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Lumpectomy

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NEWS
November 30, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Settling a nasty controversy over treating early stage breast cancer, newly updated and revised studies involving thousands of women show that the procedure called lumpectomy--cutting out the tumor and minimal adjacent tissue--coupled with radiation therapy, is as effective as removing the entire afflicted breast.
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NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Brachytherapy is an increasingly popular option for women with early-stage breast cancer. After a lumpectomy to remove abnormal tissue, doctors insert either a series of tubes or a catheter attached to a small balloon into the breast. A radioactive source is then delivered to the surgical site, where it can kill off any remaining cancer cells within about 1 centimeter. After five days of treatment, the tubes or catheter can be removed. As this site from UCLA's Department of Radiation Oncology explains, brachytherapy allows doctors to irradiate the breast “from the inside out,” unlike the traditional method of applying radiation to the entire breast with an external beam.
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NEWS
April 20, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a study that experts hope will provide reassurance to thousands of nervous breast cancer patients, UC Irvine researchers have confirmed that lumpectomy--in which only the cancerous tumor, rather than the entire breast, is removed--is just as safe and effective as mastectomy. But, the research found, many women who are eligible for the procedure do not get it.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
TV personality Giuliana Rancic announced Monday she's decided to have a double mastectomy after undergoing a double lumpectomy for breast cancer. Rancic's husband Bill told the "Today" show that despite having the lumpectomies not all cancer cells were eradicated. That prompted the decision to forgo yet another lumpectomy and radiation and try a more drastic approach. Whether or not a woman decides to under go a double, or contralateral, mastectomy depends on a number of factors, said Dr. Gregory Senofsky, breast cancer surgeon and assistant director of the Margie Petersen Breast Center at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
TV personality Giuliana Rancic announced Monday she's decided to have a double mastectomy after undergoing a double lumpectomy for breast cancer. Rancic's husband Bill told the "Today" show that despite having the lumpectomies not all cancer cells were eradicated. That prompted the decision to forgo yet another lumpectomy and radiation and try a more drastic approach. Whether or not a woman decides to under go a double, or contralateral, mastectomy depends on a number of factors, said Dr. Gregory Senofsky, breast cancer surgeon and assistant director of the Margie Petersen Breast Center at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Brachytherapy is an increasingly popular option for women with early-stage breast cancer. After a lumpectomy to remove abnormal tissue, doctors insert either a series of tubes or a catheter attached to a small balloon into the breast. A radioactive source is then delivered to the surgical site, where it can kill off any remaining cancer cells within about 1 centimeter. After five days of treatment, the tubes or catheter can be removed. As this site from UCLA's Department of Radiation Oncology explains, brachytherapy allows doctors to irradiate the breast “from the inside out,” unlike the traditional method of applying radiation to the entire breast with an external beam.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
When she read the news, the patient burst into tears. The story documented flaws in a study that had helped change the course of breast cancer treatment. Results had been falsified. What was worse, the researchers conducting the clinical trial--part of a long-running and extremely important series of breast cancer studies--knew about the doctored data but remained silent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1989
A major study has found that women who underwent a lumpectomy for breast cancer have virtually the same chances to be cancer-free eight years later as those whose breasts were removed, doctors said last week. "It's reassuring for those who have had (lumpectomies to remove a tumor) and are wondering whether they should have undergone a mastectomy," said Dr. Arthur Holleb, a breast cancer expert with the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
An exhaustive audit of a fraud-tainted cancer study has confirmed the original results: Breast cancer is as effectively treated with a breast-saving procedure as with surgery in which the whole breast is removed. A report released Tuesday by a team of experts at the National Cancer Institute concluded that removing the tumor and then treating with radiation is just as likely to result in long-term survival as is mastectomy--removal of the entire breast.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, Associated Press
Whether a woman survives breast cancer with one breast or two depends largely on what hospital she enters and which doctor she sees. At a prestigious cancer hospital in Boston, her surgeon will almost surely remove the diseased lump and spare her breast. At a renowned cancer hospital in New York, the odds are high that he will cut off the whole breast.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Settling a nasty controversy over treating early stage breast cancer, newly updated and revised studies involving thousands of women show that the procedure called lumpectomy--cutting out the tumor and minimal adjacent tissue--coupled with radiation therapy, is as effective as removing the entire afflicted breast.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
An exhaustive audit of a fraud-tainted cancer study has confirmed the original results: Breast cancer is as effectively treated with a breast-saving procedure as with surgery in which the whole breast is removed. A report released Tuesday by a team of experts at the National Cancer Institute concluded that removing the tumor and then treating with radiation is just as likely to result in long-term survival as is mastectomy--removal of the entire breast.
NEWS
May 14, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoag Hospital said Friday that its own 10-year study of those with breast cancer confirms a UC Irvine study that showed lumpectomy, in which only a cancerous tumor is removed, is just as safe and effective as a mastectomy. Hoag's study, analyzing the cases of 875 patients between 1980 and 1990, found a recurrence of breast cancer in less than 1% of the women in the 10 years after lumpectomies with radiation and with mastectomies, in which the entire breast is removed. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994
Recent disclosures that some breast cancer research results were falsified caused anger and fear among many of the millions of women who have undergone treatment for the disease. They will receive badly needed reassurance from a new study, published this week. UC Irvine researchers found that lumpectomies--in which only a cancerous tumor is removed--followed by radiation treatment are as safe and effective as mastectomies, in which the breast and the lymph nodes are removed.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a study that experts hope will provide reassurance to thousands of nervous breast cancer patients, UC Irvine researchers have confirmed that lumpectomy--in which only the cancerous tumor, rather than the entire breast, is removed--is just as safe and effective as mastectomy. But, the research found, many women who are eligible for the procedure do not get it.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
When she read the news, the patient burst into tears. The story documented flaws in a study that had helped change the course of breast cancer treatment. Results had been falsified. What was worse, the researchers conducting the clinical trial--part of a long-running and extremely important series of breast cancer studies--knew about the doctored data but remained silent.
NEWS
May 14, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoag Hospital said Friday that its own 10-year study of those with breast cancer confirms a UC Irvine study that showed lumpectomy, in which only a cancerous tumor is removed, is just as safe and effective as a mastectomy. Hoag's study, analyzing the cases of 875 patients between 1980 and 1990, found a recurrence of breast cancer in less than 1% of the women in the 10 years after lumpectomies with radiation and with mastectomies, in which the entire breast is removed. Dr.
NEWS
March 14, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Treatment of early breast cancer by a "lumpectomy"--surgery that removes the malignant tumor and surrounding tissue--combined with radiation therapy is as effective as total removal of the breast, the far more disfiguring procedure practiced for decades, a major new study released Wednesday concluded. "We know early detection of breast cancer can save a woman's life," Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret M. Heckler declared in a statement.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | From Washington Post
Federal officials and cancer experts worked quickly to reassure American women that despite reports of fraud by one researcher in a major breast cancer study, the findings--that lumpectomy is often just as effective as complete mastectomy in early cancer cases--are still valid. Many officials also expressed astonishment that the fraud, revealed nine months ago, has now triggered a public controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1989
A major study has found that women who underwent a lumpectomy for breast cancer have virtually the same chances to be cancer-free eight years later as those whose breasts were removed, doctors said last week. "It's reassuring for those who have had (lumpectomies to remove a tumor) and are wondering whether they should have undergone a mastectomy," said Dr. Arthur Holleb, a breast cancer expert with the American Cancer Society.
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