Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLupita Tovar
IN THE NEWS

Lupita Tovar

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is in a celebratory mode this week, paying tribute to the movies of a century ago as well as honoring famed Mexican actress Lupita Tovar. "A Century Ago: The Films of 1906," set for Wednesday at the Linwood Dunn Theater, is the fourth in a series that looks at the developments in cinema 100 years ago through a program of films. As it turns out, 1906 was the year of the nickelodeon, says programmer Randy Haberkamp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is in a celebratory mode this week, paying tribute to the movies of a century ago as well as honoring famed Mexican actress Lupita Tovar. "A Century Ago: The Films of 1906," set for Wednesday at the Linwood Dunn Theater, is the fourth in a series that looks at the developments in cinema 100 years ago through a program of films. As it turns out, 1906 was the year of the nickelodeon, says programmer Randy Haberkamp.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Santa," the classic 1931 film that launched the era of sound in the Mexican film industry, will screen Wednesday in downtown Los Angeles with a special guest appearance by its leading actress, 91-year-old Lupita Tovar. The rare showing of the Spanish-language film (with English subtitles) will take place at the Palace Theatre on Broadway, one of downtown's ornate old movie houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Santa," the classic 1931 film that launched the era of sound in the Mexican film industry, will screen Wednesday in downtown Los Angeles with a special guest appearance by its leading actress, 91-year-old Lupita Tovar. The rare showing of the Spanish-language film (with English subtitles) will take place at the Palace Theatre on Broadway, one of downtown's ornate old movie houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1993
Cinecon, the society for fans of silents and early talkies, will hold its 29th annual convention Sept. 2-6 at the Hollywood Roosevelt. About 3,026 rare movies will be shown, and appearing with their films will be Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Patricia Morison, Anita Page, Marian Marsh, Marsha Hunt, Harry Carey Jr., Frank Coghlan Jr., Anna Lee, Norman Lloyd, composer David Raksin and Lupita Tovar. There will be two dealer rooms, panel discussions and an awards banquet. Information: (818) 883-8464.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1997
"Hollywood's Gentleman Agent," an exhibition celebrating the extraordinary career of the late Paul Kohner, is running at the Goethe Institute and run through May 31. Kohner, the son of a Czechoslovakian theater owner, arrived in New York in 1920 at 18 and began as an office boy for Carl Laemmle at the New York branch of Universal Studios. He later moved to Hollywood, where he become a producer and married Mexican movie star Lupita Tovar.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2012
Jeanne Crain The star was best known for her girl-next-door roles in "State Fair" and "Margie" when she was cast as an African American woman from the South who passed for white while studying in the North in 1949's "Pinky. " Mel Ferrer The actor made his film debut in the 1949 drama "Lost Boundaries" playing a physician who decides to pass for white after he is denied jobs when he applies as a black man. Susan Kohner Kohner, the daughter of Mexican actress Lupita Tovar and Austrian-Hungarian agent Paul Kohner, played a light-skinned daughter of a maid in the 1959 melodrama "Imitation of Life.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | Susan King
Mexican cinema has been flourishing for the last decade thanks to the international success of such innovative directors as Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuaron and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and actors Salma Hayek and Gael Garcia Bernal. Hollywood has also taken notice, with major studios luring the talent. But the cinematic cross-pollination is nothing new. In the silent era, Hollywood invited Mexican movie stars Dolores Del Rio, Lupe Velez, Ramon Navarro and Lupita Tovar to the major studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2009 | Susan King
From the time Adolf Hitler became Germany's chancellor in 1933 to the opening salvos of World War II in 1939, about 800 actors, directors, writers, composers and producers fled Europe for the safety of America. The Third Reich's loss was Hollywood's gain as the infusion of artistic talent changed moviemaking for decades to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Premier Fiesta Mexicana is the kind of working-class bar that most Southern Californians drive past without even seeing. The Bell Gardens restaurant and nightclub offers a dinner show with mariachi music and is packed most weekends, but on a summer night nearly a year ago, Carlos Galindo wasn't there looking for a good time. He was looking for a truck — and a way out of a desperate situation. Carlos, the lead character in director Chris Weitz's "A Better Life" — a new movie about the personal struggles of a Mexican gardener in the United States illegally — had scraped together every last dollar to buy a used pickup.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | ELENA KELLNER
Vikki Carr's new Sony LP, "Cosas del Amor," includes the No. 1 single by the same name, a duet with Mexico's Ana Gabriel. Penned and produced by Argentina's Roberto Livi, the poignant lyrics have Carr (who was born in El Paso, and whose full name is Florencia Vicenta de Casillas Martinez Cardona) advising Gabriel on "matters of love." Carr admits the song is personally meaningful.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
By the time she was 23, Susan Kohner had won two Golden Globes and received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actress for her scene-stealing performance in the classic 1959 melodrama "Imitation of Life." But just five years later, she gave up her movie career and never looked back. "I didn't have the passion anymore," says Kohner, 67. "The passion went into another direction and I never missed it. I think part of it was the man I married [the late John Weitz].
Los Angeles Times Articles
|