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NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - So much for political fatigue. Television viewers appeared hungry to watch the second matchup between President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, with an estimated 65.6 million people tuning in to watch Tuesday night's debate between the two men at Hofstra University, according to Nielsen . That was just a 2% dip from the 67.2 million who watched the first debate on Oct. 3. The biggest drop-off was among television...
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NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) called Monday's debate “a night of reckoning” for Mitt Romney, repeatedly saying the onus is on the Republican nominee to “show specificity” with regard to his foreign policy vision. “The Romney campaign is trying to say to people, 'Well, if he just comes out there and shows he's competent, he'll be OK.' No. That's not the standard for commander in chief,” Kerry told reporters in the spin room at Lynn University, the site of the third and final presidential debate.
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NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) called Monday's debate “a night of reckoning” for Mitt Romney, repeatedly saying the onus is on the Republican nominee to “show specificity” with regard to his foreign policy vision. “The Romney campaign is trying to say to people, 'Well, if he just comes out there and shows he's competent, he'll be OK.' No. That's not the standard for commander in chief,” Kerry told reporters in the spin room at Lynn University, the site of the third and final presidential debate.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney debated foreign policy at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla., on Monday night. Though moderator Bob Schieffer laid out an agenda , which included our next steps in Afghanistan, dealing with nuclear Iran and negotiating with China, the candidates continuously shifted their focus back to domestic issues . “Rom hits nail on head: Says strong economy will mean strong foreign presence,” tweeted...
NATIONAL
November 14, 2005 | Jennifer Peltz, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
The highest-paid college president in the country isn't at Harvard. Or at Ohio State University, where more than 50,000 students make up the nation's biggest non-online university. Or at any college in pricey Boston, New York, Los Angeles or San Francisco. He's on a small suburban campus in Boca Raton, Fla., running a university with 2,800 students, 15 undergraduate majors, a handful of graduate degrees and a fourth-tier ranking in the U.S. News & World Report college guide.
SPORTS
March 30, 2007 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
Forget basket weaving. A group of sports management majors at Lynn University in South Florida are picking three easy, but pricey, credits this weekend as part of a course entitled, "The Final Four Experience." And students at Georgetown thought "Philosophy and Star Trek" was a gimme. "We said to ourselves, 'What's the best way to teach our students?' " professor Theodore Curtis told the Associated Press.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney debated foreign policy at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla., on Monday night. Though moderator Bob Schieffer laid out an agenda , which included our next steps in Afghanistan, dealing with nuclear Iran and negotiating with China, the candidates continuously shifted their focus back to domestic issues . “Rom hits nail on head: Says strong economy will mean strong foreign presence,” tweeted...
BOOKS
April 15, 2007 | Donna Seaman, Donna Seaman is an associate editor for Booklist, editor of the anthology "In Our Nature: Stories of Wildness" and host of the radio program "Open Books" in Chicago. Seaman's author interviews are collected in "Writers on the Air."
"BECAUSE a fire was in my head" is a line from "The Song of Wandering Aengus," a poem by the great Irish poet William Butler Yeats. Happily, Lynn Stegner makes good on her borrowing in this portrait of an amoral, redheaded woman vagabond who cuts a swath of psychic destruction from the prairies of Canada to the beaches of Northern California. Young, pert and dimply Kate Riley is a descendant of Irish immigrants who settled on the vast and comfortless plains of Saskatchewan.
SPORTS
March 14, 1989
Lynn Archibald, University of Utah basketball coach for the last six seasons, was fired.
SPORTS
November 28, 1991
After pool play in the National Assn. of Intercollegiate Athletics championship tournament in Boca Raton, Fla., Wednesday, The Master's College men's soccer team failed to advance to Friday's semifinal round. Master's (12-9-1), which was seeded 11th in the 12-team field, beat second-seeded Rockhurst (Mo.), 4-1, Monday in the first round of pool play, then lost to seventh-seeded Alderson Broaddus College (W. Va.), 6-0, Tuesday in the second round.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - So much for political fatigue. Television viewers appeared hungry to watch the second matchup between President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, with an estimated 65.6 million people tuning in to watch Tuesday night's debate between the two men at Hofstra University, according to Nielsen . That was just a 2% dip from the 67.2 million who watched the first debate on Oct. 3. The biggest drop-off was among television...
BOOKS
April 15, 2007 | Donna Seaman, Donna Seaman is an associate editor for Booklist, editor of the anthology "In Our Nature: Stories of Wildness" and host of the radio program "Open Books" in Chicago. Seaman's author interviews are collected in "Writers on the Air."
"BECAUSE a fire was in my head" is a line from "The Song of Wandering Aengus," a poem by the great Irish poet William Butler Yeats. Happily, Lynn Stegner makes good on her borrowing in this portrait of an amoral, redheaded woman vagabond who cuts a swath of psychic destruction from the prairies of Canada to the beaches of Northern California. Young, pert and dimply Kate Riley is a descendant of Irish immigrants who settled on the vast and comfortless plains of Saskatchewan.
SPORTS
March 30, 2007 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
Forget basket weaving. A group of sports management majors at Lynn University in South Florida are picking three easy, but pricey, credits this weekend as part of a course entitled, "The Final Four Experience." And students at Georgetown thought "Philosophy and Star Trek" was a gimme. "We said to ourselves, 'What's the best way to teach our students?' " professor Theodore Curtis told the Associated Press.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2005 | Jennifer Peltz, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
The highest-paid college president in the country isn't at Harvard. Or at Ohio State University, where more than 50,000 students make up the nation's biggest non-online university. Or at any college in pricey Boston, New York, Los Angeles or San Francisco. He's on a small suburban campus in Boca Raton, Fla., running a university with 2,800 students, 15 undergraduate majors, a handful of graduate degrees and a fourth-tier ranking in the U.S. News & World Report college guide.
SPORTS
April 1, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Eleven black former players for Lynn Nance, University of Washington basketball coach, disputed allegations of racism against him. Also speaking in his defense at a news conference with Nance in Bellevue, Wash., was Nance's former daughter-in-law, Nichole Nance, who is black. Nance said the parents of player Andy Woods began calling him a racist after Woods' playing time decreased in January.
BOOKS
January 6, 1985
The Air-Line to Seattle: Studies in Literary and Historical Writing About America, Kenneth S. Lynn (University of Chicago). History professor's witty, iconoclastic collection of essays concerns literary and historical writing about America. Black Apollo of Science: The Life of Ernest Everett Just, Kenneth R. Manning (Oxford). Biography of a slave's grandson who worked against the odds to become one of America's prominent scientists.
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