include a "fair balance of viewpoints."
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will propose rules today that could more than double the wilderness land protected from mining, logging and other development by banning the building of roads in national forests, White House officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant departure from past practices, federal officials Thursday proposed new regulations for managing the country's national forests that would place a greater emphasis on environmental protection and scientific considerations. The 154-page document would heavily impact California, which has 18 national forests covering substantial chunks of the state.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | Associated Press
Efforts by Western senators to control the U.S. Forest Service reflect their increasing frustration with the Clinton Administration's failure to permit more logging in national forests, Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) said Wednesday. Led by Stevens, the Senate adopted an amendment to an appropriations bill Tuesday night that takes the Forest Service from the oversight of Agriculture Undersecretary Jim Lyons and gives it directly to the secretary of Agriculture.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government ruled Thursday that Canadian lumber shipments are injuring American competitors and upheld penalties that could add $270 to the average nationwide price of a new home and more than $500 in the costly Southern California market. The International Trade Commission, the independent agency handling the penalty phase of trade disputes, agreed with the Commerce Department that the softwood lumber shipments have been improperly subsidized by Canada's provincial governments.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Bear Valley School in Alpine County north of Yosemite National Park isn't supposed to be a one-room schoolhouse, but with seven students and one teacher left, it might as well be. It's not the only country school in trouble. Surrounded by national forest and dependent for nearly 100 years on timber revenue, Alpine County and many similarly situated school districts throughout rural America have become unintended casualties of a revolution in forest policies and practices.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time when low interest rates and a housing boom would have translated into higher prices and a cause for celebration at Sierra Pacific Industries, the Redding, Calif., wood products giant. But instead of popping corks, Sierra Pacific and other U.S. wood products firms are shutting down production lines, trimming jobs and bracing for a further drop in prices that have already plummeted as much as 40% in the last 18 months.
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