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NEWS
October 13, 1998 | Associated Press
Campers and residents in the upper Sierra have been warned to keep their pets indoors after bubonic plague was found in a cat and two chipmunks. While no humans have been stricken, the Nevada County Department of Environmental Health has issued a "plague alert," listing precautions that should be taken. Bubonic plague, carried by infected fleas, can be transmitted to humans by rodents or pets that come in contact with them.
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NEWS
July 2, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Researchers are beginning to make some strides toward attacking the AIDS virus in its last hiding place in the body, the hitherto impregnable forts of the immune system, where HIV safely hides from the bomb bursts of combination therapy. Scientists in California and elsewhere are attacking these redoubts with new vigor because they know that HIV-positive people can never be weaned from toxic, expensive AIDS drugs until the last viral troops are scourged from the body.
HEALTH
November 17, 1997 | NADIA LERNER, THE STAMFORD ADVOCATE
"It's a heartbreaking experience," says Diane Ehlers, whose leg started to swell up several years after she underwent radiation therapy for recurrent cervical cancer. The Stamford, Conn., woman, whose cancer surgery required lymph node removal, then learned she had lymphedema--a condition caused by an accumulation of lymph fluid that produces swelling. That was 10 years ago, a time when there was no effective treatment, Ehlers says. "I was out there with no help," she says.
SPORTS
April 8, 1997 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brett Butler, scratched from the starting lineup after complaining of pain in his neck, raced home with the winning run on Tom Prince's infield single with two out in the 15th to lift the Dodgers to a 3-2 victory over the New York Mets at Dodger Stadium on Monday night. The Dodgers spent much of the day fearing the unknown, praying Butler's visit to an ear, nose and throat specialist was just a routine examination that would discover nothing abnormal.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Molli Mullen begins her last chemotherapy treatment today. Just as sure as the Adriamycin drips into her bloodstream over the next 48 hours, she knows she will feel lousy exactly 10 days from now. She will be lightheaded, cranky and virtually unable to move. The fuzz she has for hair will fall out again and sores will develop inside her mouth. She has done this long enough to know the routine and the after-effects from the treatment that could save her life.
SPORTS
May 29, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger center fielder Brett Butler said he has been told that the lymph nodes removed during his second surgery were not malignant, an indication the cancer has not spread. Butler had one cancerous thumb-sized lymph-node tumor removed during surgery May 3, and 49 other lymph nodes were taken May 21 and tested. Butler called the Dodgers from his Atlanta home to inform the team that biopsy results showed that the 49 lymph nodes were all benign.
SPORTS
May 22, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After all the cancer that was evident was removed in a three-hour operation Tuesday on Brett Butler's neck and throat, surgeon William Grist said that he is optimistic about the Dodger center fielder's chances for a full recovery. "Everything went as well as it possibly could have," Grist, Emory University Hospital's chief of head and neck surgery, told Butler's wife, Eveline, upon emerging from the operating room. "Nothing happened that we didn't plan."
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | Associated Press
A five-year, $4.3-million study of hundreds of women with breast cancer should show whether a high-tech scanning machine can safely replace painful lymph node surgery for women with breast cancer. The medical centers at the University of Michigan, Duke and Washington universities will conduct the studies. Researchers hope the positron emission tomography, or PET scan, will prove to be at least as reliable as dissection in finding cancer cells in lymph nodes.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lemme tell you how I was taught to take care of my skin in Ohio. Soap. Ivory soap. So-pure-it-floats soap. And water. And a washcloth. Simplistic, perhaps. But that's the Midwestern way. And it's served me well for 25 years. Then I get this job in Los Angeles, where nothing--not even ordering coffee--is simple. So it shouldn't have surprised me, I suppose, that people out here are very serious about their skin. Especially the skin on their faces. Enter Arcona and her holistic beauty therapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new procedure that could minimize unnecessary surgery for breast cancer patients and help guide their therapy has been developed by surgeons at the John Wayne Cancer Institute in Santa Monica. The new technique, which involves injection of a blue dye into a tumor before it is surgically removed, makes it easier for surgeons to determine whether the cancer has metastasized--or spread into the lymph glands--Dr. Armando Giuliano and his colleagues report today in the journal Annals of Surgery.
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