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Lumber Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2006 | From Times staff and wire reports
Controversial logging legislation by a San Joaquin Valley congressman would hasten several timber projects in the Sequoia and Sierra national forests, environmentalists say. The plan by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare) has been presented as a way to keep forests healthy and sawmill workers employed. But environmentalists say it threatens vulnerable species, as well as Giant Sequoia National Monument. A House hearing was scheduled for Thursday.
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BUSINESS
July 18, 2006 | Reuters
The U.S. Court of International Trade slapped an injunction on the U.S. government that prevents it from handing over any more duties from Canadian softwood lumber imports to U.S. industry competitors. The ruling, issued Friday, stopped short of reimbursing money already paid out under what is known as the Byrd amendment. Although Canada and the U.S. recently finalized a deal to end a long-standing lumber dispute, the issue of payments made under the Byrd amendment had remained unresolved.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The United States and Canada signed an agreement over the weekend to settle a drawn-out and heated trade battle over softwood lumber, a major home-building component. The deal, details of which were first released April 27, was signed by U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab and her Canadian counterpart, David Emerson, at a ceremony in Geneva, where both were attending World Trade Organization talks.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2006 | Bettina Boxall and Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writers
During tedious days of counting tiny Douglas fir seedlings on blackened slopes west of here, Daniel Donato never imagined his work would put him in the crosshairs of Congress. He was just studying how forests grow back after a fire. But after his research appeared in the online version of the journal Science in January, the Oregon State University graduate student began to feel like a lightning rod.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Despite protests by Gov. Ted Kulongoski and environmentalists, the U.S. Forest Service auctioned off the first timber from a roadless area of a national forest since the Bush administration eased rules on logging. Kulongoski said he would seek a court order blocking the harvest, based on a lawsuit that Oregon, Washington, California and New Mexico have filed challenging the legality of the administration's overhaul of protections for the 58.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The first timber likely to be harvested in a "roadless area" of a national forest since the Bush administration eased logging restrictions goes on the auction block Friday. The U.S.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2006 | From Reuters
The World Trade Organization's highest court struck down an earlier verdict that the United States had not violated trade rules in asserting that Canadian softwood lumber exports hurt U.S. producers. But the Appellate Body declined to make its own ruling on the legality of the U.S. measures. Canada ships about $6 billion in softwood lumber such as spruce, fir and pine to the U.S. each year. A panel of WTO judges ruled in November that Washington had breached no rules when the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
In a case involving Pacific Lumber Co.'s redwood groves, the California Supreme Court on Monday ruled that state water officials have the power to order timber companies to monitor the quality of streams and rivers near logging sites. Pacific Lumber Co. had challenged a state water board order that required it to measure the effects of logging about 700 acres on the south fork of the Elk River in Humboldt County.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Commerce Department said it would meet a Nov. 23 deadline to comply with a NAFTA panel's order that the United States drastically cut its duties on Canadian softwood lumber imports. The panel, created under the North American Free Trade Agreement, is calling on the Commerce Department to all but eliminate punitive duties that average more than 16%. Washington, in defending the duties, has pointed to a preliminary World Trade Organization ruling that the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Monday stopped a logging project in Giant Sequoia National Monument, keeping intact more than 1,000 acres in a preserve that houses two-thirds of the world's largest trees. U.S. District Judge Charles R. Breyer issued a preliminary injunction blocking a timber sale known as the Ice Project, saying that the U.S. Forest Service had ignored extensive research on how commercial logging would affect wildlife in the region. The lawsuit was brought by several environmental groups.
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