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NEWS
June 16, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
Respiratory disease rates have risen to disproportionately high levels among minority groups in the United States at a time when the tobacco industry is intensifying its efforts to woo minority smokers, health officials said Wednesday. Public and private health officials at a national meeting in Los Angeles said there is a growing gap between whites and minority groups in their rates of lung cancer, tuberculosis, asthma, pneumonia and other conditions that affect the lungs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Babies who are at increased risk for developing respiratory problems later in life appear to have reduced lung function very early in life, researchers have found. Dr. Lynn M. Taussig and her colleagues at the Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson tested 124 babies and found those who had poorer lung function as newborns were much more likely to develop lower respiratory tract illness during their first year of life.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Twelve people who were exposed to the metal beryllium while working at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant have contracted a deadly lung disease, an Energy Department study obtained by a newspaper says. Eight current Rocky Flats workers and four retired employees tested positive for berylliosis, the Denver Post reported in Sunday editions.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial lung surgeries that draw hundreds of desperate emphysema sufferers each year to Orange County specialists no longer will be covered by Medicare, until the federal government is satisfied the procedures are safe and effective. The announcement has forced at least two hospitals in the county with growing surgical programs for emphysema patients to notify scores of seriously ill people across the country that their scheduled operations must be put off indefinitely.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists here have developed an artificial lung substance that in animal tests prevented respiratory distress syndrome--a significant killer of adults and premature babies, according to a study published today in a scientific journal. Researchers have labored for years to develop a synthetic form of the substance, called surfactant. Each year about 39,000 premature babies are born without surfactant and develop respiratory distress syndrome, an inability to keep air sacs open in the lungs.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | Reuters
A new study proves for the first time that smokers who quit wind up with healthier lungs, no matter how long they have smoked, researchers said Tuesday. The study involved more than 5,800 smokers who were victims of chronic obstructive lung disease, a combination of emphysema and bronchitis that is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. "This is the first time we've seen proof that if you stop smoking at any age, you will have healthier lungs," said Dr.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Doctors at Penn State University's Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., say they are ready to implant the world's first artificial lung into a human recipient. They said a membrane lung similar to those in heart-lung machines is ready to be tested, and the search for a patient has begun. The new device will be the first ever to be directly inserted in the body.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Robert Kovan, a psychiatrist, was forced into retirement in 1994 because he could no longer talk to his patients. His lungs, scarred by a lifetime smoking habit of two packs a day, would not provide him enough breath to speak in complete sentences. Kovan became permanently linked to an oxygen tank, his outside excursions limited to brief trips on an electric cart. "I was drained all the time from struggling to breathe," Kovan said. "It's like suffocating.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
At least one man who ate several bags of butter-flavored microwave popcorn each day has developed a life-threatening lung disease possibly caused by an additive in the popcorn, his doctor says, and U.S. regulators have launched an investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Before being born in August at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, the fetus had a bowel movement in the womb that got into her lungs, producing chemical pneumonia. After delivery, physicians at Harbor-UCLA were unable to get enough oxygen into the infant's blood and transferred her to Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, which has state-of-the-art technology for the management of lung disease. None of the new technology worked, however, and Dr.
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