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Lunar Eclipse

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October 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
On Friday evening, the moon will pass through the hazy outer shadow of the Earth, and if you look carefully, you may be able to see the minor celestial show. The event is called a penumbral eclipse, and, to be fair, it is not especially dramatic. The outer shadow of the Earth known as the penumbra is not dark enough to fully obscure the moon; instead it will just sort of darken it a bit. PHOTOS: Moons of the solar system Here in Southern California, your window of opportunity to witness the minor lunar eclipse will be fairly short.
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SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
On Friday evening, the moon will pass through the hazy outer shadow of the Earth, and if you look carefully, you may be able to see the minor celestial show. The event is called a penumbral eclipse, and, to be fair, it is not especially dramatic. The outer shadow of the Earth known as the penumbra is not dark enough to fully obscure the moon; instead it will just sort of darken it a bit. PHOTOS: Moons of the solar system Here in Southern California, your window of opportunity to witness the minor lunar eclipse will be fairly short.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amy Bruchmann came for the colors. Susan Ambriz wanted to see something she had never seen and wouldn't see again until 2000. And Jessica Hodes said she was just awed by the enormity of the experience. "The universe is so big and there's so much in it that no one knows about. This is awesome," Hode, 18, said as she stood on the softball field at Orange Coast College and stared up at the total eclipse of the moon.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The penumbral lunar eclipse has started and is visible on a live stream courtesy of Slooh, a community observatory that makes live images available to the broader public. The live stream offers a bit of solace to U.S. West Coast residents who will have only about a 20-minute window to catch the subtle shading of the moon as it passes through Earth's outer shadow, or penumbra. The moon will pass deepest into the penumbral shadow at 4:50 p.m. PDT, well before sunset on the West Coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pull out your telescopes, binoculars and cameras, or simply point your eyes upward Sunday night, and get ready to be moonstruck. The moon, Earth's closest neighbor, will stage another spectacular show Sunday when it slides behind the Earth's shadow to create a total lunar eclipse. The eclipse--created by the alignments of the sun, Earth, and moon--will be visible from any point in Orange County not illuminated by urban night light, as long as the sky remains clear of clouds.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Weather and volcanic dust permitting, Southern Californians will be able to see the moon rise partially in Earth's shadow tonight as the East Coast glimpses the first total lunar eclipse visible in North America since 1989. When the moon pops above the northeast horizon in Los Angeles at 4:41--three minutes before sunset--a shadow should still be covering its northeastern part.
SCIENCE
April 25, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
A partial lunar eclipse will occur Thursday and you can watch it live, right here, beginning at noon Pacific time. But, be forewarned: This lunar eclipse, the first of 2013, is expected to be spectacularly unspectacular. NASA describes it as a " barely partial eclipse " because less than 1.5% of the moon will be darkened by Earth's shadow. Also, the eclipse will last for just 27 minutes, making it one of the shortest lunar eclipses of the century. Unfortunately, my fellow North Americans won't be able to see this short and subtle eclipse by looking up at the night sky because it takes place during our daylight hours when the moon is less visible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | NONA YATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A total eclipse of the moon will be visible across Southern California tonight. Those with a view of the eastern horizon near sunset will be treated to the haunting sight of the rising harvest moon--the full moon closest to the autumn equinox--in partial eclipse, its lower left half "missing." From Orange County, the partially eclipsed moon will rise at 6:37 p.m. At 6:44, the sun will set. The moon will be fully eclipsed from 7:19 to 8:29 p.m.
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | Associated Press
North and South America will be treated Sept. 26 to a total lunar eclipse. "The big questions at this eclipse are how dark the moon is going to get and what colors it's going to show," said Alan MacRobert, an editor at Cambridge-based Sky & Telescope magazine. When fully eclipsed, the moon will dimly glow orange-red or red-brown, depending on the amount of dust in the stratosphere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1993 | SCOTT HADLY
Weather permitting, Ventura County residents will be able to see the eerie orange glow of the moon at full lunar eclipse Sunday night for the first time since 1982. Astronomers say the event, though not as rare as a solar eclipse, is much more beautiful. As the moon dips into the innermost part of the Earth's shadow--the umbra--its pale gray glow will change to an orange copper color.
SCIENCE
April 25, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
A partial lunar eclipse will occur Thursday and you can watch it live, right here, beginning at noon Pacific time. But, be forewarned: This lunar eclipse, the first of 2013, is expected to be spectacularly unspectacular. NASA describes it as a " barely partial eclipse " because less than 1.5% of the moon will be darkened by Earth's shadow. Also, the eclipse will last for just 27 minutes, making it one of the shortest lunar eclipses of the century. Unfortunately, my fellow North Americans won't be able to see this short and subtle eclipse by looking up at the night sky because it takes place during our daylight hours when the moon is less visible.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Sky watchers, it is time to look up once again, and watch the moon very, very carefully. A penumbral lunar eclipse will occur early Wednesday morning, but it will be subtle. Unlike a total lunar eclipse, when the moon passes behind the dark center of the earth's shadow, a penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the hazy outer edge of the earth's shadow, called the penumbra. During a penumbral eclipse, the moon doesn't so much black out completely as darken subtly, but noticeably, if you are paying attention.  Quiz: What set the Internet on fire in 2012?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The paparazzi staked out a spot in the Hollywood Hills before dawn. The western sky was the red carpet, the moon the day's celebrity. That was the scene early Saturday at the Griffith Observatory, where several hundred people gathered in the dark with binoculars, cameras and telescopes to watch a total lunar eclipse — the last one until 2014. "It's a celestial festival out here," Capm Petersen, 39, said as he set up his camera before the big event. The crowd began gathering on the observatory's lawn shortly after 4 a.m. in anticipation of "totality" — the moment when the Earth fully blocks the sun, leaving the moon in its shadow.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A total eclipse of the moon will be visible throughout North and Central America from 11:41 p.m. PST Monday until 12:53 a.m. Tuesday, the first such eclipse in almost three years. Weather permitting, observers will see the moon enter the Earth's inner shadow, or umbra, at 10:33 p.m., with a red-brown shadow creeping across the bright moon. This shadow has a curved edge, a fact that was taken as proof to at least some ancients that the Earth is round. The sky will get darker as the shadow progresses across the moon, and more stars will be visible as sunlight reflected from the moon fades.
WORLD
March 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The moon darkened, reddened, and turned shades of gray and orange during the first total lunar eclipse in nearly three years, thrilling stargazers and astronomers around the world. The Earth's shadow took over six hours to crawl across the moon's surface, eating it into a crescent shape before engulfing it completely in a spectacle at least partly visible on every continent. The moon began moving out of Earth's shadow just after 5 p.m. PST. The eclipse ended a little more than an hour later.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The moon will turn shades of amber and crimson tonight as it passes behind Earth's shadow in the first total lunar eclipse in three years. The eclipse will be at least partly visible from Asia to the Americas, although those in Europe, Africa and the Middle East will have the best view. Earth's shadow will begin moving across the moon at 12:18 p.m. PST, with the total eclipse occurring at 2:44 p.m. PST and lasting more than an hour.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Sky watchers, it is time to look up once again, and watch the moon very, very carefully. A penumbral lunar eclipse will occur early Wednesday morning, but it will be subtle. Unlike a total lunar eclipse, when the moon passes behind the dark center of the earth's shadow, a penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the hazy outer edge of the earth's shadow, called the penumbra. During a penumbral eclipse, the moon doesn't so much black out completely as darken subtly, but noticeably, if you are paying attention.  Quiz: What set the Internet on fire in 2012?
NATIONAL
November 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Sky-watchers in every continent but Australia reveled in the relative rarity of a total lunar eclipse Saturday night -- but as stargazers have noted for centuries, it was a matter of celestial perspective. "From the moon, they're having a solar eclipse," said Dean Regas, an astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory Center, which was founded in 1842 and claims to be the oldest in the U.S.
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