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NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for signs that the cancer has spread. However, people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node may not need to have additional lymph nodes removed. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., researchers examined patients who had an early-stage tumor. All of the patients had their tumors removed with lumpectomy (when just part of the breast is removed, not the entire breast)
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SPORTS
February 24, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Mike Butcher was not overly concerned in mid-January when a routine visit to a doctor for a bone spur in his neck led to the discovery of a small growth and a trip to a specialist for a biopsy. "There was no doubt in my mind I didn't have anything wrong," the Angels' pitching coach said. "I thought maybe it was a cyst. " When test results showed he had papillary thyroid cancer, "My immediate reaction was 'Whoa,' you don't want to hear the C-word," said Butcher, 45. "I was shocked.
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HEALTH
February 18, 2011 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes less is more in breast cancer treatment; so says a study that made headlines earlier this month: The finding, published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., reported that surgically removing multiple cancer-containing lymph nodes under the arm in women with small tumors — instead of just one or two — may cause more harm than good. The finding seems to fly in the face of what most people believe — that cancers must be treated aggressively for the best odds of recovery and survival.
HEALTH
February 18, 2011 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes less is more in breast cancer treatment; so says a study that made headlines earlier this month: The finding, published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., reported that surgically removing multiple cancer-containing lymph nodes under the arm in women with small tumors — instead of just one or two — may cause more harm than good. The finding seems to fly in the face of what most people believe — that cancers must be treated aggressively for the best odds of recovery and survival.
HEALTH
February 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Some women with early-stage breast cancer may be cured without the need to remove multiple lymph nodes, which has been the standard practice, researchers reported Tuesday. Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for evidence that the cancer has spread. However, a new study found that people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node fared just as well after treatment without the removal of additional lymph nodes in the armpit area.
NEWS
October 13, 1998 | Associated Press
Campers and residents in the upper Sierra have been warned to keep their pets indoors after bubonic plague was found in a cat and two chipmunks. While no humans have been stricken, the Nevada County Department of Environmental Health has issued a "plague alert," listing precautions that should be taken. Bubonic plague, carried by infected fleas, can be transmitted to humans by rodents or pets that come in contact with them.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | DR. GLENN ERICSON, Ericson, a practicing Orange County veterinarian, is immediate past president of the Southern California Veterinary Medical Assn
Q Can you give me any information on "cat scratch fever"--how it's caused, treatment, indications, etc.? Mrs. L.P. Schulz, Westminster A. Cat scratch fever is a common name given to an infection that is introduced into a person by a penetrating wound, which results in severe local swelling of the affected area and enlargement of the local lymph nodes. It most commonly occurs after the scratch or bite of a cat or dog; hence the name. This accounts for about 70% of the cases, with the rest being caused by splinters or other foreign objects.
SPORTS
June 19, 1987 | JEFFREY PARENTI
Irene Volodkevich used to take triathlons so seriously that she left the Marine Corps to concentrate on training for an Ironman event. Volodkevich, 28, still enjoys participating in triathlons, but now the sport helps her in a far more serious struggle. She has malignant melanoma, a form of cancer that was detected in a mole and has since spread to her lymph nodes. This type of cancer usually starts in a mole, spreads into the bloodstream and settles in the lymph or organ system.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Molli Mullen begins her last chemotherapy treatment today. Just as sure as the Adriamycin drips into her bloodstream over the next 48 hours, she knows she will feel lousy exactly 10 days from now. She will be lightheaded, cranky and virtually unable to move. The fuzz she has for hair will fall out again and sores will develop inside her mouth. She has done this long enough to know the routine and the after-effects from the treatment that could save her life.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
HEALTH
February 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Some women with early-stage breast cancer may be cured without the need to remove multiple lymph nodes, which has been the standard practice, researchers reported Tuesday. Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for evidence that the cancer has spread. However, a new study found that people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node fared just as well after treatment without the removal of additional lymph nodes in the armpit area.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for signs that the cancer has spread. However, people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node may not need to have additional lymph nodes removed. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , researchers  examined patients who had an early-stage tumor. All of the patients had their tumors removed with lumpectomy (when just part of the breast is removed, not the entire breast)
SCIENCE
April 15, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
In a development unusual in an era when most disease-causing agents have already been found, government researchers have identified a new bacterium that causes a serious lymph node infection in some patients with suppressed immune systems. "The discovery of new bacteria is not uncommon, but discovering an organism that causes human illness is certainly unique," said Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni, director of the National Institutes of Health.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Elizabeth Edwards, wife of former Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. John Edwards, has begun chemotherapy to shrink a half-dollar-sized lump in her breast. Doctors found no sign the cancer had spread, a family spokesman said Wednesday. After a 16-week chemotherapy course, Edwards will take a four- to six-week break. Georgetown University Medical Center doctors who are treating Edwards will then surgically remove the lump.
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Removing and examining lymph nodes is a routine part of surgery for invasive breast cancer. Determining whether cancer cells have spread to the lymph system helps doctors "stage" the disease -- assess how extensive it is -- and then decide whether additional therapy, such as chemotherapy and radiation, is necessary. Traditionally, doctors perform a procedure called axillary (meaning underarm) lymph node dissection.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Sen. John McCain spent more than five hours in surgery Saturday to remove skin cancer from his temple and upper arm, and his doctor said preliminary findings show that the cancer had not spread to his lymph nodes. McCain's internist, John Eckstein, said the surgery to remove the two melanomas, the most serious form of skin cancer, went as expected without complications. The removal of the melanoma from his left arm involved a simple excision, Eckstein said.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In studies that may help unravel the mystery of why people infected with the AIDS virus live for years without developing symptoms, scientists have found that the virus--rather than being inactive during the early stages of infection--hides in the lymph system, where it is busy multiplying before it wages war on the body.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a new breast cancer drug for people whose disease has spread to the lymph nodes. The drug, when used after surgery with two other standard drugs, appears to significantly improve survival over another common regimen. But it also carries the risk of more side effects than the other treatments, a factor that raises the inevitable difficult choices patients and their physicians face in making breast cancer treatment decisions.
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