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Lynn Dabney

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
During most of her working life, Lynn Dabney, a 36-year-old Los Angeles journeyman electrician, has groused about being the only woman on the job. Most women in construction know the feeling. In an era of countless feminist advances, the proportion of women in the building trades has lingered at around 2% for at least a decade. Contractors are still sexist and unions are still clannish, critics say. Dabney thinks she has found an answer, though.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | Danica Kirka
With union jobs, at least I get paid what the men get paid. I think economics is a big basis for all the problems (wom en) have in the society. You know, 60 cents on the dollar. One of the most difficult problems women have on the job is that barrier they face because of their gender. It has nothing to do with the job itself. It's survival skills in that sort of isolated experience. Most women in the trades want more women in the trades. We feel that if more women come into the trades, we won't be so isolated and we won't be viewed as representative of our entire gender.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | Danica Kirka
With union jobs, at least I get paid what the men get paid. I think economics is a big basis for all the problems (wom en) have in the society. You know, 60 cents on the dollar. One of the most difficult problems women have on the job is that barrier they face because of their gender. It has nothing to do with the job itself. It's survival skills in that sort of isolated experience. Most women in the trades want more women in the trades. We feel that if more women come into the trades, we won't be so isolated and we won't be viewed as representative of our entire gender.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
During most of her working life, Lynn Dabney, a 36-year-old Los Angeles journeyman electrician, has groused about being the only woman on the job. Most women in construction know the feeling. In an era of countless feminist advances, the proportion of women in the building trades has lingered at around 2% for at least a decade. Contractors are still sexist and unions are still clannish, critics say. Dabney thinks she has found an answer, though.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anne Brophy was working in an office and hating it in 1979 when her husband suggested she take a test with him for an engineering apprenticeship. She outscored him. She also bettered a male friend who took the exam. But although placement was supposedly based on test scores, her friend was called for a job first. After protesting, Brophy finally got an apprenticeship. "Four years of hell," she calls it. "You're not dealing with the more liberal, progressive members of society," she notes dryly.
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