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NEWS
January 6, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial lung surgeries that draw hundreds of desperate emphysema sufferers each year to Orange County specialists no longer will be covered by Medicare, until the federal government is satisfied the procedures are safe and effective. The announcement has forced at least two hospitals in the county with growing surgical programs for emphysema patients to notify scores of seriously ill people across the country that their scheduled operations must be put off indefinitely.
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HEALTH
May 26, 2012 | By James Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Full disclosure alert! I practically worshiped Jack LaLanne, who invented the modern fitness industry. He died last year at the age of 96. So, imagine how excited I was to get to speak with the woman who helped make Jack even more Jack. His widow, Elaine LaLanne, played a big role in Jack's fitness empire, and it was truly a delight to speak with this vibrant and entertaining woman. How did you and Jack start off together? He was a junk food junkie as a kid, and when we met so was I. We formed a relationship because of his show.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists here have developed an artificial lung substance that in animal tests prevented respiratory distress syndrome--a significant killer of adults and premature babies, according to a study published today in a scientific journal. Researchers have labored for years to develop a synthetic form of the substance, called surfactant. Each year about 39,000 premature babies are born without surfactant and develop respiratory distress syndrome, an inability to keep air sacs open in the lungs.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Doctors at Penn State University's Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., say they are ready to implant the world's first artificial lung into a human recipient. They said a membrane lung similar to those in heart-lung machines is ready to be tested, and the search for a patient has begun. The new device will be the first ever to be directly inserted in the body.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Robert Kovan, a psychiatrist, was forced into retirement in 1994 because he could no longer talk to his patients. His lungs, scarred by a lifetime smoking habit of two packs a day, would not provide him enough breath to speak in complete sentences. Kovan became permanently linked to an oxygen tank, his outside excursions limited to brief trips on an electric cart. "I was drained all the time from struggling to breathe," Kovan said. "It's like suffocating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Before being born in August at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, the fetus had a bowel movement in the womb that got into her lungs, producing chemical pneumonia. After delivery, physicians at Harbor-UCLA were unable to get enough oxygen into the infant's blood and transferred her to Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, which has state-of-the-art technology for the management of lung disease. None of the new technology worked, however, and Dr.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A teen-age girl died this morning 4 1/2 days after becoming the world's first recipient of an implanted device that works like a lung. LDS Hospital spokesman Tim Madden said Melicia Harvey, 16, of Arthur City, Tex., died of pulmonary failure at 5:30 a.m. The experimental IntraVascular Oxygenator--a 20-inch bundle of hollow synthetic fibers that delivers oxygen to the blood--functioned as intended until the girl's death, Madden said.
NEWS
July 13, 1986 | FRED BAYLES, Associated Press
In 1906, an English physician published one of the first reports of death by asbestos, writing of "spicules of asbestos" in the lungs of a 33-year-old factory worker who died of pulmonary fibrosis. Despite such early links to respiratory disease, the use of asbestos grew with the century. An easily mined mineral, it could be woven like cotton into a fabric that resisted flames and acids. Easily fabricated, it was tough enough to brake speeding locomotives.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | From Associated Press
A teen-age girl was in critical condition Saturday after becoming the world's first recipient of an implant consisting of a slender bundle of fibers that works like a lung in supplying oxygen to the body. The 20-inch device--designed to give damaged lungs a chance to rest and recover before it is removed--was implanted in a two-hour operation Friday at LDS Hospital, one of four U.S. centers approved for testing of the IntraVascular Oxygenator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2007 | William Heisel, Times Staff Writer
She saw whales while jogging on the beach. She swam with sea turtles in the Pacific. She snapped a couple of pictures of her friend while biking through the Hawaiian countryside. Monique Mendoza finished a triathlon Sunday, two years after having a double lung transplant. But that's not what she wanted to talk about. Mendoza wanted to talk about how the sun felt on her skin, what it was like to walk on lava rock, the way the doves cooed as she ran past. "Have you ever seen a dove up close?
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