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Lydia Woodward

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
It's hard to imagine that the grunt's-eye view of Vietnam presented by CBS' drama "Tour of Duty" and the introspective, tormented Vietnam of ABC's "China Beach" weren't drawn by men. After all, war is a man's story, an age-old, coming-of-age ritual for men. But behind the scenes of both series--living and working, as their characters do, in a predominantly male world--are a host of female players. They are producers, directors, writers, art directors and casting chiefs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
It's hard to imagine that the grunt's-eye view of Vietnam presented by CBS' drama "Tour of Duty" and the introspective, tormented Vietnam of ABC's "China Beach" weren't drawn by men. After all, war is a man's story, an age-old, coming-of-age ritual for men. But behind the scenes of both series--living and working, as their characters do, in a predominantly male world--are a host of female players. They are producers, directors, writers, art directors and casting chiefs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992
Writers from three "I'll Fly Away" episodes are in the running for cash awards in the 18th annual Humanitas Prizes, which reward the writers of TV programs judged to "most fully enrich the viewing audience." The first-year NBC drama captured two nominations in the category for 60-minute programs, which carries a $15,000 prize, and another in the category for programs 90 minutes or longer, which carries a $25,000 prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1992
Gone but not forgotten: the canceled "thirtysomething" and "China Beach" grabbed four of the six nominations for best writing in an episodic drama Monday as the Writers Guild of America unveiled the TV and radio finalists for its 44th annual awards. The awards, covering the period Sept. 1, 1990 to Aug. 31, 1991, will be announced during ceremonies March 22.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
James Cromwell has been studying Shakespeare's classic tragedy "King Lear" in hopes of doing a production of the play in the future. In the meantime, he's playing a variation of "King Lear" in his new CBS drama series, "Citizen Baines." Lear is a monarch with three grown daughters who hangs up his crown. Cromwell's Elliott Baines is a well-respected liberal senator with three daughters who, in a surprising upset, loses his bid for reelection for a fourth term.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | Susan King Times, Staff Writer
"There is a prevailing attitude in a lot of television that if you are over 24, your face shouldn't be on the airwaves," confesses Chris Thompson, creator and executive producer of two new comedies: CBS' "Ladies Man" and Fox's "Action." But Thompson is ignoring the "prevailing" attitude. "I've got the two oldest stars in Hollywood," he says referring to the fact he cast veteran sitcom star Betty White in CBS's "Ladies Man" and the legendary comic Buddy Hackett in Fox's "Action."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | Kate Aurthur
On the night of Feb. 10, 2000 -- in the pre-spoiler era, when it was possible to watch an episode of television and be wholly surprised -- "ER" viewers found themselves stunned/petrified by its final two minutes. The scene: During a Valentine's Day party in the ER, an annoyed Carter (Noah Wyle) goes looking for his put-upon medical student, Lucy (Kellie Martin), to reprimand her one more time for the day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like a natural for an evening out--two lovers going to a nightclub to hear some cool jazz. But the situation was anything but simple for Dr. Peter Benton, County General Memorial Hospital's intense, high-profile black surgeon played by Eriq La Salle and one of the central figures in "ER." The show's writers have woven Benton's struggle to adjust to his relationship with white surgeon Elizabeth Corday (Alex Kingston) through most of this season and last.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1998 | ROBERT STRAUSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you watch enough TV, so your mother always told you, your vision is likely to turn a bit blurry. But this network prime-time season, tube-aholics might be rubbing their eyes more than normal and thinking, "Didn't I see him somewhere before?" In unprecedented numbers, actors and actresses are doubling up this season. More and more are playing different recurring characters on network sitcoms and dramas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Why isn't ABC rerunning a "China Beach" episode about abortion this summer? "China Beach's" producers are under the impression that fear of again losing advertisers over the episode's abortion theme--which prompted a number of sponsors to withdraw when it aired Jan. 31--prompted ABC to reject it as a summer rerun. "Call it what you like, but it's censorship," charged producer Lydia Woodward, blaming advertisers even more than ABC.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For "ER's" Alex Kingston, the British actress with that authoritative clipped voice emblematic in her portrayal of Dr. Elizabeth Corday, it was one of her character's defining moments. Late last season in a plot threaded through several episodes, Corday opted off the surgical team for a less prestigious emergency room internship, after clashing with the irascible, lascivious surgical chief Dr. Romano (Paul McCrane).
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