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Lynnda Ferguson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Living out of a suitcase has its compensations. For Lynnda Ferguson, one of the most widely traveled leading ladies of American theater, it means the freedom of an uncluttered existence. "There's something lovely about the simplicity of it," said the tall, blond actress who is starring in "The Philadelphia Story" at South Coast Repertory. "There are no phone calls. You don't have to deal with the rest of the day-to-day demands of living. The only responsibility you have is to the play you're in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Living out of a suitcase has its compensations. For Lynnda Ferguson, one of the most widely traveled leading ladies of American theater, it means the freedom of an uncluttered existence. "There's something lovely about the simplicity of it," said the tall, blond actress who is starring in "The Philadelphia Story" at South Coast Repertory. "There are no phone calls. You don't have to deal with the rest of the day-to-day demands of living. The only responsibility you have is to the play you're in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1992 | JAN HERMAN
Libby Appel, who is directing the upcoming revival of "The Philadelphia Story" at South Coast Repertory, has an appealing gift for hyperbole. "There are maybe three people in the world who can play Tracy Lord," she says of the central character in Philip Barry's 1939 comedy, which begins previews Friday on the SCR Mainstage. "One is Lynnda Ferguson. The other two are Katharine Hepburn."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1992 | JAN HERMAN
Libby Appel, who is directing the upcoming revival of "The Philadelphia Story" at South Coast Repertory, has an appealing gift for hyperbole. "There are maybe three people in the world who can play Tracy Lord," she says of the central character in Philip Barry's 1939 comedy, which begins previews Friday on the SCR Mainstage. "One is Lynnda Ferguson. The other two are Katharine Hepburn."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001
* Theater. "Les Liaisons Dangereuses," a handsome production directed by Sheldon Epps at the Pasadena Playhouse through Sunday, revisits the icy amoral adventures of Valmont (James Sutorius) and Merteuil (Lynnda Ferguson) in Christopher Hampton's adaptation of the 1782 novel. Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Today and Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 5 and 9 p.m.; Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m. $15 to $42.50. (626) 356-PLAY. * Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | JAN HERMAN
Making his South Coast Repertory debut in Noel Coward's "Private Lives," which opens tonight in Costa Mesa, puts Alastair Duncan in mind of the playwright's relationship with Gertrude Lawrence. "They fought like cat and dog, but they also loved each other," said the Scottish actor, who plays Elyot, the role that Coward created for himself opposite Lawrence's Amanda in the original 1930 production in London. "Coward had a reputation for being vitriolic in company.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Murray Mednick's "Mrs. Feuerstein," the third and final play in Padua Playwrights' all-Mednick season at 2100 Square Feet, is a challenging, rich, sometimes confusing drama that confronts the nature of evil head-on, with no easy answers. The similarities to Mednick's "Joe and Betty," the second play of the season, are profound, as are the differences. The central figures in both plays are tortured, neurotic Jewish women who stumble through life in a miasma of psychic misery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noel Coward's "Private Lives" is one of theater's most sure-fire entertainments, and South Coast Repertory has mounted brilliant Coward revivals more than once. It seems a perfect match. Of course, someone probably said the same thing about the newly married couples who arrive at a coastal resort in the first act of "Private Lives"--yet their respective honeymoons collapse within minutes. Fear not. Director David Chambers makes the most of South Coast's affair with Coward's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Something definitely was on the mind of director Libby Appel when she staged Philip Barry's 1939 "The Philadelphia Story," which opened over the weekend at South Coast Repertory. You can guess what it is when you enter the theater and see the opulence on stage. It is what Barry called "the arrogance of class."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
With some plays more than others it's important to get the clothes right, and "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" is one of those plays. The new Pasadena Playhouse production boasts all the frills and brocade you could wish for, nicely tailored for the elegant weasels at hand. For this we must thank costume designer Jean-Pierre Dorleac, who won a Tony Award for "Marat/Sade" and an Emmy for a decidedly non-Louis-XVI project, "Battlestar Galactica."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Don't be late when you go see "Twelfth Night" at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. You'll miss more than the start of the play. The best aspects of the production begin before it, and they begin outside the theater, on the way in. They are a visually and aurally striking re-creation of a Caribbean carnival procession, presumably based on the Jamaican Jonkonnu, if we correctly interpret consulting dramaturg Judith Bettelheim's program notes.
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