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Lyndon Johnson

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NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
AUSTIN, Texas - President Obama has tried to model Abraham Lincoln's team of rivals and Teddy Roosevelt's power of the bully pulpit. He's lauded Ronald Reagan's communication skills and linked himself to the Kennedy clan. He's praised his onetime nemesis, George W. Bush, as well as his onetime adversary, Bill Clinton. But Obama has rarely cozied up to the predecessor some argue did more than any other modern president to pave the way for his election as the nation's first black president: Lyndon B. Johnson.
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OPINION
April 28, 2014 | By Bruce Ackerman
"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice," the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. assured his followers. But was he right? The arc of American history, at least, has a different shape. During the 19th century, a high point for justice was reached after the Civil War, with Reconstruction Republicans guaranteeing equal protection and voting rights for blacks in the 14th and 15th amendments. But these brave words did not prevent a tragic retreat, from the Gilded Age beginning in the 1880s through the Roaring '20s.
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NEWS
October 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former President Lyndon B. Johnson bragged he was a World War II hero, but he actually observed only 13 minutes of combat, according to a book to be published next year. An excerpt from the book "Means of Ascent" published in the New Yorker magazine declares the Silver Star that Johnson said he won for his heroism in World War II was merely a political gesture made by Gen. Douglas McArthur. The book's author, Robert A.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
AUSTIN, Texas - President Obama has tried to model Abraham Lincoln's team of rivals and Teddy Roosevelt's power of the bully pulpit. He's lauded Ronald Reagan's communication skills and linked himself to the Kennedy clan. He's praised his onetime nemesis, George W. Bush, as well as his onetime adversary, Bill Clinton. But Obama has rarely cozied up to the predecessor some argue did more than any other modern president to pave the way for his election as the nation's first black president: Lyndon B. Johnson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1994 | JACK VALENTI, Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, was a special assistant to Lyndon Johnson. and
It isn't necessarily so that one should pay attention to history lest one repeat it. But, as Damon Runyon would have commented, "That's the way to bet." To my eye, tutored by intimate White House experience, President Clinton should be admired and supported for being reluctant to get this nation bogged down in excursions far from home, in unwholesome terrain amid uncongenial folks armed with guns and anger, however misguided we fathom them to be. Clinton obviously is a devoted reader of history.
BOOKS
October 13, 1991 | Larry L. King, King was a congressional assistant to two Texas congressmen during years when L.B.J. was Senate majority leader and vice president; in 1964, he left Capitol Hill to write of politics
If things can be said to be looking up for a dead man, then things--at long last--are looking up for Lyndon B. Johnson.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | Jim Finley, Finley's fiction has been anthologized in "Best of the West" (Gibbs Smith). He teaches politics at College of the Mainland in Texas City, Tex. and
Lyndon B. Johnson's rise to national prominence was interrupted by seven of the darkest years of his adult life. These were years of despair, of self-doubt, of futile efforts to obtain what he craved more than anything--new and greater political clout.
BOOKS
August 11, 1991 | Michael R. Beschloss, Beschloss is the author, most recently, of "The Crisis Years: Kennedy and Khrushchev, 1960-1963" (HarperCollins)
Much of the pre-publication publicity for "Lone Star Rising" has cast this excellent volume as the rival to another biography with very different ambitions, Robert Caro's "The Years of Lyndon Johnson." This does it insufficient justice. Robert Dallek's book stands in the tradition of Stephen Ambrose's "Eisenhower"--lives of American Presidents viewed preeminently in the context of larger historical structures and themes. Dallek's previous major work, "Franklin D.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR
Everything about Lyndon Baines Johnson was outsized. His physical bulk, his energy, his ambition, his tirades, his deceptions and even his ears made Johnson a political mega-force. No less forceful is the work of Robert Caro.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush will spend Thanksgiving with U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf, the White House announced Friday. The trip will put an American President in a zone of potential warfare for the first time since Lyndon B. Johnson made a 2 1/2-hour visit to Vietnam on Oct. 26, 1966, during the height of the U.S. involvement in the war there. Bush will leave Washington on Nov. 16 at the start of an eight-day trip to Europe and the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - In the new Broadway play "All the Way," President Lyndon B. Johnson, played by Bryan Cranston, takes a break from wrangling votes for what would become the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to reflect on the trying nature of politics. Facing mounting pressure from the Southern faction of his party and civil rights leaders like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Johnson vents his frustrations to the audience. "Everybody wants power; everybody," he says. "And if they say they don't, they're lyin'.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Andrew Brimmer, the son of a Louisiana sharecropper who in 1966 became the first black member of the Federal Reserve Board, has died. He was 86. Brimmer died Oct. 7 at a Washington hospital after a lengthy illness, said his daughter, Esther Brimmer. An economist, Brimmer held a doctorate from Harvard Business School and several high-ranking positions in Washington. He worked as a staff economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and as an economics professor before being named a deputy assistant secretary of commerce under President John F. Kennedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Passage of Power The Years of Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Alfred A. Knopf: 736 pp., $35 "The Passage of Power," the fourth volume in Robert Caro's epic biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, encompasses the period of LBJ's deepest humiliation and his greatest accomplishment. It is a searing account of ambition derailed by personal demons in Johnson's unsuccessful bid for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination. It is a painful depiction of "greatness comically humbled" when Johnson gave up his unbridled authority as Senate majority leader to becomeJohn F. Kennedy's disdained vice president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Harry C. McPherson Jr., who served as special counsel and chief speechwriter for President Lyndon Johnson from 1966 to '69 and was a valued advisor to the president on civil rights, the Vietnam War and other policy issues, has died. He was 82. McPherson, who later became a prominent Washington lawyer and lobbyist, died Feb. 16 of complications of cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., said Hedrick Smith, a family friend. "Harry McPherson was a 'can do' man with sound judgment and treasured loyalty who could be counted on by generations of Johnsons," Luci Baines Johnson, the president's youngest daughter, said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Richard S. Amador Sr., a California-born son of migrant farmworkers who became a nationally recognized expert in community and economic development and formed a nonprofit group that created thousands of jobs for East Los Angeles residents, has died. He was 75. Amador died of esophageal cancer Sept. 19 at his home in Monterey Park, said his daughter, Cynthia Amador-Diaz. In 1967, Amador founded what became known as CHARO Community Development Corp., a nonprofit organization that was headquartered in East L.A. for more than four decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2011 | By Elizabeth Mehren, Special to the Los Angeles Times
R. Sargent Shriver, a lawyer who served as the social conscience of two administrations, launching the Peace Corps for his brother-in-law, President Kennedy, and leading the "war on poverty" for President Johnson, has died. He was 95. Shriver died Tuesday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., his family said in a statement. His health had been in decline since he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2003. His illness moved his daughter, California's then-First Lady Maria Shriver, to testify before Congress in 2009 about the disease's "terrifying" reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - In the new Broadway play "All the Way," President Lyndon B. Johnson, played by Bryan Cranston, takes a break from wrangling votes for what would become the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to reflect on the trying nature of politics. Facing mounting pressure from the Southern faction of his party and civil rights leaders like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Johnson vents his frustrations to the audience. "Everybody wants power; everybody," he says. "And if they say they don't, they're lyin'.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999
1964 again? Has anybody noticed that Bill Clinton is starting to look like Lyndon Johnson? DAVID FOX Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Liz Carpenter, an author and former press secretary to First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, died Saturday at an Austin, Texas, hospital after contracting pneumonia earlier in the week, said her daughter, Christy Carpenter. She was 89. On Nov. 22, 1963, Carpenter scribbled the 58 words that Lyndon Johnson delivered to the nation when he returned to Washington from Dallas after the assassination of President Kennedy: "This is a sad time for all people. We have suffered a loss that cannot be weighed.
OPINION
March 30, 2008 | James R. Jones, James R. Jones was appointments secretary to President Johnson in 1968. he later served in Congress, as U.S. ambassador to Mexico and as chief executive of the American Stock Exchange. He is now a partner at the law firm Manatt, Phelps & Phillips.
Forty years ago tomorrow, President Lyndon B. Johnson shocked the nation with his televised announcement that he would not run for another term as president. "I shall not seek, and I will not accept, the nomination of my party for another term as your president," he said on that night in 1968. Since then, there has been much speculation about what motivated his decision. Many believe he dropped out because he feared he would lose and wanted to avoid the humiliation.
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