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BUSINESS
April 8, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A team of prominent Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are shooting for the moon with a new private venture aimed at scouring the lunar surface for precious metals and rare metallic elements. The private company Moon Express Inc., or MoonEx, is building robotic rovers alongside scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center northwest of San Jose. MoonEx's machines are designed to look for materials that are scarce on Earth but found in everything from a Toyota Prius car battery to guidance systems on cruise missiles.
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SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Amina Khan
NASA's LADEE mission ended with a bang when the spacecraft crashed into the lunar surface Thursday. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer smashed into the dark side of the moon between 9:30 and 10:22 p.m., according to NASA officials. The vending-machine-sized spacecraft ran out of fuel and collided with the moon at a speed of roughly 3,600 miles per hour -- or “about three times the speed of a high-powered rifle bullet,” Rick Elphic, LADEE project scientist at NASA Ames Research Center said in a statement.
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NATIONAL
March 22, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
Rising over the battered surface of the moon, Earth loomed in a shimmering arc covered in a swirling skin of clouds. The image, taken in 1966 by NASA's robotic probe Lunar Orbiter 1, presented a stunning juxtaposition of planet and moon that no earthling had ever seen before. It was dubbed the Picture of the Century. "The most beautiful thing I'd ever seen," remembered Keith Cowing, who saw it as an 11-year-old and credited it with eventually luring him to work for NASA.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Sky watchers, get ready! There is a total eclipse of the moon coming Monday night and you don't want to miss it. A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, moon, and Earth align so that  Earth's shadow falls across the moon's surface. Monday night's lunar eclipse is a total eclipse, which means  Earth's shadow will cover the moon completely. The moon won't be blacked out by our planet's shadow. Instead, it will take on a reddish hue -- anywhere from a bright copper to the brownish red of dried blood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
Re "Promising the Moon--for $15.99," June 23: Sorry, Dennis Hope, you're 35 years too late in claiming the moon! My name and about 40 others have been staked on the lunar surface since the early '60s. While working at Pasadena's JPL on the Ranger project, we had the names of all the system test team inscribed on gold-plated shims, which were installed on the Ranger spacecraft. It was designed to impact the lunar surface after sending back TV pictures for the Apollo landing sites.
WORLD
September 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Europe's first spacecraft to the moon ended its three-year mission today by crashing into the lunar surface in a volcanic plain called the Lake of Excellence, to a round of applause in the mission control room in Germany. Hitting at 1 1/4 miles per second, the impact of the SMART-1 spacecraft was expected to send a cloud of dust and debris miles above the surface. Scientists hoped the cloud would provide clues to the geologic composition of the site.
SCIENCE
February 16, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British and U.S. scientists said Friday that they were exploring plans for a joint lunar mission that would fire missile-like penetrators into the moon's surface. The Moon Lightweight Interior and Telecoms Experiment, or MoonLITE, would put a satellite into orbit around the moon. Three or four projectiles packed with scientific instruments would then be fired and embed just below the lunar surface, the British National Space Center and NASA said. MoonLITE could deliver important information about the moon's structure, such as the size of the lunar core and the source of lunar seismic activity.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Astronauts left behind more than an American flag when they left the moon. NASA revealed this week photographs of a variety of space leftovers including moon rovers and footprints that remain visible almost 50 years later. A NASA spacecraft, dubbed Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, zooming as low as 13 miles above the moon's surface has captured some of the sharpest images ever taken of the moon landing sites. NASA's Apollo moon landing missions took place from 1969 to 1972.
SCIENCE
September 2, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Europe's first mission to the moon is due to crash-land in a cloud of dust and rock late today, ending a three-year voyage that gathered data about the lunar surface and tested a new engine intended to propel spacecraft to Mercury and other planets. The European Space Agency's SMART-1, orbiting lower and lower as it makes its final approach at 4,475 mph, should hit its target on a volcanic plain called the Lake of Excellence at 10:41 p.m. PDT.
WORLD
June 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Japan's first lunar probe made a controlled crash landing on the moon, successfully completing a 19-month mission to study the Earth's nearest neighbor, Japan's space agency said. The remotely controlled satellite, named after the folklore princess Kaguya, had been orbiting the moon to map its surface and study its mineral distribution and gravity levels. "The mission was a success. Thanks to Kaguya, we will have a very detailed map of the lunar surface," said spokesman Shinichi Sobue of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.
SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | By Amina Khan
For a brief moment last September, a flash on the moon shone about as bright as the North Star, Polaris,  giving away the biggest crash from a space rock hitting the lunar surface ever caught on camera, astronomers say. The discovery -- "the brightest and longest confirmed impact flash," according to the study authors -- was detailed in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and reveals that perhaps 10 times as many small rocky bodies...
SCIENCE
January 27, 2014 | By Amina Khan
China's Jade Rabbit moon rover experienced a “mechanical control abnormality” over the weekend, according to the official Xinhua news agency, just as it was set to go to "sleep" for the long lunar night. "Goodnight, Earth. Goodnight, humans. " Those were the words in a "first-person" account from the rover's perspective that was published in Chinese state media after the robot experienced some troubling technical difficulties. Officials with China's State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said scientists are now organizing an overhaul, according to state-run CCTV . China's Chang'e 3 spacecraft made headlines last month after becoming the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the lunar surface in nearly four decades . The last one before that was the Soviet Union's Luna 24 mission, sent to collect samples in 1976.
SCIENCE
September 6, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Video streaming by Ustream NASA is sending a spacecraft to the moon Friday night, and you can watch as it leaves our planet, live, right here. If all goes according to schedule, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer -- LADEE, for short -- will blast off at 8:27 p.m. PDT. NASA will stream the launch live, and you can watch it in the video box above. If all does not go according to plan, NASA said it will try again over the weekend. While recent lunar missions have studied the moon's surface, and its uneven gravity, LADEE has been outfitted with a suite of instruments to help scientists learn more about the little-known lunar atmosphere.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By David Lazarus
I know, I know: It's so hard to find just the right holiday gift for some people. So how about a trip to the moon? All you'll need is $750 million per ticket. But you'll have to book two tickets at a time, meaning that you'll be writing a check for $1.5 billion. A bargain, right? The lunar excursion is being offered by start-up company Golden Spike , which says it's "the first company planning to offer routine exploration expeditions to the surface of the moon. " Yeah, not a whole lot of competition on this front quite yet. Golden Spike plans to get a hold of existing space gear and repurpose it for commercial missions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson and Eric Malnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Neil Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the moon, on July 20, 1969, he uttered a phrase that has been carved in stone and quoted across the planet: "That's one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind. " The grainy black-and-white television images of him taking his first lunar stroll were watched by an estimated 600 million people worldwide - and firmly established him as one of the great heroes of the 20th century. Armstrong, who had heart surgery in early August, died Saturday in Cincinnati at 82, said NASA spokesman Bob Jacobs.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Astronauts left behind more than an American flag when they left the moon. NASA revealed this week photographs of a variety of space leftovers including moon rovers and footprints that remain visible almost 50 years later. A NASA spacecraft, dubbed Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, zooming as low as 13 miles above the moon's surface has captured some of the sharpest images ever taken of the moon landing sites. NASA's Apollo moon landing missions took place from 1969 to 1972.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Amina Khan
NASA's LADEE mission ended with a bang when the spacecraft crashed into the lunar surface Thursday. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer smashed into the dark side of the moon between 9:30 and 10:22 p.m., according to NASA officials. The vending-machine-sized spacecraft ran out of fuel and collided with the moon at a speed of roughly 3,600 miles per hour -- or “about three times the speed of a high-powered rifle bullet,” Rick Elphic, LADEE project scientist at NASA Ames Research Center said in a statement.
SCIENCE
October 17, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
NASA's recent lunar-punch mission apparently was not the high-profile flop it first appeared. Officials at Ames Research Center in Northern California, which managed the mission, released images Friday that clearly show a plume of debris emanating from the Cabeus crater shortly after the space agency's rocket plowed into it. The plume was estimated to reach about a mile from the lunar surface. Creating a plume was key to the mission's success because the goal was to measure dust kicked up by the Centaur rocket to find out whether ice might lie hidden in polar craters that haven't seen sunlight in billions of years.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A team of prominent Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are shooting for the moon with a new private venture aimed at scouring the lunar surface for precious metals and rare metallic elements. The private company Moon Express Inc., or MoonEx, is building robotic rovers alongside scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center northwest of San Jose. MoonEx's machines are designed to look for materials that are scarce on Earth but found in everything from a Toyota Prius car battery to guidance systems on cruise missiles.
SCIENCE
April 30, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A Soviet Union lunar rover discovered last month on the moon's surface might still prove useful nearly four decades after scientists lost track of it, with physicists announcing Monday that the rover's reflector can still shine bright. "It's been silent for almost 40 years, and nobody knew if it was even viable anymore," said Tom Murphy, a physicist at UC San Diego. Murphy led the team that identified the location of the reflector. Soviet scientists lost contact with the Lunokhod 1 rover on Sept.
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