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NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service confirmed that it would propose taking the marbled murrelet, a small seabird at the center of political battles over logging in the Northwest, off the threatened species list. The proposal, to be formally made by the end of the year, would start a yearlong evaluation. The bird lives at sea but nests in trees near the coast.
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WORLD
October 15, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush and Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin clashed over U.S. tariffs on Canadian lumber in a 20-minute telephone conversation Friday that culminated in Martin accusing the Bush administration of violating the North American Free Trade Agreement, officials said. When Bush proposed negotiations to resolve the long-standing dispute, Martin flatly rejected that approach. Instead, he vowed to launch a "double dose" campaign -- by suing in U.S.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2005 | From Reuters
The U.S. lumber industry, embroiled in a decades-long trade spat with Canada, said it would challenge the constitutionality of a North American Free Trade Agreement dispute settlement system. The Coalition for Fair Lumber Imports said the NAFTA process, called Chapter 19, made findings appealable only to panels of individuals, some of whom are not U.S. citizens and none of whom is accountable within the U.S. government.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2005 | From Reuters
The United States appealed a World Trade Organization panel ruling Tuesday against U.S. duties on Canadian softwood lumber, and it called for renewed negotiations to resolve the dispute. The WTO case is one of several Ottawa filed after Washington slapped duties on Canadian softwood lumber in March 2002 to offset alleged subsidies and unfair pricing.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Trade tensions between the U.S. and Canada heated up Tuesday after a World Trade Organization panel supported Washington's decision to impose hefty penalties on Canadian softwood lumber firms accused of dumping their products on the U.S. market. The preliminary ruling is the latest twist in a trade war involving Canadian exports of lumber made from Douglas fir, pine and other softwood. The dispute has sent anti-American sentiments soaring north of the border.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court Friday struck down a management plan that allows logging on roadless areas in Alaska's Tongass National Forest, handing environmentalists a victory in a long-running battle over wild lands in the world's largest intact temperate rain forest. In a wide-ranging decision, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a 1997 plan adopted by the U.S.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge has concluded that the Bush administration broke environmental laws last year when it cleared the way for more commercial logging of old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest and Northern California. In 1994, the government adopted environmental protections and limits on timber harvesting -- the Northwest Forest Plan -- to halt the decline of the northern spotted owl and other wildlife that depended on large, old trees.
WORLD
June 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Brazilian police said they had broken up the biggest illegal logging operation in the Amazon with the arrests of 89 people, nearly half of them from the government agency charged with protecting the forests from a gang that has allegedly illegally cut an estimated $370 million in Amazon timber since 1990.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Brazilian Indian tribe armed with bows and arrows and unseen for years has been spotted in a remote Amazon region where clashes with loggers are threatening its existence. The Jururei tribe numbers eight or 10. It is the second "uncontacted" group to be threatened by loggers this month after a judge approved cutting in an area called Rio Pardo. In the most recent scuffles, Jururei Indians set booby traps with spikes, piercing the foot of one logger.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration announced Thursday that it was dropping a wide-ranging Clinton administration rule that had placed nearly a third of the country's national forestland off-limits to road building, logging and oil and gas development. The move was denounced by Democrats and environmentalists and was likely to keep alive a battle over the future of 58.5 million acres of some of the country's most remote and pristine wild lands.
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