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Lynne Sharon Schwartz

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November 8, 1987 | Daphne Merkin, Merkin is an editor and author of the novel "Enchantment" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich) .
Lynne Sharon Schwartz fixes upon the world an anthropologist's clear eye, as though the contemporary, familiar-seeming people she writes about were members of a lost tribe whose habits and ways she has documented. Her novels and stories abound in telling details--the vagaries of the emotional life pinned, like so many butterflies, to a backdrop of the factual: what she wore, how he looked, the meals that got eaten, the movies that were seen.
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June 26, 2009 | David L. Ulin, Ulin is book editor of The Times.
Lynne Sharon Schwartz begins "Not Now, Voyager" with a telling recollection: She is in Orkos, on the Greek island of Naxos, when she awakens "to a darkness so thick I could breathe it in." There is no electricity, no light anywhere, nothing but the disassociating black. Schwartz knows where she is, yet even so she wonders: "Maybe time had stopped and I was in the afterlife, or some place in between, a dark place, oddly enough with the same layout and furniture of my final room."
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BOOKS
May 26, 1996 | Frederick Busch, Frederick Busch's most recent book is "The Children in the Woods: New and Selected Stories." He is Fairchild professor of literature at Colgate University
Here's the story, by a fine novelist, of her happy addiction to books. She's as mad for them as Eudora Welty describes herself in "One Writer's Beginnings," unable to "remember a time when I was not in love with them--with the books themselves, cover and binding and the paper they were printed on, with their smell and their weight and with their possession in my arms, captured and carried off to myself."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Lynne Sharon Schwartz made her novelistic debut in 1980 with "Rough Strife," which was nominated for the PEN/Hemingway First Novel Award. In her five subsequent novels, she continued to explore the fruitful terrain of angst-ridden life in New York City, most recently with "In the Family Way: An Urban Comedy." "Referred Pain" is both the title and title piece of her most recent book, containing a dozen short stories.
BOOKS
August 20, 1995 | Daphne Merkin, Critic Daphne Merkin has a forthcoming collection of essays, "The Discovery of Sex
Anyone who reads or writes novels has had ample reason to wonder this past decade or two whither the art of fiction goeth, and why. Are there enough readers of "serious" fiction to make it other than an exercise in prestigious futility for mainstream publishers?
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When novelist Lynne Sharon Schwartz accepted an invitation to teach the graduate fiction-writing workshop at UC Irvine last winter, she envisioned an "appealing respite" from a bleak and hectic winter in New York City. As it turned out, her 10-week stint was anything but the midwinter idyll she imagined. In a particularly bitter postscript to an article she wrote in the current issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, Schwartz says she "found the writing program at Irvine in a state of disarray."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | David L. Ulin, Ulin is book editor of The Times.
Lynne Sharon Schwartz begins "Not Now, Voyager" with a telling recollection: She is in Orkos, on the Greek island of Naxos, when she awakens "to a darkness so thick I could breathe it in." There is no electricity, no light anywhere, nothing but the disassociating black. Schwartz knows where she is, yet even so she wonders: "Maybe time had stopped and I was in the afterlife, or some place in between, a dark place, oddly enough with the same layout and furniture of my final room."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Lynne Sharon Schwartz made her novelistic debut in 1980 with "Rough Strife," which was nominated for the PEN/Hemingway First Novel Award. In her five subsequent novels, she continued to explore the fruitful terrain of angst-ridden life in New York City, most recently with "In the Family Way: An Urban Comedy." "Referred Pain" is both the title and title piece of her most recent book, containing a dozen short stories.
BOOKS
October 10, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Academia is a parallel planet that can be delightful to read about. Once inside the gates, the characters seem pre-selected for such attributes as average beauty, intellectual curiosity and disdain for the greedy world. Regular concerns like how to pay the rent often do not figure in novels set in this firm bosom, and sometimes the dissimilarity between the characters' concerns and those of people outside the gates makes it hard to take them seriously.
BOOKS
October 10, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Academia is a parallel planet that can be delightful to read about. Once inside the gates, the characters seem pre-selected for such attributes as average beauty, intellectual curiosity and disdain for the greedy world. Regular concerns like how to pay the rent often do not figure in novels set in this firm bosom, and sometimes the dissimilarity between the characters' concerns and those of people outside the gates makes it hard to take them seriously.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | FREDERICK BUSCH
Here's the story, by a fine novelist, of her happy addiction to books. She's as mad for them as Eudora Welty describes herself in "One Writer's Beginnings," unable to "remember a time when I was not in love with them--with the books themselves, cover and binding and the paper they were printed on, with their smell and their weight and with their possession in my arms, captured and carried off to myself."
BOOKS
August 20, 1995 | Daphne Merkin, Critic Daphne Merkin has a forthcoming collection of essays, "The Discovery of Sex
Anyone who reads or writes novels has had ample reason to wonder this past decade or two whither the art of fiction goeth, and why. Are there enough readers of "serious" fiction to make it other than an exercise in prestigious futility for mainstream publishers?
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When novelist Lynne Sharon Schwartz accepted an invitation to teach the graduate fiction-writing workshop at UC Irvine last winter, she envisioned an "appealing respite" from a bleak and hectic winter in New York City. As it turned out, her 10-week stint was anything but the midwinter idyll she imagined. In a particularly bitter postscript to an article she wrote in the current issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, Schwartz says she "found the writing program at Irvine in a state of disarray."
BOOKS
November 8, 1987 | Daphne Merkin, Merkin is an editor and author of the novel "Enchantment" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich) .
Lynne Sharon Schwartz fixes upon the world an anthropologist's clear eye, as though the contemporary, familiar-seeming people she writes about were members of a lost tribe whose habits and ways she has documented. Her novels and stories abound in telling details--the vagaries of the emotional life pinned, like so many butterflies, to a backdrop of the factual: what she wore, how he looked, the meals that got eaten, the movies that were seen.
BOOKS
April 28, 1996
I so enjoyed Lynne Sharon Schwartz's essay, "How Baseball Momentarily Distracted Me From Reading" (March 31) about her mysterious fascination with the '86 Mets, but there was an error in your caption of the accompanying photograph. The Mets were scheduled to play Game 7 the night after the miraculous victory in Game 6, but the heavens had other plans; the game was postponed because of rain and played the next evening. Because attending Game 7 was one of the highlights of my life, I wanted to set the record straight.
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