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Lynn W Bayer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
Los Angeles County has named a new director for its huge welfare department, replacing outgoing chief Eddy S. Tanaka with career county employee Lynn W. Bayer. Bayer was appointed director of the Department of Public Social Services after the five county supervisors met in executive session earlier in the week. Bayer makes $113,500 a year as director of the Department of Community and Senior Services, which has an annual budget of $115 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
Los Angeles County has named a new director for its huge welfare department, replacing outgoing chief Eddy S. Tanaka with career county employee Lynn W. Bayer. Bayer was appointed director of the Department of Public Social Services after the five county supervisors met in executive session earlier in the week. Bayer makes $113,500 a year as director of the Department of Community and Senior Services, which has an annual budget of $115 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1999
Reacting to a welfare fraud arrest reported on Dec. 31, a letter writer (Jan. 7) asked if there was a welfare fraud hotline to call. The answer is an emphatic yes. Anyone can call We-Tip toll free at (800) 87-FRAUD or (800) 78-CRIME or the Los Angeles County central fraud hotline at (213) 749-4266 to report welfare fraud. Callers to We-Tip or the county fraud hotline can request a reward and can remain anonymous. While many administrative procedures and systems are in place to prevent and detect welfare fraud, tips from the public are also an important way to identify criminals who are taking advantage of programs set up to help the less fortunate who legitimately need assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000
Re "Post-Welfare Jobs No Cure for Poverty, Study Finds," Sept. 7: The Welfare Reform Act of 1996 was passed in response to many years of training programs that proved to be ineffective and perpetuated the cycle of poverty. Studies showed that education and training alone did not work in promoting self-sufficiency. Los Angeles County took the lead nationally in implementing welfare-to-work programs. In the last four years, over 200,000 individuals on cash assistance got jobs. In May 2000, the average entry-level wage for these individuals was $7.34 an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A social worker assigned to a Canoga Park office has been charged with embezzling an estimated $600,000 in welfare funds during the past four years and more arrests are expected, county officials said Thursday. Jennifer Castillo, 41, of Van Nuys, was arrested in June after a joint investigation by the Department of Public Social Services and the district attorney's office, said Sandra Semtner, DPSS spokeswoman. Semtner called the alleged offenses "particularly egregious."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A social worker assigned to the Canoga Park office has been arrested and charged with embezzling an estimated $600,000 in welfare funds during the past four years, and more arrests are expected, county officials said Thursday. Jennifer Castillo, 41, of Van Nuys, was arrested in June after a joint investigation by the Department of Public Social Services and the district attorney's office, said Sandra Semtner, spokeswoman for the social services department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County's decision to revamp its welfare program and push poor mothers to find jobs quickly has paid off, boosting employment and earnings and markedly reducing welfare spending, a new study concludes. The study, released today by New York-based Manpower Demonstration Research Corp., found that recipients enrolled in the county's welfare-to-work program were more likely to get jobs and earn higher wages than those not enrolled in the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 18 months after announcing that they would create the most ambitious after-school child-care system in the nation, Los Angeles County officials said Wednesday that about half the programs are up and running. The progress drew praise from some educators and parents, but also criticism from some child-care advocates who said that it is taking too long to bring all of the 225 targeted elementary schools on board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing deadlines under federal welfare reform laws to find work for thousands of aid recipients, Los Angeles County authorities joined with business and community leaders Thursday in a pledge to work together to create jobs for them. Using the San Fernando Valley as a focal point, participants in a Welfare-to-Work Summit meeting at Cal State Northridge declared that thousands of jobs can be added by local businesses.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | DAVE LESHER and TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nearly 400,000 legal immigrants in California will be cut off from food stamp assistance beginning next week as part of the state's first major step to implement the nation's new welfare reform law, aides to Gov. Pete Wilson said Wednesday. County leaders are scheduled to meet in Sacramento today for a briefing about the food stamp plan as well as an update on an upcoming massive overhaul of the state's welfare system called for under the law signed by President Clinton last month.
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