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Lyndon B Johnson

NEWS
November 22, 1992
Joseph Kaliff, 80, syndicated Broadway columnist who helped found the Caricaturists Society of America. He sketched every U.S. president from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Lyndon B. Johnson and entertainers such as Grace Kelly, Marilyn Monroe, Gregory Peck and John Wayne. In the 1950s and '60s Kaliff wrote a column called "Magic Carpet Over Broadway," which was syndicated to more than 90 weekly newspapers. On Friday in New York.
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NEWS
August 25, 1992 | JOANNE HARRISON, Joanne Harrison is an author and playwright in Houston, Tex
In 1965, the year of the Watts riot, Lyndon Baines Johnson saved my life. He was 53 and living in the White House. I was 16, barely hanging on in Boston's toughest white working-class neighborhood. We never met, and I can't imagine what would have happened if we had. People in the "nabe" hated his guts. Mockingly, they called him a "you all," the lowest thing they could think of. He talked weird--unlike us, whose dialect was unintelligible to all but those within a few miles of home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of charges and countercharges, debates, panel discussions, talk show appearances and Op-Ed pieces, it looked like the furor surrounding Oliver Stone's "JFK," might be quieting down. The Academy Awards were over and the film had received only two Oscars out of its eight nominations. Even before its release, "JFK" reignited a national debate about the circumstances behind the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN
Some of the revelations about Lyndon Baines Johnson in Robert Dallek's "Lone Star Rising": 1937: Johnson's congressional campaign allegedly gives Elliot Roosevelt, son of the President, a $5,000 bribe to send Johnson a telegram saying his election to the House would make him an asset to his father's Administration. 1939-40: Johnson helps get dozens of Jewish refugees out of Europe, securing false passports and one-way visas to Latin America for them, then transferring them to Texas.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they write about the wars over Lyndon Johnson's legacy, future historians may note that the opening salvos weren't fired in the Texas hill country or in the halls of Congress. Instead, they erupted at Lutece, the chic Manhattan restaurant. There, on a cool March night this year, Oxford University Press held a reception for UCLA history professor Robert Dallek on the publication of "Lone Star Rising," his biography of the 36th President.
NEWS
March 30, 1991
David F. (Mike) Smith, 75, Associated Press photographer who covered presidents and Hollywood stars for 44 years. The Los Angeles-based Smith's subjects included Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon, and entertainers Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy, Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck and James Stewart. A native of San Diego County, he was a past president of the Press Photographers Assn. of Greater Los Angeles. On Thursday in Burbank of cancer.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historian-as-flatterer staked out a point of view on a bright Maine morning. David Valdez slowly twisted his camera's lens, focusing on the President. He saw every tick, every emotion yet recorded a selective moment. On this warm summer day, when George Bush was managing a diplomatic crisis in the Middle East--and his vacation--Valdez, the President's personal photographer, faithfully trailed after him.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR
Everything about Lyndon Baines Johnson was outsized. His physical bulk, his energy, his ambition, his tirades, his deceptions and even his ears made Johnson a political mega-force. No less forceful is the work of Robert Caro.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
It is only 25 years since President Lyndon B. Johnson first declared his hopes and plans for a Great Society in America, but his words now sound as distant and strange as echoes from another epoch in another world. So remote do those times seem to the present era of budget restraints and hands-off government that the anniversary of Johnson's speech launching the Great Society--May 22, 1964, at the University of Michigan--passed entirely without notice.
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