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BUSINESS
December 8, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
December was the stressed-out season at Luz. From executives to laborers, employees put their backs into the work, ignoring the holidays and racking up overtime as Westwood-based Luz International Inc.--developer of plants that generate 90% of the world's solar power--raced a deadline set by short-term federal tax credits to finish another quarter-million-dollar electricity plant by New Year's Day.
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NEWS
January 11, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of explosions and fire shut down electricity generation at the world's largest solar power plant near here Wednesday. Thick plumes of black smoke spiraled into the clear desert air when one of four natural gas-fired heaters used to back up the solar heating system exploded. A short time later, a second natural gas heater caught fire and exploded as the first of 75 firefighters and 25 pieces of equipment were arriving at the site, about 140 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1991
I have read Castaneda's article and agree. As a Cuban-American, I second the motion that Fidel Castro may have to step aside if the achievements of the revolution are not to be lost in the search for economic survival. Like Gorbachev, Castro at times resembles a Moses figure, a prophet who leads his people to the River Jordan but never reaches the Promised Land. CLARENCE BAUTISTA SANTOS Los Angeles
BUSINESS
July 6, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming the recession and low oil prices, solar power company Luz International Ltd. said Friday that it laid off 350 workers--about half of its permanent work force--and postponed for a year the construction of its 10th solar plant in the Mojave Desert. In addition to the layoffs Thursday, which affected workers in Jerusalem and California, Luz on Tuesday also let go about 300 temporary construction workers hired last month to begin building the proposed solar power plant.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A battery that could be quickly refueled, like a car's gas tank, has joined the race to develop the first practical electric car. Westwood-based Luz International Ltd., which produces 95% of the world's solar electricity, said Thursday that the concept could help replace the polluting internal-combustion engine. Luz said it plans to demonstrate its battery--which uses a silvery liquid slurry to produce an electric charge--with a test run from Sacramento to Los Angeles early in 1992.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using a technology that stores energy in molten salt, Southern California Edison and two other California utilities will announce plans today to build the world's most advanced solar power plant in the Mojave Desert near Barstow. If it proves commercially practical, Solar Two--to be constructed at the site of an earlier Edison solar plant that just missed being profitable--would be the model for larger plants capable of providing enough energy to light 100,000 to 200,000 homes.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Falling oil prices have cast a pall on large-scale solar energy production projects nearly everywhere but here in the Mojave Desert, where a Los Angeles firm just doubled its power output to 196 megawatts. The Luz International Ltd. system, which began in 1983 with a 14-megawatt solar energy generating plant in the nearby community of Dagget, now has seven "solar farms" that use 650,000 parabolic mirrors to convert sunlight into enough electricity to power more than 100,000 homes.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
December was the stressed-out season at Luz. From executives to laborers, employees put their backs into the work, ignoring the holidays and racking up overtime as Westwood-based Luz International Inc.--developer of plants that generate 90% of the world's solar power--raced a deadline set by short-term federal tax credits to finish another quarter-million-dollar electricity plant by New Year's Day.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1991
I have read Castaneda's article and agree. As a Cuban-American, I second the motion that Fidel Castro may have to step aside if the achievements of the revolution are not to be lost in the search for economic survival. Like Gorbachev, Castro at times resembles a Moses figure, a prophet who leads his people to the River Jordan but never reaches the Promised Land. CLARENCE BAUTISTA SANTOS Los Angeles
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using a technology that stores energy in molten salt, Southern California Edison and two other California utilities will announce plans today to build the world's most advanced solar power plant in the Mojave Desert near Barstow. If it proves commercially practical, Solar Two--to be constructed at the site of an earlier Edison solar plant that just missed being profitable--would be the model for larger plants capable of providing enough energy to light 100,000 to 200,000 homes.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a last-ditch effort to save the company from bankruptcy, foundering Luz International--the world's largest solar energy producer--has launched an unannounced restructuring that includes the departure of its founders and a deal with a giant Swiss industrial concern.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming the recession and low oil prices, solar power company Luz International Ltd. said Friday that it laid off 350 workers--about half of its permanent work force--and postponed for a year the construction of its 10th solar plant in the Mojave Desert. In addition to the layoffs Thursday, which affected workers in Jerusalem and California, Luz on Tuesday also let go about 300 temporary construction workers hired last month to begin building the proposed solar power plant.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A battery that could be quickly refueled, like a car's gas tank, has joined the race to develop the first practical electric car. Westwood-based Luz International Ltd., which produces 95% of the world's solar electricity, said Thursday that the concept could help replace the polluting internal-combustion engine. Luz said it plans to demonstrate its battery--which uses a silvery liquid slurry to produce an electric charge--with a test run from Sacramento to Los Angeles early in 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A controversial bill to grant a $6.4-million property tax break to Luz International, a company planning to build four large-scale solar energy plants in the Mojave Desert in San Bernardino County, was sent back to the Legislature by Gov. Pete Wilson for reworking. A Wilson spokesman said the governor "had some concerns" with the legislation as written and requested the author to take it back for "possible amendments and changes. Sen. Becky Morgan (R-Los Altos Hills) agreed to withdraw the bill.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of explosions and fire shut down electricity generation at the world's largest solar power plant near here Wednesday. Thick plumes of black smoke spiraled into the clear desert air when one of four natural gas-fired heaters used to back up the solar heating system exploded. A short time later, a second natural gas heater caught fire and exploded as the first of 75 firefighters and 25 pieces of equipment were arriving at the site, about 140 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A controversial bill to grant a $6.4-million property tax break to Luz International, a company planning to build four large-scale solar energy plants in the Mojave Desert in San Bernardino County, was sent back to the Legislature by Gov. Pete Wilson for reworking. A Wilson spokesman said the governor "had some concerns" with the legislation as written and requested the author to take it back for "possible amendments and changes. Sen. Becky Morgan (R-Los Altos Hills) agreed to withdraw the bill.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a last-ditch effort to save the company from bankruptcy, foundering Luz International--the world's largest solar energy producer--has launched an unannounced restructuring that includes the departure of its founders and a deal with a giant Swiss industrial concern.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Falling oil prices have cast a pall on large-scale solar energy production projects nearly everywhere but here in the Mojave Desert, where a Los Angeles firm just doubled its power output to 196 megawatts. The Luz International Ltd. system, which began in 1983 with a 14-megawatt solar energy generating plant in the nearby community of Dagget, now has seven "solar farms" that use 650,000 parabolic mirrors to convert sunlight into enough electricity to power more than 100,000 homes.
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