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Lynn Yeakel

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NEWS
August 6, 1992 | BILL STEIGERWALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the Year of the Woman in politics, Republican Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania may be the Senate's most unwanted man. Democrat Lynn Yeakel certainly hopes so. And based on the latest polls in one of the nation's most closely watched Senate races, she has a solid chance of getting her wish.
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NEWS
October 26, 1992 | From Times ' staff and wire reports
AD FLAP: After a series of setbacks in the late summer and early fall, Democratic candidate Lynn Yeakel regained some of the momentum in her closely watched bid to unseat Republican Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania. But a recent Yeakel commercial, which called Specter the "most obnoxious man in the Senate," may have set her cause back a bit. . . .
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NEWS
October 5, 1992 | From Times Staff Writer
OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS: The political fortunes of two of this year's female Senate candidates have taken decidedly different turns. In Pennsylvania, Democrat Lynn Yeakel's hopes of derailing Republican Sen. Arlen Specter are dimming. Plagued by campaign miscues, Yeakel trailed the incumbent by double digits in a recent poll. . . . In Illinois, Carol Mosely Braun has become a strong favorite to become the first black female to serve in the Senate.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Democratic women candidates for the U.S. Senate agreed Sunday that they should be elected to help revive the nation's economy rather than because of their sex. "The big issue is really not gender. The real issue is moving the economy," said California's Dianne Feinstein, appearing with the other women on CBS' "Face the Nation." Feinstein faces Republican Sen. John Seymour. " . . . The real family value is a job," she said. "Women are seen as spear-throwers of change."
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER
A political newcomer who fueled her longshot bid for office on anger stemming from the sexual harassment charges against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas won the Democratic Senate nomination Tuesday in Pennsylvania. Lynn Yeakel, 50, became the second woman his year to use the issue to upset a better-known male political veteran, defeating Lt. Gov. Mark Singel. "Somebody said it couldn't be done.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Democratic women candidates for the U.S. Senate agreed Sunday that they should be elected to help revive the nation's economy rather than because of their sex. "The big issue is really not gender. The real issue is moving the economy," said California's Dianne Feinstein, appearing with the other women on CBS' "Face the Nation." Feinstein faces Republican Sen. John Seymour. " . . . The real family value is a job," she said. "Women are seen as spear-throwers of change."
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The presidential primary campaign in this state closed out Monday as it began, with a whimper more than a bang, the Democratic candidates pursuing vastly different courses and neither seeming to break through a brick wall of voter indifference. The symbol of this strangely disjointed campaign occurred last week in Pittsburgh, when Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. walked within three feet of each other at a dinner. They passed on by, unspeaking.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Pennsylvania Democrats nudged Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton ever closer to his party's presidential nomination Tuesday, while President Bush scored a victory that effectively clinched his renomination in the Republican race. Clinton, who spent almost all of his time during the relatively placid Pennsylvania campaign targeting Bush, defeated former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. by a commanding margin. With 90% of the vote counted, he led Brown 56% to 26%. Former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas, who suspended his presidential campaign in March but remains on the ballot in many states, had 13%. Among Republicans, Bush held a 77%-23% lead over former television commentator Patrick J. Buchanan.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | From Times wire services
The National Organization for Women said Friday that it hopes to tap into a popular campaign theme--disgust with incumbents--while pushing women candidates and opposing President Bush. "We are about to make a dramatic breakthrough at the federal level," NOW President Patricia Ireland said. "Certainly, the public disgust with scandal, greed and corruption feeds into this in a major way." High-profile victories in U.S.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | Reuters
Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), who is waging a reelection fight fueled by controversy over his interrogation of Anita Faye Hill at Clarence Thomas' Supreme Court confirmation hearings last year, says he is disappointed with Thomas' court performance. Specter, replying to a question at a campaign rally Tuesday in Pittsburgh, said he was especially disappointed with Thomas' dissent in a recent high court case involving the beating of a manacled prison inmate.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | BILL STEIGERWALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the Year of the Woman in politics, Republican Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania may be the Senate's most unwanted man. Democrat Lynn Yeakel certainly hopes so. And based on the latest polls in one of the nation's most closely watched Senate races, she has a solid chance of getting her wish.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER
A political newcomer who fueled her longshot bid for office on anger stemming from the sexual harassment charges against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas won the Democratic Senate nomination Tuesday in Pennsylvania. Lynn Yeakel, 50, became the second woman his year to use the issue to upset a better-known male political veteran, defeating Lt. Gov. Mark Singel. "Somebody said it couldn't be done.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Pennsylvania Democrats nudged Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton ever closer to his party's presidential nomination Tuesday, while President Bush scored a victory that effectively clinched his renomination in the Republican race. Clinton, who spent almost all of his time during the relatively placid Pennsylvania campaign targeting Bush, defeated former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. by a commanding margin. With 90% of the vote counted, he led Brown 56% to 26%. Former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas, who suspended his presidential campaign in March but remains on the ballot in many states, had 13%. Among Republicans, Bush held a 77%-23% lead over former television commentator Patrick J. Buchanan.
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The presidential primary campaign in this state closed out Monday as it began, with a whimper more than a bang, the Democratic candidates pursuing vastly different courses and neither seeming to break through a brick wall of voter indifference. The symbol of this strangely disjointed campaign occurred last week in Pittsburgh, when Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. walked within three feet of each other at a dinner. They passed on by, unspeaking.
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