Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLynndie England
IN THE NEWS

Lynndie England

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
May 5, 2005 | Lianne Hart and Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writers
A military judge abruptly tossed out a guilty plea Wednesday and declared a mistrial in the court-martial of Pfc. Lynndie R. England, throwing in doubt the prosecution of an Army reservist notorious for her role in the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal. The judge, Col. James Pohl, dismissed the jury in the sentencing phase of her case and sent the year-old matter back to a lieutenant general who would weigh a range of options, including starting over or dismissing the case.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
August 15, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A lecture by the woman who became the public face of the Abu Ghraib scandal was canceled at the Library of Congress after threats caused concerns about staff safety. Former Army reservist Lynndie England had been scheduled to discuss her biography as part of a veterans forum on Capitol Hill.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 15, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A lecture by the woman who became the public face of the Abu Ghraib scandal was canceled at the Library of Congress after threats caused concerns about staff safety. Former Army reservist Lynndie England had been scheduled to discuss her biography as part of a veterans forum on Capitol Hill.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2005 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Lynndie R. England, the Army Reserve private who posed for some of the most notorious photographs in the Abu Ghraib detainee abuse scandal, was sentenced Tuesday to three years in a military prison. Of the multiple images that emerged from the prison in Iraq in late 2003, a picture of England -- wearing a military T-shirt and holding a dog leash attached to a naked Iraqi prisoner -- became an icon of the scandal. The military jury hearing England's court-martial at Ft.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
TEXAS A military judge at Ft. Hood reversed himself and decided to let prosecutors use a statement that Army Pfc. Lynndie England gave to investigators implicating herself in the abuse of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Jury selection and opening statements are expected today in England's court-martial on seven counts of conspiracy and prisoner abuse. The judge presiding over the case, Col.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
An Army judge at Ft. Hood refused to step aside for Pfc. Lynndie England's trial on charges of abusing prisoners in Iraq, saying he was not to blame for her botched guilty plea. Col. James Pohl rejected an argument by the defense that he asked inappropriate questions of a witness, Pvt. Charles A. Graner Jr., the reputed abuse ringleader.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Army reservist Lynndie England, who was shown holding a naked Iraqi prisoner on a leash in some of the most inflammatory photographs that exposed abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, will be court-martialed on May 3, the Army said in Ft. Hood. Pfc.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A psychologist testified that Pvt. Lynndie England suffered from depression and that her mental condition, coupled with an overly compliant personality, made her a heedless participant in the abuse of inmates at Abu Ghraib prison. Xavier Amador, a clinical psychologist from New York, said England's soldier boyfriend, Charles Graner, was her "social accomplice" whom she relied upon without reservation to guide her behavior.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Pfc. Lynndie R. England, the Army reservist seen in some of the most notorious photos in the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal in Iraq, has given birth to a boy fathered by another soldier charged in the case. The 21-year-old had the baby at the hospital at Ft. Bragg, N.C., said Col. Billy Buckner, an Army spokesman.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors ended a military court hearing at Ft. Bragg for a soldier shown in photos of naked Iraqi prisoners by requesting an additional charge of "maltreatment and cruelty" against Pfc. Lynndie R. England. The hearing to determine whether England should face a full court-martial adjourned without testimony from any of the witnesses sought by the defense, including Vice President Dick Cheney and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. Col. Denise J.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A psychologist testified that Pvt. Lynndie England suffered from depression and that her mental condition, coupled with an overly compliant personality, made her a heedless participant in the abuse of inmates at Abu Ghraib prison. Xavier Amador, a clinical psychologist from New York, said England's soldier boyfriend, Charles Graner, was her "social accomplice" whom she relied upon without reservation to guide her behavior.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
A lawyer for Army Pfc. Lynndie England said Wednesday that she posed for graphic photos of detainee abuse at Abu Ghraib prison at the direction of her soldier boyfriend, whom she loved and trusted and didn't think would mislead her. Capt. Jonathan Crisp also told jurors that England, charged with seven counts of conspiracy and abuse, had learning disabilities and was prone to clinical depression that made it difficult for her to function as a soldier in the constant stress of the Iraq prison.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
TEXAS A military judge at Ft. Hood reversed himself and decided to let prosecutors use a statement that Army Pfc. Lynndie England gave to investigators implicating herself in the abuse of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Jury selection and opening statements are expected today in England's court-martial on seven counts of conspiracy and prisoner abuse. The judge presiding over the case, Col.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
In a setback for the prosecution, a military judge ruled Friday that Pfc. Lynndie England's statements to Army investigators about her actions at Abu Ghraib prison cannot be used as evidence at her upcoming trial. The judge, Col. James Pohl, said during a pretrial hearing that he believed England did not fully understand the consequences when she waived her rights against self-incrimination before speaking to the investigators in January 2004.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
An Army judge at Ft. Hood refused to step aside for Pfc. Lynndie England's trial on charges of abusing prisoners in Iraq, saying he was not to blame for her botched guilty plea. Col. James Pohl rejected an argument by the defense that he asked inappropriate questions of a witness, Pvt. Charles A. Graner Jr., the reputed abuse ringleader.
OPINION
May 9, 2005
Re "Abu Ghraib Guilty Plea Is Dismissed," May 5: Could it be that the military judge declared the Pfc. Lynndie England case a mistrial in an attempt to rebalance the scales of justice following the investigation that essentially absolved everybody in high command of any accountability for the Abu Ghraib prison atrocities? Let's face it, most people don't believe those abuses occurred without people at the top knowing about them anymore than they buy Kenneth Lay's statements that he had no idea of the fraud being perpetrated by his employees at Enron.
OPINION
August 6, 2004
Re "Abused Iraqi Detainees Said to Hold No Intelligence Value," Aug. 4: It is very depressing to witness the "dumping on" of Pfc. Lynndie England at the preliminary hearing of the pregnant, young Reserve soldier who was miraculously running policy and operations at the infamous Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq all by herself, while the brass sat around in their officers quarters, totally oblivious. Why are their heads not rolling for dereliction of duty? Alex Sheppard Reseda On Page 11, you've an article about England's hearing for her part in the prison brutalities fostered by both military and private contract personnel (Aug.
OPINION
May 9, 2005
Re "Abu Ghraib Guilty Plea Is Dismissed," May 5: Could it be that the military judge declared the Pfc. Lynndie England case a mistrial in an attempt to rebalance the scales of justice following the investigation that essentially absolved everybody in high command of any accountability for the Abu Ghraib prison atrocities? Let's face it, most people don't believe those abuses occurred without people at the top knowing about them anymore than they buy Kenneth Lay's statements that he had no idea of the fraud being perpetrated by his employees at Enron.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2005 | Lianne Hart and Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writers
A military judge abruptly tossed out a guilty plea Wednesday and declared a mistrial in the court-martial of Pfc. Lynndie R. England, throwing in doubt the prosecution of an Army reservist notorious for her role in the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal. The judge, Col. James Pohl, dismissed the jury in the sentencing phase of her case and sent the year-old matter back to a lieutenant general who would weigh a range of options, including starting over or dismissing the case.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Defense lawyers sought leniency for Pfc. Lynndie R. England at a hearing Tuesday to determine her punishment in the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal, with a psychologist testifying that the reservist was oxygen-deprived at birth, speech-impaired and had trouble learning to read. West Virginia school psychologist Thomas Denne -- the first defense witness -- said England's learning disabilities were identified when she was in kindergarten.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|