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NEWS
September 10, 2011
Angi Brzycki visited Japan's Yakushima Island this past spring after learning about its numerous scenic trails. Rain dampened most of her stay, but the sky was clear on the day she and a friend decided to take a 10-mile hike. As they ventured through a forest of ancient cedars, the Urasoe, Japan resident was enchanted by the lushness of the vegetation. "There were layers upon layers of life on every tree branch," she Bryzscki. Brzycki used a Leica D-Lux 4. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
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NEWS
September 10, 2011
Angi Brzycki visited Japan's Yakushima Island this past spring after learning about its numerous scenic trails. Rain dampened most of her stay, but the sky was clear on the day she and a friend decided to take a 10-mile hike. As they ventured through a forest of ancient cedars, the Urasoe, Japan resident was enchanted by the lushness of the vegetation. "There were layers upon layers of life on every tree branch," she Bryzscki. Brzycki used a Leica D-Lux 4. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1996
I recently saw the movie "Tin Cup." The movie tells an entertaining "boy gets girl" story about two young men who met in college who pursued their careers as professional golfers. There is more to the story, which is really well told. But what I am deeply disturbed about is the way the film subliminally pushed the heavy and continuous use of alcoholic beverages. This movie carries the subliminal message that winning or losing is not all that important; what is really all right is to have a few drinks with friends and acquaintances, that the consumption of alcoholic beverages creates the environment where friends can relax and enjoy one another's company, regardless of what else is going on (or not going on)
BOOKS
May 25, 2008
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. -- *--* -- Fiction weeks on list 1. The Host by Stephenie Meyer (Little, Brown: 1 $25.99) A woman refuses to give in to alien invaders who take over the minds, but not the bodies, of humans. 2. Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri (Knopf: $25) 7 Stories of U.S.-born children and their Bengali parents straddling cultures. 3. Careless in Red by Elizabeth George (Harper: 1 $27.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the characters populating the new Showtime movie "Lush Life," jazz is more than just a popular form of music. It's a way of life, bordering on religion. Set in New York, "Lush Life" focuses on the relationship between two jazz musicians, saxophonist Al Gorky (Jeff Goldblum) and trumpeter Buddy Chester (Forest Whitaker). Though not superstars, they're well-respected sidemen, playing everywhere and everything from bar mitzvahs and weddings to commercials, Broadway and be-bop.
BOOKS
July 14, 1996 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
To jazz fans, Billy Strayhorn is a much-admired but enigmatic figure whose name is inevitably linked with that of Duke Ellington. To the wider musical public, he is a virtual unknown. Yet it was Strayhorn, not Ellington, as is generally believed, who wrote the Ellington Orchestra's classic theme song, "Take the 'A' Train."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1996 | Lorraine Ali, Lorraine Ali writes about pop music for Calendar
For most of its seven-year career, Lush has been as intriguingly distant as Pluto, with a core of dedicated fans orbiting like curious probes. One of England's enigmatic "dream pop" bands, the quartet buried its tunes and wafting vocals under layers of guitar reverb, signed with the esoteric 4AD record label and put out cryptically titled records such as "Spooky" and "Scar." It didn't help, from an accessibility standpoint, that the musicians looked so cool as to be unapproachable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Movies about jazz through the years (whether theatrical or made-for-TV) have maintained a low level of authenticity. It is a rare pleasure to report that "Lush Life" is an exception to the rule. The story line might well be dismissed as just another disease-of-the-week melodrama. But the relationship between the two principal characters is warmly convincing, thanks to the writing (by director Michael Elias) and the performances. Jeff Goldblum is a saxophonist, Forest Whitaker a trumpeter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Fox bats .500 tonight with its new comedies "Party Girl" and "Lush Life." The high achiever is "Party Girl," a funny gala of fresh, cleverly bent whimsy and endearing lightness that brings out the burlesque best in Christine Taylor, allowing her to far exceed her campy neo-Marcia in two movie revivals of "The Brady Bunch."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
"Jazz Alive," airing tonight on the Bravo cable channel at 7 and midnight, was taped in 1983 in Toronto, with an assortment of Canadian and American musicians. Maynard Ferguson, who opens the show with two numbers backed by the Canadian house band self-consciously reading its parts, plays high, wide and not very handsome. A bravura expert, he has rarely shown much class as an improvising musician and seems even less inspired nowadays. Also past his prime was the great Teddy Wilson, a seminal pianist of the 1930s, seen here three years before his death, going rather sadly through the motions of what was once an excitingly fresh style.
BOOKS
March 2, 2008 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
IN the early 1990s, Richard Price made a decision to change direction in his work. Until then, he'd been an atmospheric urban novelist, the author of, among other titles, "The Wanderers," a Bronx-based coming-of-age novel set in the early 1960s, and "Ladies' Man," about a week in the life of a door-to-door salesman who's looking for love. These are self-contained books, small and character-driven, reminiscent in places of the gritty realism of Hubert Selby Jr.'s "Last Exit to Brooklyn."
MAGAZINE
March 28, 2004 | Susan Heeger
If Randee St. Nicholas had her way, you'd have to hack a path from her garden gate to her front door with a machete. Vines, hedges and weeping trees lend a forgotten feeling to the garden of her Hollywood Hills home. Inside, exotic rugs, lamps, mirrors, antique tables and chairs create an otherworldly range of colors and textures. St. Nicholas, a photographer and director of music videos, commercials and films, chose the Mediterranean-style house for its 1920s pedigree and its three-quarter-acre garden, overgrown even when she bought it a decade ago. Once settled, she began filling the home's interior and exterior with furnishings, statues and beds collected on worldwide photography trips.
BOOKS
April 27, 2008
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* -- Fiction weeks on list 1. Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri (Knopf: $25) 3 Stories of American-born children and their Bengali parents straddling cultures. 2. Hollywood Crows by Joseph Wambaugh (Little, 3 Brown: $26.99) Two cops become ensnared in a femme fatale's nasty divorce. 3.
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