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Luxuries

BUSINESS
May 29, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The war of nerves going on between Southern California and its National Football League teams has all the spectacle and outrage of millionaires looking for welfare. Al Davis, managing partner of the Los Angeles Raiders, threatened again last week to move the team out of town unless the city handed him hugely profitable luxury boxes at the Coliseum plus other concessions, including free rent.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 1996 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It felt like the '80s again when Rodeo Drive store owner Fred Hayman sold the two $5,000 leather coats by designer Karl Lagerfeld. "We would not have been able to make that kind of sale three years ago," said Hayman, who has seen Rodeo's fat times and lean in his 30 years as owner of Fred Hayman Beverly Hills. As recently as 1993, Rodeo landlords were cinching their Gucci belts and giving retail tenants extra time to pay their bills.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you thought the $50,000 luxury SUV was the pinnacle of vehicular excess, just wait for the luxury pickup truck. Despite soaring gasoline prices and a weakening national economy, Lincoln and Cadillac both are preparing to launch ultra-luxury versions of the pickup, an American blue-collar icon. Ford Motor Co.'s Lincoln will lead the way with the Blackwood, due in dealerships late this summer. General Motors Corp.'s Cadillac plays catch-up in the first quarter of 2002 with the Escalade EXT.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sharon Green still hopes that she won't be able to sell Tally, the 6-year-old mare that was her "dream come true," an animal she not only rides but kisses and cuddles. Maybe no one will offer a reasonable price. Or the only potential buyer will look like a horse-beater. "I couldn't possibly sell to anyone who'd mistreat her," Green said. "We'd have to keep her."
BUSINESS
May 23, 1995 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two days after the Clinton Administration's 100% import tariff on most Japanese-made luxury cars provisionally took effect, the five Japanese import companies affected were split on the tactics for handling the looming crisis. And while both sides in the trade talks so far have been intransigent, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Ronald H. Brown said Monday that Washington would abide by any ruling of the World Trade Organization over the sanctions it has imposed.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2008 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
The purse may be the consummate accessory in New York, but in Los Angeles, where Hollywood deals are sealed while navigating traffic on the Santa Monica Freeway, the cellphone is the ultimate status symbol. Here are some that really get the cash register ringing. $28,000 to $171,550 GoldVish Illusion. For the jewelry lover who has everything, this diamond-encrusted phone comes in a solid 18-karat casing in yellow, rose or white gold with crocodile leather inlays available in 12 colors.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1996
Donald Callender's business jet is fit for a king, and it needs to be. Passengers who have chartered it include foreign dignitaries on vacation trips around the U.S.; a half-dozen former heads of the Department of Defense being ferried to a GOP strategy meeting in Texas several years ago; and an assortment of Hollywood types including Danny DeVito and Sylvester Stallone.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | Steve Emmons and Shearlean Duke
. . . AND BUST: First the luxury tax, then the recession have dealt heavy blows to local boat sales. The result: The most expensive new boat in local inventory reportedly is a mere $800,000. . . . Newport Beach dealer Gordon Barienbrock says his inventory has slipped from $6 million last year to about $2 million now. . . . The pinched market has him talking like a car dealer: "It's probably the best time to buy. The prices are cheap, the deals are better. We have to move our inventory."
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Any marketer who honestly believes that conspicuous consumption is out--and restraint is in--didn't make it to Beverly Hills over the weekend. There was ostentatiousness at its grandest. Three blocks of Rodeo Drive were closed so that Ferrari--the Italian maker of $100,000-plus sports cars--could display its 24-karat sheet metal to some of the wealthiest gawkers in L.A. Ferrari said it came to town to introduce its new $120,000 Spider convertible and, incidentally, to raise money for charity.
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