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Lynn Manning

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The night a stranger shot him in the eye, Lynn Manning was coming off a "smog-free picture-postcard day in Los Angeles," full of good prospects: a job promotion as house director of a boys' home; a scheduled reunion later that evening with an ex-girlfriend; at the bar, a little while before the shooting, killer rounds of pinball. Then came the encounter with someone itching to teach Manning some "respect."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The night a stranger shot him in the eye, Lynn Manning was coming off a "smog-free picture-postcard day in Los Angeles," full of good prospects: a job promotion as house director of a boys' home; a scheduled reunion later that evening with an ex-girlfriend; at the bar, a little while before the shooting, killer rounds of pinball. Then came the encounter with someone itching to teach Manning some "respect."
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SPORTS
August 31, 1990 | CURTIS EICHELBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years ago, Lynn Manning was fighting for his life. A gunshot to the head nearly killed him and left him blind. Last month, he gained international recognition by winning a gold medal in judo at the World Games for the Disabled in the Netherlands. Ironically, the events that accompanied his troubled childhood might have been most responsible for leading him beyond the limits of his disability and into that judo final.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an era of hucksters, hype and 15-minute celebrities, Lynn Manning is that rarest of valuable commodities. Manning is an artist. Not in the cheapened modern sense of the word, that generic meaning that is misapplied to every Hollywood deal maker with a high concept and a cell phone. Manning is the real thing, a writer of clarity, finesse and overriding humanity. Manning also happens to be blind.
SPORTS
November 6, 1990
Lynn Manning, a blind judoist from Los Angeles, has been nominated by the U.S. Assn. for Blind Athletes to receive a National Disabled Sports Award from the U.S. Olympic Committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's nearly dinner time on a Sunday evening and the dimly lit warehouse-turned-theater of the Watts Labor Community Action Committee is filled with more than two dozen men, women and children, ranging in age from 6 to 81. With the exception of a few kids who troop in and out of the room, oblivious to the rehearsal in progress, everyone's attention is focused on theater director Bill Rauch.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When blind men start carrying 9mm handguns, you know L.A. has taken a real nasty turn. That's what playwright Lynn Manning feared several years ago when he tried to stop a blind friend from buying a gun. He remembers making the argument that "it's bad enough when somebody who can see packs a piece on the street." And Manning should know. In 1978, at the age of 23, he was shot in a Hollywood bar by a deranged man he had argued with earlier in the evening. The blast robbed Manning of his sight.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an era of hucksters, hype and 15-minute celebrities, Lynn Manning is that rarest of valuable commodities. Manning is an artist. Not in the cheapened modern sense of the word, that generic meaning that is misapplied to every Hollywood deal maker with a high concept and a cell phone. Manning is the real thing, a writer of clarity, finesse and overriding humanity. Manning also happens to be blind.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2001
Wrong numbers--The reservation number for Gold Dust Orphans' production of Ryan Landry's comic "Medea" at Celebration Theatre in Hollywood is (310) 289-2999; the reservation number for the Mark Taper Forum's "Taper Too 2001" production of Lynn Manning's drama, "Weights," at the Actors' Gang in Hollywood, is (213) 628-2772. Incorrect numbers ran in Sunday Calendar and Calendar Weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"Visitations," Lynn Manning's one-acts at the Zephyr, addresses issues of great brutality, lingering rancor and whether the cleansing process of forgiveness is still possible in the present. "The Convert" introduces us to Todd Brewer (Glen Porter), a condemned serial slayer who, like Saul, is struck stone-blind by a miraculous Christian epiphany. Exalted by his new faith, Brewer asks the Rev. Coleman (John Bentley) to seek the forgiveness of his various victims' families.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's nearly dinner time on a Sunday evening and the dimly lit warehouse-turned-theater of the Watts Labor Community Action Committee is filled with more than two dozen men, women and children, ranging in age from 6 to 81. With the exception of a few kids who troop in and out of the room, oblivious to the rehearsal in progress, everyone's attention is focused on theater director Bill Rauch.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When blind men start carrying 9mm handguns, you know L.A. has taken a real nasty turn. That's what playwright Lynn Manning feared several years ago when he tried to stop a blind friend from buying a gun. He remembers making the argument that "it's bad enough when somebody who can see packs a piece on the street." And Manning should know. In 1978, at the age of 23, he was shot in a Hollywood bar by a deranged man he had argued with earlier in the evening. The blast robbed Manning of his sight.
SPORTS
November 6, 1990
Lynn Manning, a blind judoist from Los Angeles, has been nominated by the U.S. Assn. for Blind Athletes to receive a National Disabled Sports Award from the U.S. Olympic Committee.
SPORTS
August 31, 1990 | CURTIS EICHELBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years ago, Lynn Manning was fighting for his life. A gunshot to the head nearly killed him and left him blind. Last month, he gained international recognition by winning a gold medal in judo at the World Games for the Disabled in the Netherlands. Ironically, the events that accompanied his troubled childhood might have been most responsible for leading him beyond the limits of his disability and into that judo final.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lynn Manning is a local hero of sorts. Raised in South-Central and blinded in a bar brawl at age 23, he's been artistically reborn as a writer-performer of note--as evidenced by his "On the Blink" at the Lex Theater. As the title suggests, Manning doesn't shy away from vision metaphors and other ways of pointing up his own condition. His often confrontational writings usually focus on literally or figuratively unsighted people.
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