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Lunar Eclipses

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1989 | BEN SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
Though better known for stars of the big screen than those in the sky, Los Angeles had more than its share of amateur astronomers Wednesday night as the city got its first good look at a lunar eclipse in years. More than 500 people from all over Los Angeles and Orange counties converged on Griffith Park to watch the eclipse through the observatory's 12-inch refracting telescope and through a dozen smaller telescopes set up on the lawn.
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SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | Deborah Netburn and Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the total lunar eclipse known as a "blood moon. " Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles offered a prime view, and hundreds of people were there when the eclipse began at 10:58 p.m. Monday. The full moon was beginning to move into Earth's shadow, leaving the impression that someone had taken a bite out of it. As the minutes passed, the shadow spread across more and more of the lunar surface.
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SCIENCE
March 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The moon will turn shades of amber and crimson tonight as it passes behind Earth's shadow in the first total lunar eclipse in three years. The eclipse will be at least partly visible from Asia to the Americas, although those in Europe, Africa and the Middle East will have the best view. Earth's shadow will begin moving across the moon at 12:18 p.m. PST, with the total eclipse occurring at 2:44 p.m. PST and lasting more than an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
The crowd packed on the grassy lawn of Griffith Observatory erupted in whistles, cheers and howls shortly before 12:05 a.m. on Tuesday as a darkened moon transformed into an orange "blood moon" for the start of a total lunar eclipse. Visitors scrambled toward the front of the observatory, pointing up at the reddening moon. Telescopes dotting the lawn pointed upward and southward, as the moon hovered above. Around 11 p.m., a "bite" began to spread across the moon as the Earth blocked direct light from the sun, casting a shadow on the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1998 | SUE FOX
Budding astronomers are invited to check out a partial lunar eclipse and munch some toasted marshmallows tonight at Malibu Creek State Park. Steve Killgore, a park docent, will explain the "geometry and history" of eclipses. "Around the time the sun sets, the corner of the moon is going to be a little bit dimmed," Killgore said. The event is not a major eclipse, but it is one of several due in the coming months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amy Bruchmann came for the colors. Susan Ambriz wanted to see something she had never seen and wouldn't see again until 2000. And Jessica Hodes said she was just awed by the enormity of the experience. "The universe is so big and there's so much in it that no one knows about. This is awesome," Hode, 18, said as she stood on the softball field at Orange Coast College and stared up at the total eclipse of the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The moon will be in partial eclipse on Thursday night, but don't expect a celestial show. John Mosley, an astronomer at Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, said the moon will move only through the outer, or penumbral, part of the earth's shadow and will not darken noticeably. "Even with photographic or photometric equipment, it will be hard, if not impossible, to notice that an eclipse is happening," Mosley said. The partial eclipse will begin at 6:46 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | K.C. COLE and JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a close race Thursday between the low clouds creeping up from the south and the rose-gray moon trying to rise above it all in the sky. In the end, the clouds won, and the moon took an early exit from its own party. But none of the 4,000 moon worshipers gathered at Griffith Observatory to see the last total lunar eclipse until 2000 seemed to mind. On the observatory lawn, a circle of meditators swayed and chanted. Lovers cuddled.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Weather and volcanic dust permitting, Southern Californians will be able to see the moon rise partially in Earth's shadow tonight as the East Coast glimpses the first total lunar eclipse visible in North America since 1989. When the moon pops above the northeast horizon in Los Angeles at 4:41--three minutes before sunset--a shadow should still be covering its northeastern part.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1993 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the light of the silvery moon, Bob Brown set up shop Sunday night, positioning his refracting telescope ever so carefully to make the lunar eclipse come alive. For amateur astronomers, Sunday was no evening to miss, and at age 74, Brown was not sure he was going to see another like it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the "blood moon," the first full lunar eclipse of 2014. Hundreds converged on Griffith Observatory, which has a prime view. Here are some photos of the eclipse posted to various social media from the observatory on Tuesday morning:  [<a href="//storify.com/shelbygrad/full-lunar-eclipse-capturing-blood-moon-live" target="_blank">View the story "Full lunar eclipse: Capturing 'blood moon' live" on Storify</a>]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Those who slept through the rare "blood moon" Monday night missed more than just the rare red hue, as a packed Griffith Observatory erupted into whistles, cheers and howls during the much-anticipated lunar eclipse. The crowds descended upon the observatory early, with hundreds of people lounging on the lawn hours before the eclipse was set to begin at about 11 p.m. The observatory and the Los Angeles Astronomical Society, as well as other astronomy clubs and organizations, offered telescopes for viewers. As forecasters had predicted, clear skies made for for prime viewing conditions across the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Alicia Banks and Rong-Gong Lin II
You don't have to go to the Griffith Observatory or other prime watching spot to view the first total lunar eclipse of 2014. Numerous "blood moon" video streams are available on the Web. The Griffith Observatory will be streaming the event live from the Zeiss dome beginning at 9:45 p.m. The Slooh Observatory in the Canary Islands will also be doing a live stream. NASA is also planning a live stream , with experts taking questions from viewers. For those who want to take in the event in person, Griffith Observatory decided to open its doors Monday (it's usually closed)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Alicia Banks and Rong-Gong Lin II
With just a few hours left before the the first total eclipse of 2014, the Griffith Observatory is bracing for big crowds tonight and is warning of possible traffic jams for the "blood moon. " "We are expecting large crowds," the observatory said in a statement. "Those attending should expect traffic congestion and long walks from parking. " The observatory will be open to visitors, who can look up at the eclipse either from the building itself or from the grass and sidewalk areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Alicia Banks
Officials at the Griffith Observatory are expecting big crowds for the dark red "blood moon," the first total eclipse of 2014 beginning Monday night. The observatory will be open for visitors, who can look up at the eclipse either from the building itself or from the grass and sidewalk areas. Experts will also provide presentations on the eclipse. The hours of operation are 7 p.m. to 1:45 a.m. It is also expected that people will flock to other areas where they can see the eclipse, including mountain and desert areas with less light pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
The first lunar eclipse of 2014 - known as "blood moon" - is lighting up social media tonight as people post photos of the moon and the eclipse. Large crowd descended on the Griffith Observatory to look at the eclipse. They posted a variety of photos on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Here is a sampling:   In Los Angeles, the most impressive part began around 11 p.m. when the first "bite" is taken out of the moon. It will be blotted out entirely by 12:06 a.m. Tuesday, said experts at the observatory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2000
The first total lunar eclipse visible in Orange County since 1996 will glow brick red Thursday night high in the crisp winter sky between 6-10 p.m. Unlike solar eclipses, lunar events are safe to watch with the naked eye. Blocking Out the Sun During the eclipse, the full Moon passes through the Earth's shadow. A full eclipse - called totality - includes a partial eclipse before and after the main event.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Southern Californians with a clear view of the southeastern horizon will have the opportunity to view a partial eclipse of the moon shortly after sunset Sunday. The eclipse will block 69% of the moon's surface when it reaches its maximum at 9:57 p.m. PDT, about halfway through the three-hour, easily visible portion of the eclipse. Weather permitting, the phenomenon will be visible from most areas of North, South and Central America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
The first total eclipse of 2014 tonight and Tuesday morning is generating much attention. Times reporter Rong-Gong Lin II answers your questions about the so-called blood moon. Q: Will L.A. be able to see this eclipse? It will be the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. The last one began the evening of Dec. 20, 2010, with the eclipse's peak at 12:17 a.m. Dec. 21, according to the observatory. Q: When is the best time to watch?
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