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Lynne Exe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles animal regulation commissioner from the San Fernando Valley resigned Tuesday, saying animal rights advocates have unduly influenced the panel, particularly its policy to ban coyote trapping. Lynne Exe submitted her resignation to Mayor Richard Riordan seven months after she was confirmed to the panel by a split vote of the City Council amid sharp criticism from animal rights advocates. Her resignation from the five-member commission is effective Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles animal regulation commissioner from the San Fernando Valley resigned Tuesday, saying animal rights advocates have unduly influenced the panel, particularly its policy to ban coyote trapping. Lynne Exe submitted her resignation to Mayor Richard Riordan seven months after she was confirmed to the panel by a split vote of the City Council amid sharp criticism from animal rights advocates. Her resignation from the five-member commission is effective Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a storm of protest by animal rights groups, a Los Angeles City Council panel Monday rejected one of Mayor Richard Riordan's appointees to the Animal Regulation Commission, contending that she has consistently opposed animal rights reform. Van Nuys resident Lynne Exe was rejected 2 to 1 by the council's Public Safety Committee after animal rights advocates portrayed her as a vindictive apologist for the beleaguered Department of Animal Regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA
The Los Angeles City Council voted 8 to 3 Tuesday to confirm the appointment of Evelynne Exe of Van Nuys to the Animal Regulations Commission despite the opposition of animal rights groups. Exe, nominated to the commission post by Mayor Richard Riordan, was sharply criticized by Animal Alliance spokeswoman Joan Luchs as close-minded and out of step with efforts to reform the Animal Regulation Department, the agency that the commission governs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA
The Los Angeles City Council voted 8 to 3 Tuesday to confirm the appointment of Evelynne Exe of Van Nuys to the Animal Regulations Commission despite the opposition of animal rights groups. Exe, nominated to the commission post by Mayor Richard Riordan, was sharply criticized by Animal Alliance spokeswoman Joan Luchs as close-minded and out of step with efforts to reform the Animal Regulation Department, the agency that the commission governs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1994
The remarks of outgoing animal regulation Commissioner Lynne Exe ("Supporter of Coyote Trapping Quits Panel," April 13) cannot be left unchallenged. "The commission is controlled by special interests," she contends, referring to animal rights advocates. Huh? Has Exe written her own dictionary or what? In English, the term special interest refers to a group or industry that takes a stand from which it receives economic benefit. I challenge Exe to explain how the humane community profits financially from the ban on coyote trapping!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994
A Los Angeles Animal Regulation Commissioner from the San Fernando Valley resigned Tuesday, saying animal rights advocates have unduly influenced the panel, particularly its policy to continue a ban on coyote trapping. Lynne Exe submitted her resignation to Mayor Richard Riordan, seven months after she was confirmed to the five-member panel by a split vote of the City Council amid sharp criticism from animal rights advocates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan on Friday appointed 21 more city commissioners to panels overseeing animal care, building codes, Civil Service rules, cultural affairs and pension funds. Appointees to the Animal Regulation Commission include two former members of the panel, Pat Bercel and Mimi Robins; Lynne Exe, a member of Mercy Crusade, and Ellen Stein, a former schoolteacher who has been active in the the Pet Orphan Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1993 | KURT PITZER
The Los Angeles Board of Animal Regulation Commissioners is scheduled to review a decision to stop trapping coyotes approved by the previous board. At the urging of animal rights activists, the board in June eliminated coyote trapping by city workers. Since then, animal regulation workers have received a surge of complaints from hillside homeowners, who say they are losing pets to a booming coyote population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Animal Regulation Commission usually join the panel because they're passionate about animals. But that passion, sometimes, makes them act like, well, animals. A case in point occurred Monday when Commissioner Gini Barrett, upset at comments made by fellow Commissioner Russ Cook, shouted an obscenity across the room and then launched an empty water bottle at him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a storm of protest by animal rights groups, a Los Angeles City Council panel Monday rejected one of Mayor Richard Riordan's appointees to the Animal Regulation Commission, contending that she has consistently opposed animal rights reform. Van Nuys resident Lynne Exe was rejected 2 to 1 by the council's Public Safety Committee after animal rights advocates portrayed her as a vindictive apologist for the beleaguered Department of Animal Regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Animal Regulation Commission usually join the panel because they're passionate about animals. But that passion sometimes makes them act like, well, animals. A case in point occurred Monday when Commissioner Gini Barrett, upset at comments made by fellow Commissioner Russ Cook, shouted an obscenity across the room and then launched an empty water bottle at him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Rush, general manager of the troubled Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation, on Wednesday announced he is retiring for medical reasons. "I can't take it anymore. The stress is wiping me out," Rush, 61, told The Times. "I'll be putting off hospitalization until I retire." Rush, who has headed the department for 22 years, said his decision to retire May 5 was motivated by doctor's orders related to what he called "pretty bad heart problems."
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