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Lycopene

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HEALTH
November 10, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Ever since scientists announced that tomatoes could boost defenses against cancer, particularly of the prostate, people have been diligently throwing tomatoes in salads or digging into dishes made with tomato sauce or tomato paste. A few cut corners by downing nutritional supplements containing the supposed magical ingredient, lycopene, which also provides the fruit's red color. Now it seems the tomato eaters were on the right track.
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NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
The life of a scientist isn't all boring lab work and dry statistics. Sometimes those folks have fun. Take Neil Da Costa, an expert in chemical analysis of flavors at International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. in New Jersey. Da Costa made a presentation Tuesday on what it takes to create the perfect Bloody Mary at the 241st National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim. "We thought this was an interesting subject that would appeal to the popular masses," said Da Costa, speaking from the conference, "and that it would get people thinking about the chemistry of food.
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HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange, Special to The Times
Tomatoes and lycopene have become closely connected, since about 80% of the cancer-fighting lycopene Americans consume is in processed tomato products, including sauces and ketchup. The antioxidant lycopene gives foods such as tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava and rose hips their red color. Tomatoes get most of the attention, however, because the other foods haven't been studied as thoroughly. But watermelon soon may be getting more notice.
HEALTH
November 10, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Ever since scientists announced that tomatoes could boost defenses against cancer, particularly of the prostate, people have been diligently throwing tomatoes in salads or digging into dishes made with tomato sauce or tomato paste. A few cut corners by downing nutritional supplements containing the supposed magical ingredient, lycopene, which also provides the fruit's red color. Now it seems the tomato eaters were on the right track.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
The life of a scientist isn't all boring lab work and dry statistics. Sometimes those folks have fun. Take Neil Da Costa, an expert in chemical analysis of flavors at International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. in New Jersey. Da Costa made a presentation Tuesday on what it takes to create the perfect Bloody Mary at the 241st National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim. "We thought this was an interesting subject that would appeal to the popular masses," said Da Costa, speaking from the conference, "and that it would get people thinking about the chemistry of food.
HEALTH
April 6, 2009 | Chris Woolston
It's a good thing dietary guidelines aren't laws. If they were, just about all of us could be found guilty. Even if you load fruit onto your whole-grain cereal and pile greens on your sandwiches, chances are you're regularly falling short on one or more nutrients. Many people take multivitamins to fill in these gaps, but since everyone's different, how do you pick the right pill? You can't buy a multivitamin with your name on it, but you can buy one aimed at your gender.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
A study has found the first direct evidence that the nutrient that makes tomatoes red may protect men against prostate cancer by shrinking tumors and slowing their spread. The nutrient, lycopene, has emerged as one of the trendiest of all nutritional supplements in recent years. Large population surveys have suggested that those who eat plenty of tomatoes--the primary natural source of lycopene--are less likely to get prostate cancer and some other malignancies.
HEALTH
November 14, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Producers of tomatoes, tomato sauce and dietary supplements containing lycopene -- the substance that makes tomatoes red -- will not be allowed to advertise claims that they reduce the risk of many forms of cancer, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. But companies will be able to suggest a limited link between tomatoes and a lowered risk of prostate cancer, the agency said.
HEALTH
July 23, 2007 | Chelsea Martinez, Times Staff Writer
This just in: Organic tomatoes have more lycopene than conventionally farmed tomatoes. This also just in: Lycopene may not be as healthful as we thought. So goes the bold field of tomato research. As the most frequently consumed produce in America after potatoes, tomatoes provide vitamins, minerals and fiber -- and, of course, they're nonfat. Plus, with high levels of the antioxidant lycopene, they've been considered a potentially powerful cancer fighter.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1998 | Reuters
The H.J. Heinz Co. said Wednesday that it is launching a new print advertising campaign touting the benefit of processed tomato products in reducing the risk of certain cancers and heart disease. The ads feature a pouring bottle of Heinz catsup and messages promoting the health benefit of lycopene, an antioxidant found in tomato products.
HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange, Special to The Times
Tomatoes and lycopene have become closely connected, since about 80% of the cancer-fighting lycopene Americans consume is in processed tomato products, including sauces and ketchup. The antioxidant lycopene gives foods such as tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava and rose hips their red color. Tomatoes get most of the attention, however, because the other foods haven't been studied as thoroughly. But watermelon soon may be getting more notice.
FOOD
January 4, 1990 | JEAN CARPER, Carper is a medical and nutrition writer and the author of 15 books, including "The Food Pharmacy."
Eat your tomatoes. The red globes are rich in a compound that Johns Hopkins University researchers have found lacking in people most apt to develop pancreatic cancer. The malignancy is especially virulent, killing 22,000 Americans yearly. The investigators examined blood samples collected 10 years ago from 26,000 people. The scientists were searching for clues that might identify those most likely to later develop cancer of the pancreas.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2010
The artist collective Fallen Fruit continues Eat LACMA, its yearlong project on food, art, culture and politics, with the Tomato Hootenanny. Pick up a tomato seedling plant (arrive early — they'll go fast), dance a jig with the old-time string band Triple Chicken Foot and participate in a Mortgage Lifter Tomato Workshop with artists Anne Hars and Stephanie Allespach. We're not sure what they mean by Mortgage Lifter but we're willing to believe this is yet another secret benefit of lycopene.
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