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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1996
The waters may be rough on Lunada Bay, but surfing should be smooth at the Palos Verdes Peninsula beach this winter. A longtime turf war between local surfers and outsiders was settled last week and the accord should be approved by a judge next week. Last summer, Geoff Hagins of Torrance and other South Bay surfers filed a lawsuit alleging that the locals who ride the waves off the peninsula had engaged in assaults, vandalism, harassment and "terrorist-like" activities to drive away outsiders.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
A charity that gives prom dresses to needy girls is asking a federal court to protect its name. Becca's Closet is seeking federal trademark protection and is suing Lunada Bay Corp., an Anaheim sportswear maker that uses the brand Becca. The charity was named for Rebecca Kirtman, a 16-year-old girl killed in a car accident last year. Before she died, Rebecca collected about 250 prom dresses and gave them to needy girls across South Florida.
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BUSINESS
April 5, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
Sometimes, when the big companies team up, the little folks get squashed. And Susan Crank doesn't intend to be one of them. The chief executive of Lunada Bay Corp., licensee for Mossimo Inc. swimwear, doesn't know yet just how the new licensing deal between Mossimo and Target Stores will affect her business. But rather than tread water while she waits to find out, Crank is planning to create a new revenue stream by launching Lunada Bay's own swimwear line.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a hectic time at swimwear maker Lunada Bay Corp. and Chief Executive Susan Crank's door is wide open. One employee solicits Crank's opinion on a planned advertisement. The chief financial officer needs her signature on a revised budget. The production director reports that adding spangles to a bikini top will boost the cost of each garment by 80 cents. No one is pausing these days at the Anaheim company.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
A charity that gives prom dresses to needy girls is asking a federal court to protect its name. Becca's Closet is seeking federal trademark protection and is suing Lunada Bay Corp., an Anaheim sportswear maker that uses the brand Becca. The charity was named for Rebecca Kirtman, a 16-year-old girl killed in a car accident last year. Before she died, Rebecca collected about 250 prom dresses and gave them to needy girls across South Florida.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a hectic time at swimwear maker Lunada Bay Corp. and Chief Executive Susan Crank's door is wide open. One employee solicits Crank's opinion on a planned advertisement. The chief financial officer needs her signature on a revised budget. The production director reports that adding spangles to a bikini top will boost the cost of each garment by 80 cents. No one is pausing these days at the Anaheim company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1991 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George, a 42-year-old surfer from Torrance, compares the surfers at Lunada Bay in Palos Verdes Estates to a street gang--staking out turf, terrorizing the innocent, trashing private property. "Typical punk behavior," he says. Erick, a surfer from Manhattan Beach, likens the Lunada Bay situation to a "territoriality-type of thing, like an animal marking its place." John, another surfer from Manhattan Beach, says it boils down to a group of selfish rich kids out to make trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1991 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George, a 42-year-old surfer from Torrance, likens the surfers at Lunada Bay in Palos Verdes Estates to an inner-city youth gang staking out its own turf, terrorizing the innocent and trashing private property. "It's typical punk behavior," he says. Erick, a surfer from Manhattan Beach, calls the situation with the surfers there a "territoriality-type of thing, like an animal marking its place."
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter McCullom, a member of the feared Bay Boys of Palos Verdes Estates, stood beside one of the best surfing spots in Southern California and explained the law of Lunada Bay. The law is as simple as a smack in the face: If you don't live here, don't surf here. Not if you know what's good for you. "Everybody knows to stay away from Lunada Bay because they'll get hassled," said McCullom, 34, a Palo Verdes "local" who lives on an inheritance and spends his days surfing and traveling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991
Southern California's surf scene has a long history of turf problems. From Santa Barbara to San Clemente, surfers stake out favorite beaches and return to them with a fervent regularity akin to religious pilgrimage. That's fine, but sometimes surfers push their loyalty to a particular place beyond acceptable bounds, using intimidation, vandalism and even violence to keep strangers away from "their" beach.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a hectic time at swimwear maker Lunada Bay Corp. and Chief Executive Susan Crank's door is wide open. One employee solicits Crank's opinion on a planned advertisement. The chief financial officer needs her signature on a revised budget. The production director reports that adding spangles to a bikini top will boost the cost of each garment by 80 cents. No one is pausing these days at the Anaheim company.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
Sometimes, when the big companies team up, the little folks get squashed. And Susan Crank doesn't intend to be one of them. The chief executive of Lunada Bay Corp., licensee for Mossimo Inc. swimwear, doesn't know yet just how the new licensing deal between Mossimo and Target Stores will affect her business. But rather than tread water while she waits to find out, Crank is planning to create a new revenue stream by launching Lunada Bay's own swimwear line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1996
The waters may be rough on Lunada Bay, but surfing should be smooth at the Palos Verdes Peninsula beach this winter. A longtime turf war between local surfers and outsiders was settled last week and the accord should be approved by a judge next week. Last summer, Geoff Hagins of Torrance and other South Bay surfers filed a lawsuit alleging that the locals who ride the waves off the peninsula had engaged in assaults, vandalism, harassment and "terrorist-like" activities to drive away outsiders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dude! It's like they say in real estate--location, location, location. So a bunch of South Bay surfers trucked down to Lunada Bay on Sunday afternoon, vowing to "take back the bay" from the locals who surf there regularly. In aged Rambler station wagons and shiny new Toyota 4Runners, they formed a caravan half a mile long that snaked down the shore from Torrance toward the bay in Palos Verdes Estates.
OPINION
May 14, 1995
With great pleasure and a welcome sense of relief I read your article exposing the menacing gangs of Lunada Bay in Palos Verdes Estates (May 8). I grew up in Palos Verdes and learned to surf at Malaga Cove. At the age of 15 I essentially gave up my dream of surfing the better breaks in Palos Verdes because I didn't want to be involved in the hazing, violence and vandalism necessary for acceptance into the Bay Boys. Recently, one of my Japanese ESL students, 32, went out to "Indicator" (PV Cove)
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter McCullom, a member of the feared Bay Boys of Palos Verdes Estates, stood beside one of the best surfing spots in Southern California and explained the law of Lunada Bay. The law is as simple as a smack in the face: If you don't live here, don't surf here. Not if you know what's good for you. "Everybody knows to stay away from Lunada Bay because they'll get hassled," said McCullom, 34, a Palo Verdes "local" who lives on an inheritance and spends his days surfing and traveling.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a hectic time at swimwear maker Lunada Bay Corp. and Chief Executive Susan Crank's door is wide open. One employee solicits Crank's opinion on a planned advertisement. The chief financial officer needs her signature on a revised budget. The production director reports that adding spangles to a bikini top will boost the cost of each garment by 80 cents. No one is pausing these days at the Anaheim company.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
OP Licensee on the Move: Lunada Bay Corp., one of the major licensed makers of sportswear for troubled Ocean Pacific Sunwear Ltd., is moving its headquarters to gain some growing room. The company will move in August to a new 36,000-square-foot facility in Commerce, leaving behind its 27,000-square-foot quarters in Anaheim, said Susan Crank, president of the company. Lunada Bay is also expanding its license for OP's line.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
OP Licensee on the Move: Lunada Bay Corp., one of the major licensed makers of sportswear for troubled Ocean Pacific Sunwear Ltd., is moving its headquarters to gain some growing room. The company will move in August to a new 36,000-square-foot facility in Commerce, leaving behind its 27,000-square-foot quarters in Anaheim, said Susan Crank, president of the company. Lunada Bay is also expanding its license for OP's line.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992 | Danny Garcia, EDITED BY MARY McNAMARA
The Crips and Bloods may rule the streets, but the Lunada Bay Pirates rule the waves. Ask any surfer from San Diego to Santa Cruz if he or she would dare trespass on the gang's turf and the answer is a resounding "No way, dude!" One Huntington Beach surf rider who attempted to run the Pirate gantlet on a dare remembers never "even making the trail head. Halfway there, they hosed me down with bad vibes and I split." Bad vibes?
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