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Lynda La Plante

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2008 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
When Lynda La Plante, a mother of the female-led cop drama, looks among this year's Emmy nominees, it's almost as if she were welcoming relatives to a family gathering. Four of the five lead actresses nominated for their work in a dramatic series owe something to Jane Tennison -- the pioneering TV detective who was the centerpiece of the Liverpool native's award-winning British series "Prime Suspect," which later migrated to the United States and won its share of Emmys here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2008 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
When Lynda La Plante, a mother of the female-led cop drama, looks among this year's Emmy nominees, it's almost as if she were welcoming relatives to a family gathering. Four of the five lead actresses nominated for their work in a dramatic series owe something to Jane Tennison -- the pioneering TV detective who was the centerpiece of the Liverpool native's award-winning British series "Prime Suspect," which later migrated to the United States and won its share of Emmys here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
FOR those who love mysteries, and only wish that American crime writer Patricia Cornwell had a dirtier mind, "Above Suspicion" is their book. With the book's American release, Lynda La Plante, the British author of the "Prime Suspect" novels, is back with more bondage, buggery and blasphemy. La Plante doesn't simply murder a series of prostitutes here but has them trussed by their underwear, raped, sodomized and left to rot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
FOR those who love mysteries, and only wish that American crime writer Patricia Cornwell had a dirtier mind, "Above Suspicion" is their book. With the book's American release, Lynda La Plante, the British author of the "Prime Suspect" novels, is back with more bondage, buggery and blasphemy. La Plante doesn't simply murder a series of prostitutes here but has them trussed by their underwear, raped, sodomized and left to rot.
BOOKS
May 12, 1996 | MARGO KAUFMAN
I'm a fan of "Prime Suspect," the Emmy award-winning series created by Lynda La Plante, even though Detective Inspector Jane Tennyson, played by Helen Mirren, has no people skills and should be sentenced to three months of charm school. Amazingly, Tennyson is a social butterfly compared to Lorraine Page, the grim heroine of La Plante's riveting, if predictable, "Cold Shoulder."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The popular 1983 British series "Widows" marked the first women-in-crime success of writer Lynda La Plante, who went on to create the oft-brilliant "Prime Suspect," which brightened PBS and gave viewers fond memories of Helen Mirren as flawed, ambitious police Inspector Jane Tennison, who rose in the ranks despite opposition from her department's male coppers. "Widows" coincided in the U.S. with "Cagney and Lacey" when it came to deploying women as serious players in crime drama.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, Jeff Kaye is a frequent contributor to Calendar and TV Times
British suspense writer Lynda La Plante has become a sleuth herself. In the name of research, the creator of such acclaimed dramas as "Prime Suspect" was trying to track down and interview a sophisticated fugitive whose story would be the basis for her TV thriller, "Framed." It wouldn't be easy; he'd been declared dead. She had worked her police sources in London, met with criminals on the run in Spain and made a fruitless journey to Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Comedian Sandra Bernhard starts production today on "Real Wild Cinema," a new USA Network series that will feature Bernhard and a celebrity guest commenting each week on celebrated low-budget and off-beat movies. The hourlong series premieres on the cable network on April 21. . . . Sylvia Lopez took over Monday as co-anchor of KCAL-TV Channel 9's "Noon Report," joining co-anchor David Gonzales. Lopez's previous post as weekend anchor-reporter will be filled by Gay Yee.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Diana Rigg may never supplant Alistair Cooke. Yet one could make a case for "Mystery!" having eclipsed "Masterpiece Theatre" as the centerpiece drama series on PBS. And then help support it by citing "Prime Suspect," the crackling good three-parter from Britain's Granada Television opening at 9 tonight on KCET Channel 28 and KPBS Channel 15. The mystery in this new "Mystery!"--and it does keeps you guessing--centers on the identity of a particularly monstrous serial killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The popular 1983 British series "Widows" marked the first women-in-crime success of writer Lynda La Plante, who went on to create the oft-brilliant "Prime Suspect," which brightened PBS and gave viewers fond memories of Helen Mirren as flawed, ambitious police Inspector Jane Tennison, who rose in the ranks despite opposition from her department's male coppers. "Widows" coincided in the U.S. with "Cagney and Lacey" when it came to deploying women as serious players in crime drama.
BOOKS
May 12, 1996 | MARGO KAUFMAN
I'm a fan of "Prime Suspect," the Emmy award-winning series created by Lynda La Plante, even though Detective Inspector Jane Tennyson, played by Helen Mirren, has no people skills and should be sentenced to three months of charm school. Amazingly, Tennyson is a social butterfly compared to Lorraine Page, the grim heroine of La Plante's riveting, if predictable, "Cold Shoulder."
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, Jeff Kaye is a frequent contributor to Calendar and TV Times
British suspense writer Lynda La Plante has become a sleuth herself. In the name of research, the creator of such acclaimed dramas as "Prime Suspect" was trying to track down and interview a sophisticated fugitive whose story would be the basis for her TV thriller, "Framed." It wouldn't be easy; he'd been declared dead. She had worked her police sources in London, met with criminals on the run in Spain and made a fruitless journey to Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1995 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Old "Cheers" pals Sam Malone and Frasier Crane will reunite next month when Ted Danson guest stars on "Frasier" in a special episode for the ratings sweeps, NBC Entertainment President Warren Littlefield announced Monday during the semi-annual gathering of national television writers and critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
What's especially striking about the current issue of Vanity Fair is not how closely Ralph Fiennes resembles a demented, bare-chested, hair-teased Jesus on the cover. It's the portfolio inside of his fellow "Theater Royals" from Britain. At least a dozen have appeared on PBS in British dramas that, through the years, have comprised the class of television in the United States.
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