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Lynn Martin

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OPINION
March 15, 1992 | Jefferson Morley, Jefferson Morley is a former associate editor of the New Republic and Washington editor of the Nation. He interviewed Lynn Martin in her office
Lynn Martin is cheerful, but then again she has to be. She is secretary of labor while American workers endure the worst recession in a decade. Her job is to advance the interests of working people while reporting to a President whose highest economic priority remains reducing taxes paid by capitalists. In person, Martin has the down-to-earth style of a high-school homeroom teacher--which she once was.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | From Washington Post
A task force headed by former Labor Secretary Lynn Martin on Wednesday recommended major changes in the management operations of Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America Inc. to end the practices that prompted the federal government to file the biggest sexual-harassment lawsuit in its history.
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NEWS
January 31, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary-designate Lynn Martin won bipartisan praise Wednesday at her Senate confirmation hearing, where she stressed that "skills training may be the most important task we undertake." Martin also said she would move to protect retirement pension plans and emphasize on-the-job safety. Although she voted against the civil rights bill as a Republican member of Congress last year, Martin has been in the forefront of many women's issues.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES
When former Labor Secretary Lynn Martin first saw news reports about sexual harassment allegations at a Mitsubishi auto plant in Illinois, she was reminded of the unfair attitude many rape victims face: that they must have asked for it. And when Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America executives phoned her Chicago office for help, she planned to pass.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lynn Martin Rebuffed: The Communications Workers of America scrapped an appearance in San Francisco by Labor Secretary Lynn Martin because the Bush Administration is opposed to a bill that outlaws permanent strikebreakers. About 3,000 delegates of the 650,000-member union gave a rousing ovation when one suggested that they all walk off the floor when Martin showed up to give a speech.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
The AFL-CIO is not inviting Lynn Martin to its convention in Detroit next month, marking the first time in nearly a decade that a labor secretary has been spurned by the organization. The 14.2-million-member organization's decision to shun Martin points up the animosity between unions and the Bush Administration, which have frequently been at odds over issues that affect working Americans.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | Associated Press
Labor Secretary Lynn Martin outlined this four-point program 'to dismantle, to remove and to shatter' the so-called 'glass ceiling' that bars women and minorities from advancing up the corporate ladder: Further reviews of working conditions and hiring practices such as those conducted by the Labor Department at nine U.S. firms. An internal effort to educate Labor Department officials on the glass-ceiling issue.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
Illinois Republican Lynn Martin was sworn in Friday as labor secretary, and President Bush said she would become "a powerful force for good" in the American workplace. "I know that Lynn Martin is also committed to reaching out to America's workers," Bush told hundreds of Labor Department officials and Republicans who turned out for the ceremony. Martin, 51, a former congresswoman from Rockford, Ill., promised to do "the best job I know how."
BUSINESS
May 15, 1996 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing government and private lawsuits alleging hundreds of incidents of sexual harassment, Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America announced Tuesday that former U.S. Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin has been hired to review workplace environment issues at the company's Normal, Ill., factory. But the company gave no indication that it will try to settle charges brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or three private lawsuits brought by a total of 30 women employed at the plant.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Labor Secretary Lynn Martin conceded Tuesday that little has changed since she vowed a year ago to help women and minorities land America's top corporate jobs. "We continue to find a general absence of minorities and women at the highest levels in the corporate work force, in the developmental programs and in the credential-building assignments," she said at a news conference to release "Pipelines of Progress: A Status Report on the Glass Ceiling."
BUSINESS
May 15, 1996 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing government and private lawsuits alleging hundreds of incidents of sexual harassment, Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America announced Tuesday that former U.S. Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin has been hired to review workplace environment issues at the company's Normal, Ill., factory. But the company gave no indication that it will try to settle charges brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or three private lawsuits brought by a total of 30 women employed at the plant.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1992 | From Reuters
Labor Secretary Lynn Martin ran into sharp Senate criticism Thursday for the Administration's failure to explain how it would finance the retraining of workers who might lose their jobs from a continental free trade agreement. Martin said the trade pact should result in a net U.S. job increase but stressed that the retraining funds were there to help those who lost jobs--which she estimated at a maximum of 150,000.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Labor Secretary Lynn Martin conceded Tuesday that little has changed since she vowed a year ago to help women and minorities land America's top corporate jobs. "We continue to find a general absence of minorities and women at the highest levels in the corporate work force, in the developmental programs and in the credential-building assignments," she said at a news conference to release "Pipelines of Progress: A Status Report on the Glass Ceiling."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992
Awfully nice of Labor Secretary Lynn Martin to smear all Americans who don't sign their own paychecks with her statement that " . . . their (labor's) agenda is not America's" (Interview, Opinion, March 15). If Martin would take a look across the Atlantic or Pacific oceans she would see that the industrialized nations beating us in the marketplace, standard of living, worker productivity, infant mortality, literacy rates, leisure time, in fact every quantifiable quality-of-life factor, are nations with either a large and powerful labor union movement, or nations with such enlightened attitudes toward people who work for a living as to obviate the need for a labor movement.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three members of President Bush's Cabinet, led by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, sheepishly acknowledged Tuesday that they had written bad checks on accounts at the House bank while they served in Congress--admissions that instantly changed the political complexion of the scandal. Cheney, standing beside poster-sized blowups of bank statements and sample checks at a Pentagon news conference, said he overdrew his account 25 times in eight months.
OPINION
March 15, 1992 | Jefferson Morley, Jefferson Morley is a former associate editor of the New Republic and Washington editor of the Nation. He interviewed Lynn Martin in her office
Lynn Martin is cheerful, but then again she has to be. She is secretary of labor while American workers endure the worst recession in a decade. Her job is to advance the interests of working people while reporting to a President whose highest economic priority remains reducing taxes paid by capitalists. In person, Martin has the down-to-earth style of a high-school homeroom teacher--which she once was.
TRAVEL
October 27, 1991
Lest Donald J. Sinex's Sept. 22 letter panning cruising influence anyone who has not yet treated themselves to this ultimate in a relaxed, do-whatever-you-desire vacation, I want to say first, after three cruises, that we have yet to have a "putrid" cabin. Even the smallest was fresh and was kept spotless by our steward, whose hand was never extended for anything, except to serve. The size of your cabin is directly tied to what you pay and there is surely an added joy in an outside cabin with a picture window.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush said today that he will nominate outgoing Illinois Rep. Lynn Martin as his new secretary of labor. Bush called Martin a "distinguished public servant and cherished friend" in naming her to the post. Martin, 51, will succeed Elizabeth Hanford Dole, who stepped down to head the American Red Cross. A 10-year House Republican, Martin has longstanding ties to Bush.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Bush Administration Cabinet officials attacked a key Democratic proposal Thursday that would require all businesses to offer health insurance, declaring that it would cost employers $30 billion a year and have a devastating effect on employment. In an unusual joint news conference, Labor Secretary Lynn Martin and Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan took the political offensive and blasted the "pay or play" plans sponsored by key congressional Democrats.
TRAVEL
October 27, 1991
Lest Donald J. Sinex's Sept. 22 letter panning cruising influence anyone who has not yet treated themselves to this ultimate in a relaxed, do-whatever-you-desire vacation, I want to say first, after three cruises, that we have yet to have a "putrid" cabin. Even the smallest was fresh and was kept spotless by our steward, whose hand was never extended for anything, except to serve. The size of your cabin is directly tied to what you pay and there is surely an added joy in an outside cabin with a picture window.
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