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NEWS
February 11, 1996 | Associated Press
A five-year, $4.3-million study of hundreds of women with breast cancer should show whether a high-tech scanning machine can safely replace painful lymph node surgery for women with breast cancer. The medical centers at the University of Michigan, Duke and Washington universities will conduct the studies. Researchers hope the positron emission tomography, or PET scan, will prove to be at least as reliable as dissection in finding cancer cells in lymph nodes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Anh Do
The family of Robert H. Schuller was "surprised" by the diagnosis that treatment for life-threatening cancer could give the famed evangelist another two more years, according to the church headed by his daughter. The 89-year-old has a growth in his esophagus and was initially told he had three months to live, said his daughter, Sheila Schuller Coleman, who first shared the news with worshipers during a sermon in late August. In follow-up exams, an  oncologist  advised Schuller that although the cancer had spread to his lymph nodes, he was "a good candidate for  chemotherapy  and radiation treatment that could extend his life," according to an online update on the Hope Center of Christ's website, the church headed by Schuller Coleman.
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SPORTS
February 24, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Mike Butcher was not overly concerned in mid-January when a routine visit to a doctor for a bone spur in his neck led to the discovery of a small growth and a trip to a specialist for a biopsy. "There was no doubt in my mind I didn't have anything wrong," the Angels' pitching coach said. "I thought maybe it was a cyst. " When test results showed he had papillary thyroid cancer, "My immediate reaction was 'Whoa,' you don't want to hear the C-word," said Butcher, 45. "I was shocked.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Andy Whitfield, star of the cable show "Spartacus: Blood and Sand," died Sunday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the age of 39. The Welsh-born actor who moved to Australia was diagnosed with the disease about a year and a half ago, and bowed out of filming the second season of the Starz show after the cancer was discovered, People magazine reported at the time. The Lymphoma Research Foundation says that rates for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have nearly doubled since the early 1970s.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Andy Whitfield, star of the cable show "Spartacus: Blood and Sand," died Sunday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the age of 39. The Welsh-born actor who moved to Australia was diagnosed with the disease about a year and a half ago, and bowed out of filming the second season of the Starz show after the cancer was discovered, People magazine reported at the time. The Lymphoma Research Foundation says that rates for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have nearly doubled since the early 1970s.
NEWS
January 28, 2009
Breast cancer: An article in Monday's Health section examining the medical facts in an episode of the TV series "Nip/Tuck" said that a diagnosis of Stage 2 breast cancer means that the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes. Though a designation of Stage 2 breast cancer often refers to a cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm, it can also refer to a tumor of a certain size that has not spread: Stage 2A can be a tumor (without spread) measuring 2 to 5 centimeters in diameter.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Women with early-stage breast cancer have plenty of procedures and treatments to deal with. So it may come as welcome news that a large clinical trial has found no reason for doctors to perform two tests that were thought to help predict patient survival. Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the researchers say that the test results are meaningless. The tests in question involve looking for micrometastasis - microscopic evidence of a breast tumor's spread - in sentinel lymph nodes and in bone marrow.
HEALTH
December 14, 2009 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"Nip/Tuck" Wednesday on FX Episode: "Lola Wlodkowski" The premise: Lola (Danica Sheridan), a morbidly obese woman, approaches Dr. Christian Troy (Julian McMahon) for weight-reduction surgery. Before proceeding with the planned liposuction and tummy tuck, Christian becomes sexually involved with his patient. He also discovers and biopsies a melanoma on her back, which has spread to her lymph nodes and will require chemotherapy. Meanwhile, Dr. Sean McNamara (Dylan Walsh)
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer survivors sometimes avoid strength training for fear it could increase their chances of lymphedema, blockage of the lymphatic system. But a study finds that a yearlong weightlifting program did not raise the risk of lymphedema among women who had had breast cancer. The study, released Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , followed 154 female breast cancer survivors who had at least two lymph nodes removed but were without symptoms of breast-cancer-related lymphedema when the study started.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Anh Do
The family of Robert H. Schuller was "surprised" by the diagnosis that treatment for life-threatening cancer could give the famed evangelist another two more years, according to the church headed by his daughter. The 89-year-old has a growth in his esophagus and was initially told he had three months to live, said his daughter, Sheila Schuller Coleman, who first shared the news with worshipers during a sermon in late August. In follow-up exams, an  oncologist  advised Schuller that although the cancer had spread to his lymph nodes, he was "a good candidate for  chemotherapy  and radiation treatment that could extend his life," according to an online update on the Hope Center of Christ's website, the church headed by Schuller Coleman.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Women with early-stage breast cancer have plenty of procedures and treatments to deal with. So it may come as welcome news that a large clinical trial has found no reason for doctors to perform two tests that were thought to help predict patient survival. Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the researchers say that the test results are meaningless. The tests in question involve looking for micrometastasis - microscopic evidence of a breast tumor's spread - in sentinel lymph nodes and in bone marrow.
HEALTH
June 13, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Joe (Ray Romano) and Manfro (Jon Manfrellotti) are good friends who go to a strip club the night before Manfro is scheduled to begin chemotherapy to treat Stage 3 colon cancer. Manfro, whose tumor had spread to his lymph nodes by the time it was detected in a colonoscopy screening exam, has already had surgery to remove the bulk of his tumor. At the club, he meets a stripper whose father also has Stage 3 colon cancer and went to the same oncologist that is treating Manfro.
SPORTS
February 24, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Mike Butcher was not overly concerned in mid-January when a routine visit to a doctor for a bone spur in his neck led to the discovery of a small growth and a trip to a specialist for a biopsy. "There was no doubt in my mind I didn't have anything wrong," the Angels' pitching coach said. "I thought maybe it was a cyst. " When test results showed he had papillary thyroid cancer, "My immediate reaction was 'Whoa,' you don't want to hear the C-word," said Butcher, 45. "I was shocked.
HEALTH
February 18, 2011 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes less is more in breast cancer treatment; so says a study that made headlines earlier this month: The finding, published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., reported that surgically removing multiple cancer-containing lymph nodes under the arm in women with small tumors — instead of just one or two — may cause more harm than good. The finding seems to fly in the face of what most people believe — that cancers must be treated aggressively for the best odds of recovery and survival.
HEALTH
February 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Some women with early-stage breast cancer may be cured without the need to remove multiple lymph nodes, which has been the standard practice, researchers reported Tuesday. Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for evidence that the cancer has spread. However, a new study found that people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node fared just as well after treatment without the removal of additional lymph nodes in the armpit area.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for signs that the cancer has spread. However, people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node may not need to have additional lymph nodes removed. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , researchers  examined patients who had an early-stage tumor. All of the patients had their tumors removed with lumpectomy (when just part of the breast is removed, not the entire breast)
MAGAZINE
March 13, 1994
"Sisters in Arms" (Three on the Town, by Wanda Coleman, Feb. 6) puts a racial edge on a universal medical problem. Doctors, especially surgeons, are not sensitive enough to women. I found a lump. My general practitioner, a surgeon and a mammogram all said it was nothing. Six weeks later, I went back to the surgeon ready to fight. "I want you to either biopsy this lump or aspirate it, and do it now," I said. When he aspirated the lump, I saw a cloud pass across the eyes of the nurse, and the doctor scheduled a biopsy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Survival rates for a common type of childhood cancer improved markedly at a leading medical center after doctors started using chemotherapy more aggressively, a study showed last week. In findings presented at the Society for Pediatric Research's annual meeting, Dr. Laura Bowman of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., said the overall four-year survival rate for neuroblastoma has improved from 37% to 55% during the last decade. Neuroblastoma, which originates in the adrenal gland or nerve tissue near the spinal cord, is the most common childhood solid tumor after brain tumors, Bowman noted.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer survivors sometimes avoid strength training for fear it could increase their chances of lymphedema, blockage of the lymphatic system. But a study finds that a yearlong weightlifting program did not raise the risk of lymphedema among women who had had breast cancer. The study, released Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , followed 154 female breast cancer survivors who had at least two lymph nodes removed but were without symptoms of breast-cancer-related lymphedema when the study started.
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