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Lynn Bartosh

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July 6, 1997 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sure, they've come a long way. The inception of two pro basketball leagues in the past year and a greater awareness of Title IX's gender-equity provisions point to the gains women are making in athletics. But preparing women to take advantage of opportunities hasn't always come easy. Lynn Bartosh recalls the apprehension she felt coming out of Ventura High in 1976 and embarking on a college basketball career at UCLA. "It was an eye-opener," she said.
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SPORTS
July 6, 1997 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sure, they've come a long way. The inception of two pro basketball leagues in the past year and a greater awareness of Title IX's gender-equity provisions point to the gains women are making in athletics. But preparing women to take advantage of opportunities hasn't always come easy. Lynn Bartosh recalls the apprehension she felt coming out of Ventura High in 1976 and embarking on a college basketball career at UCLA. "It was an eye-opener," she said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999
The number of new AIDS cases in Ventura County has dropped for the second year in a row, but health officials warn that the number of people contracting the HIV virus may be growing, because it usually takes about 10 years for someone who has contracted HIV to come down with AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AIDS cases are on the decline in Ventura County, but the number of instances in which people are contracting the virus that leads to the deadly disease is increasing, a county health official said Wednesday. About 350 county residents have been diagnosed with AIDS, but an estimated 1,000 to 4,000 people are likely to be infected with HIV, said Lynn Bartosh, who runs the AIDS surveillance program for the county Public Health Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The number of new AIDS cases in Ventura County has dropped for the second year in a row, but health officials warn that the number of people contracting the HIV virus may be growing. It usually takes about 10 years for someone who has the virus to manifest AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2003 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
California's HIV reporting system has been hobbled in its first six months by the failure of some doctors and clinics to provide the data required by law, county health officials say. If the problems are not resolved, authorities say, they won't be able to track the epidemic's spread. And California risks coming up short as early as next year, when the federal government begins linking its treatment and service grants to the number of state HIV cases. "It's a disaster," Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2004 | Lynne Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Teresa Martinez-Ponce got the news from her boss: A woman had delivered an HIV-positive baby at Ventura County Medical Center and then disappeared, leaving the boy to be put up for adoption. The name and address the woman had given were false. Martinez-Ponce, an outreach worker with the county's Public Health Department, was assigned to the case. Her mission: Find the woman and make sure she was being treated for AIDS.
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