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Ly Tong

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December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
A self-described freedom fighter whose cult-hero status grew among Vietnamese after staging a 28-day hunger strike in San Jose has found a new cause -- protesting a Little Saigon newspaper accused of communist leanings. But this time Ly Tong is eating. Tong, a former South Vietnamese Air Force pilot, joined forces Sunday afternoon with protesters who have demonstrated in front of Nguoi Viet Daily News since late January.
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NEWS
December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
NEWS
November 30, 1992 | DE TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest chapter in the extraordinary life of Ly Tong began in September when the former South Vietnam air force fighter pilot and one-time Orange County resident hijacked a commercial plane over Ho Chi Minh City and tossed out 50,000 leaflets calling for the overthrow of the Communist regime. The naturalized U.S. citizen then parachuted to the ground and was promptly arrested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
A self-described freedom fighter whose cult-hero status grew among Vietnamese after staging a 28-day hunger strike in San Jose has found a new cause -- protesting a Little Saigon newspaper accused of communist leanings. But this time Ly Tong is eating. Tong, a former South Vietnamese Air Force pilot, joined forces Sunday afternoon with protesters who have demonstrated in front of Nguoi Viet Daily News since late January.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | From Reuters
A light plane piloted by an American buzzed Havana early Saturday, dropping scores of anti-communist leaflets that called President Fidel Castro an "old dinosaur" and urged Cubans to revolt against his "tyrannical regime," witnesses and U.S. authorities said. The U.S. Customs Service said the single-engine Cessna 172 was flown from South Florida by Ly Tong, a Vietnamese-born, 51-year-old "strident anti-communist" who had no apparent ties to Castro's exiled foes in Miami.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little Saigon community members Wednesday rallied around the recent release of five Vietnamese political dissidents, including a former Orange County resident and another who was imprisoned in Vietnam for publishing a pro-democracy newsletter. "This is a major event for the Vietnamese and Vietnamese American people," said Cong Minh Tran of Tustin and co-founder of the Human Rights Coalition Network, which focuses on human rights issues in Vietnam.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam's most prominent political dissident was headed to the United States on Tuesday after being released under a government amnesty program announced last week, while a human rights group reported the release of a prominent Buddhist monk and scholar. Writer and journalist Doan Viet Hoat boarded a plane for Bangkok, Thailand, and hoped to reunite with family members in Minnesota this week. Thich Tri Sieu, of the outlawed Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam, was reportedly also freed Tuesday.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
NEWS
November 30, 1992 | DE TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest chapter in the extraordinary life of Ly Tong began in September when the former South Vietnam air force fighter pilot and one-time Orange County resident hijacked a commercial plane over Ho Chi Minh City and tossed out 50,000 leaflets calling for the overthrow of the Communist regime. The naturalized U.S. citizen then parachuted to the ground and was promptly arrested.
BOOKS
August 30, 1992 | David Huddle, David Huddle served in Vietnam as an enlisted man in the U.S. Army in the 1960s. His most recent books are "The Nature Of Yearning" (poetry) and "The Writing Habit" (essays)
What we Americans think we know about the Vietnam War has been delivered to us almost entirely by journalists: the network TV correspondents who zapped those panicky wobbling-camera shots of combat into our living rooms each evening after dinner; the newspaper photographers who engraved in our minds images of a naked, running, napalm-burned child; and the books of such magazine and newspaper writers as Michael Herr, Bernard Fall, and David Halberstam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2007 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
When federal agents took an elderly Hmong man who relies on heart medication and a cane into custody this week, Vang Pao became the latest anti-Communist leader in Southern California's suburbs to be accused of trying to rekindle a long-ago war.
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