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Lydia Camarillo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Democratic National Committee has tapped Lydia Camarillo, leader of the Southwest Voter Registration Project in Texas, to head the party's 2000 national convention, which will be held in Los Angeles in August. Party leaders are expected to announce the appointment of Camarillo, who heads the nation's largest voter registration project, and introduce other members of the convention management team in Los Angeles today, sources said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2000 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like all big parties, the Democratic National Convention carries the possibility of confetti-flying glory or humiliating embarrassment for its hosts. No one knows better than Lydia Camarillo, the woman in charge of making sure this summer's convention is remembered in Los Angeles history as the biggest event since the 1984 Olympics--rather than, say, the 1992 riots.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1999 | TONY LYSTRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leticia Camarillo of Oxnard had drifted through her twenties trying to figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She was finally making some progress, said her sister, when a car wreck on Sunday cut short her life and that of her 7-year-old daughter, Veronica Falcon. "Before, she was like any young person: full of life, but not with any real sense of direction," said Lydia Camarillo, 41, of San Antonio. But last year, Leticia began a transformation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1999 | TONY LYSTRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leticia Camarillo of Oxnard had drifted through her twenties trying to figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She was finally making some progress, said her sister, when a car wreck on Sunday cut short her life and that of her 7-year-old daughter, Veronica Falcon. "Before, she was like any young person: full of life, but not with any real sense of direction," said Lydia Camarillo, 41, of San Antonio. But last year, Leticia began a transformation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2000 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like all big parties, the Democratic National Convention carries the possibility of confetti-flying glory or humiliating embarrassment for its hosts. No one knows better than Lydia Camarillo, the woman in charge of making sure this summer's convention is remembered in Los Angeles history as the biggest event since the 1984 Olympics--rather than, say, the 1992 riots.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local small-business owners are continuing their push to get a share of the estimated $132 million that the upcoming Democratic National Convention is expected to pump into the Los Angeles economy. Fifty members of the Latino business community met Monday with Lydia Camarillo, chief executive of the 2000 Democratic National Convention Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2000
The roughly 5,000 Democratic Party delegates and 15,000 members of the media expected to visit during the Democratic National Convention learned Tuesday where they will be staying, as convention planners released the names of 84 hotels being booked. In planning for the August 14-17 convention inside Staples Center Arena, nearly 18,000 rooms were reserved in hotels throughout Los Angeles County.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
COUNTING CHANGE: A nanny problem has cut down the Clinton Administration's top choice to head the Census Bureau, Leo Estrada. The new leading candidate, David Hayes-Bautista, has similar credentials: He is a noted Latino demographer at UCLA. . . . Estrada, an expert on immigration patterns, said he told background checkers that he had employed an illegal immigrant for child care and did not pay her Social Security taxes.
OPINION
December 5, 1999
The Times' recent coverage of the 2000 Democratic National Convention planning process compels me to respond and correct its inaccuracies. The substance of the charge is that the L.A. Convention planners are "six to 10 months behind where the organizers of the 1996 Chicago convention were at this point in their planning" (Dec. 1). The article not only fails to identify any specific facts to back up its claim, it also fails to articulate any timeline, methodology or criteria for the six- to 10-month figure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000
A delegation from the Democratic National Committee paid us a visit last week to assure The Times and, by proxy, the public that the committee is on top of all planning for the convention in Los Angeles in August. The kindest thing we can say is that we were not reassured. To be less kind and more accurate, we were alarmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Democratic National Committee has tapped Lydia Camarillo, leader of the Southwest Voter Registration Project in Texas, to head the party's 2000 national convention, which will be held in Los Angeles in August. Party leaders are expected to announce the appointment of Camarillo, who heads the nation's largest voter registration project, and introduce other members of the convention management team in Los Angeles today, sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999
There are lots of excuses and plenty of finger-pointing to explain the slow start and delays in planning the Democratic National Convention. But the fact is that 35,000 or so delegates, officials, reporters and others will descend on Los Angeles come August. That's more than eight months away but not a long time to prepare for such an enormous event. Completion of the items on the "to do" list for the Aug. 14-17 quadrennial creeps along like a SigAlert on the 405 Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janitors and contractors met into the evening Tuesday in an attempt to end the countywide strike, now in its third week, as two prominent U.S. senators joined the list of legislators publicly supporting the janitors. Tuesday's negotiations broke off in the afternoon, when contractors offered no new wage concessions and janitors walked out. But building owner Rob Maguire intervened, calling the janitors back.
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